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II 



«. 



/^^K ANSAS STATE 

(^OLLEGIAN 



INSIDE 

K-State's College 
Rodeo opens 
tonight in Weber 
Arena. 

SttriMThft* 




www. kslalecoUegiancom 



Friday, February 23, 2007 



Vol. HI. No. 109 



SGA returns 

textbook 

legislation 

to committee 



iy Adriann* DtiwMM 

KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

Student Senate members re- 
ferred a resolution supporting an 
oniine textbook iist proposal back 
to its standing committee with a 
vote of 26-1 80 at iheir meeting 
Thursday night 

Robert Swift, CoUege of Arts 
and Sciences senator, made the 
motion to refer the resolution back 
to committee, and the motion re- 
sulted in more than 30 minutes of 
debate from Senate members. 

"It just doesn't seem like ev- 
erybody is sure if Vamey's (Book- 
store) is included or not," said 
Swift, sophomore in psychology. "I 
don't necessarily see the huge rush 
in passing it (Thursday night)." 

During the meeting's first open 
speaking period and prior to the 
resolution's debate, Jeff Levin, 
co-owner of Vamey's, gave a 45- 
minute presentation about the ef- 
fects of an online textbook list on 
Vamey's 

"1 think what we have is a lot of 
history," Levin said. "I've got 117 
years of data, literally, that we go 
back to to help us make predic- 
tions about what we can and cant 
do. [ don't know that the univer- 
sity could replicate that because 
they have no history." 

According to a University Rela- 
tions Committee report, the inter- 
nal textbook -listing process would 
include three steps. First, profes- 
sors would submit their textbook 
infomiation to department heads 
Second, department heads would 
give the textbook information to 
the registrar's office Finally, the 
registrar's office would publish the 
information electronically. 

The proposal also states poten- 
tial benefits for Varney's Book- 
store include easy access to the 
university's master list and a more 
complete order list, which could 
strengthen the buy-back cycle. 

Varney's officials support a 
textbook list and are working with 
the provost's office regarding po- 
tential problems with a master list 

St«SENArEPa9«11 



Military matrimony 




Photoi t>y Catrini Riwmhi | (DLlFOItN 

KIrbte Cofnaja senior In graphic dasign; Tysort Erdman, senior In mass communication* and his twHa, As hlay Erdman, 
tanler In graphic dailgn; talk Thursday afternoon during Comejo and Ashley's senior walk-through project tn Wlllard Hall. 
Ashley will become a military wife when Tyson Is commissioned as an officer following his graduation from K-State. 

Separation, constant travel affect army marriages 



BytcnHadgM 

KANiltSSIMEQllEGIAN 

Soldiers sacrifice time, commit- 
ments, careers and even their lives 
for the sake of fighting for their 
country 

But what about the sacrifices the 
soldier's spouse makes? The spouse 
commits, not only to his or her part- 
ner, but also to the job. 

This is the life awaiting Ashley 
Erdman when her husband. IVson, 
a cadet in K-State's Army ROTC 
program, commissions and goes into 
active duty in the US. Army, 

Erdman, a senior in graphic de- 
sign, said she doesn't know what to 
expect when her husband's military 
career finally begins. 

"I really don't have a lot of ex- 
pectations since 1 really don't know 
much about the life." she said. "I'm 
just pretty much open to anything." 

Despite being family-oriented, 
Erdman said she would have no 
problem leaving relatives behind 
to follow her husband around the 
country or overseas 

"I think it would be fun to travel 
for a while and see different parts 
of the world or even just the United 
States," she said. "It's probably on 
opportunity I normally wouldn't 



have. If it weren't for the military, 
we'd probably just move back to 
Wichita and have normal jobs" 

Erdman said she would like to 
see her husband stationed in Italy or 
Germany, but there are places she 
hopes she won't have to live. 

"I'm not planning on moving to 
Saudi Arabia with him," she said 
with a laugh. 

The possibility of war awaits 
many new soldiers, and Erdman 
said she is prepared to see her hus 
band ofi if he ever is called upon to 
deploy. 

"We've had friends that have 
gone to Iraq, and they've prepared 
me for whenever he has to go," she 
said 

According to a study by the Of- 
fice of Army Demographics, in 2005 
approximately 54 percent of soldiers 
in the Army were married 

"It takes a little bit of getting used 
to when realizing that when you 
send him off to work every day you 
aren't entirety for sure if he'll come 
back home," said Stacy Johnston, 
financial readiness supervisor for 
Army Morale, Welfare, and Recre- 
ation. 

Johnston's husband, a major, has 
been in the army for 17 years. John- 
ston has served in the army herself 




Tyson Erdman, ROTC cadat, lalki 

or his radio during an ROTC recondo 
training mission Wednesday evening on 
the K- State campus. 

for four years and said she was for- 
tunate to bypass the culture shock of 
the military when she married her 
husband 

"My first couple of years. I was 
transitioning from the military and 
getting used to being a military 

Sw SPOUSE P19C IT 



Student plans 

campus bone 

man'ow drive 

after transplant 



■y Duitirt Sanborn 

KANSAS STATE COLLtGIAM 

A bone marrow transplant made 
it possible for Rachael Leisy to 
overcome her stmggte with Myelo- 
dysplastic Syndrome. Now she said 
she wants to help other people with 
the same problem. 

Leisy, sophomore in pre-pro- 
fessional elementary education, 
helped organize a bone marrow 
drive, which will be from 9 am. to 3 
p.m. today in the Powercat Confer- 
ence Room in the K-State Alumni 
Center. 

"When you sign up to become 
a bone marrow donor, you sign up 
to save someone else's life," Leisy 
said 

Leisy worked with her transplant 
coordinator, the National Marrow 
Donor Program, Heart of America 
and Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority 
to bring the drive to K-State 

"Bringing a bone marrow drive 
to K-State is great because it makes 
people aware of something they may 
not know a lot about." said Lagail 
Chism, recruiting specialist. 

Leisy said another drive will take 
place in May for those who can't 
make it to today's event but want to 
become donors. 

"Students should allow at least 
20 minutes to complete the pro- 
cess," Leisy said. "K is really easy, 
just a mouth swab and some paper- 
work, as well as a short informa- 
tional video." 

After completing the process 
participants will be placed on the 
National Marrow Donor Registry 

According to umw.manozn.oTg, 
the registry includes more than 6.5 
million people Marrow and curd 
blood help more than 35,000 peo- 
ple with each year 

Members of Kappa, Leisy's soror- 
ity, have helped to make the drive a 
reality. 

"We have volunteered to help 
run the drive and are there to sup- 
port Rachael," said Melissa Coultis, 
sophomore in elementary educa- 
tion. 

Members also spoke at soror- 
ity houses and made posters to in- 
crease awareness about the donor 
program. 



'Show K-State' highlights campus departments, students 



By Salana Strata 

KINSAS STATE COtlEGIAN 

Behind the scenes of the produc- 
tion of "Show K State," students and 
staff of the Educational Communica- 
tions Center are working to create K- 
State's newest TV program. 

Debuting fan. 29, "Show K-State" 
is a half- hour block of programming 
that features different aspects of cam 
pus life. 

"The title itself is pretty demon 
strable of what the series is about," 
said Jim Mock, director of produc- 
tion for the Educational Communi- 
cations Center "It is about showing 
K-State all the differenl activities and 
individuals and the things they are 
doing" 



•w 



''ShowK-Statt" 

OnQunnrlS 
1: Monday 6 p.m., 
WedneuJay and f rldjy It 9 a.m. and 6 pJn., 
TlKMlajr and Thursday it J p.m. and 10 p^m. 
SAriiy tnd Sunday 9 a,m., } fLifL, and 6 pjn. 

Mock said "Show K State" started 
out as an arts show Some of the 
programs included a jazz concert, in- 
terpretive readings and dance perfor 
mances. On Feb 22, the crew filmed 
a segment about furniture design 
from the Department of Interior Ar- 
chitecture. 

"We kicked around our ideas and 
set a time for production," Mock said. 
"We went over to the location and 
got a sense of what was there. We 



will probably put this (segment) on 
the air within a week" 

The crew filmed two segments 
about himiture design The first was 
a general interview about the depart 
ment, and the second filming pro 
moted the interior architecture de- 
partment's involvement with K-State 
Open House on April 14. 

Mary Molina, video production 
specialist, helps the crew brainstorm 
ideas for feature guests 

"We are trying to branch out and 
make the show a lot more interesting 
for other people," Molina said. "We 
began looking around the different 
programs. Interior architecture is a 
pretty powerful program and we de- 

Sm SHOW Page 11 




LyndMyBi)Tn|i:OUE(^IAN 

David Brown, atsociata prefasiar In interior aKhltactura and product 
design, antwars a quertiori from Dianne Paukiteli^, 'Show K-State' Interviewer, 
dunng 'Show K-State" at Bob Dole Halt Thursday afternoon. 



Today's forecast 

Scattered thunderstorms 
l|* High: 56 Low: 47 




INSIDE 



Tlw Academy Awards will be this Sunday, lest 
ytur reviewing skills « just it*p tttA of the 
nights winners with ouf Os^^rs check list and 
pkks for who will tdke hoine the title. Popcorn 
not included. 

SMftwyPaitl 



CAMPUS NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 



Coffee Hour to show 
Philippine cutture 

Philippines: A Reason to Celebritt 
will display various aspects of 
Philippine culture today from 4-5 
p.m. at the International Student 
Center, It is part of the Coffee Hour, 
an infomul fomm for inlffnational 
students to discuss a variety of top 
ics or to showcase the unique arts 
of their country, 



Event to teach animal 
health practices 

Oris In grades 6-8 will participate 
in the All 4 Animal Health Saturday 
from9a.m.to4p.matyartous 
places on the K Stale campus. 
The students will discover how 
scientists and engineers help keep 
animals healthy The event is spon 
sofed by the Women in Engineer- 
ing and Science Program. 



Clinton tickets Still 
available at Bramlage 

Tdtets m available for Bill Clinton^ 
Landon lecture The gerserat publk, 
students and faculty can pick up 
tktots 00 a hrvt (otne, first served 
basis at 10 a.m. today at the north 
west tld<ei windows at Bramlage 
Coliseum At least SOO ticiiets reman 
For the lecture, which will take place 
at 1:30 pim. Match 2 in Bnnilage, 



Mauinn faumrifac I ARant&ih|>|Hl))MAiiitriam,whilMmHiMig 
ridying IdVUmO I «d^««ypirtotthew«W<ki^adn*enwt? 



Hillary Clinton 

Oprah Winfrey 

Condoleczza ftlce 

Laura Eknh 

Margaret Thatcher 
An9elinaMie 




Page 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, F«b. 23, 2007 



'Call 



776-5577 



Puzzles I Eugene Sheffer 




ACROSS 
1 Carte 

4 Joe's ilk 
7 Rapid 

12 Fleur- 
de-- 

13 Importanl 
numero 

14 Corver- 
sation 
startei 

\% Squid 
stjuirl 

16 Discuss 

10 Candte 
coutil 

19 Good- 
mans 
style 

20Pr)p 

22 Fuss 

23 Toucli 
27 "SNL^ 

alum 

Tina 
29 Up till 

now 
31 Abrade 

34 Nor limp 

35 aass 
room 
group 

37 Listening 
device 

38 NYSE 
counler- 
part 



39 Ashen 
41 LabyrtnUi 

goal 
45 Model- 

airplane 

wood 

47 Compass 
pi 

48 Pedes- 
tnan 
tour 

52 Bom 

53 Wicker- 
work 
willow 

54 Ultra- 
modemiat 

55 Make a 
decision 

56 Milky 
liquids 

57 Kteskin's 
claim 

56 To ttie — 
degree 



DOWN 

1 Jer^niler 
Garner 
ssnes 

2 Jargon 

3 Sent out 
in^ilalioris 

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SSorlot 

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8 -Char- 
tone's — ■ 

9 UN agcy. 

10 Winter 
affliction 

11 Wiggles 
Ian. 
lYpically 

17RadK} 

dial 
21 Fasten 

23 Blading 

24 Cranberry 
temtory 



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26 0neot 
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30Histcvk: 

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31 IRS 
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32 Drone 
33Migtit¥ 

Joe 
Young, 

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36 Clear (he 
decks 

37 Foltows 
40 Last 

word of 
"Farmer in 
the Deir 

42 Noble 
gas 

43 KlutTy 

44 Choppers 

45 Music 
segments 

4C0n 
4S 'Holy 
mackefeir 

49 Blond 
st\ade 

50 Whopper 

51 Cmcial 



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BEST BETS 



Your social calendar for the weekend 




Feature film: "Stranger Than Fiction* At the theater: "Proof" 




8 p.m. forum 
Hifl* 

Admiislon:$1 

An IRS auditor 

suddenly finds 

himself the sub- 

jta o( narration 

only he an hear: 

narration th«t btgins to effect his entire life, from hij 

worli to his love-interest to his death. 

'Movie also shows 7 pm. and 9:10 pm. SatunJay and 8 

p.m, Sunday, Admission is $2. 

UPC After Hours: "The Late Noir: 
Blacit History Variety Show" 

S-1 1 p.m. K-State Student Union Counyard 
Admission: Free 

The variety show will feature Deborah UuhwezI, singer; 
Dr Coins Band, jazz; and Kate ladison. spoken wonj. 
Your best bet is to get there early, because there's free 
crafts and pizza for the first 200 people. 




730 p.m. Man- 
hatan Arts Center* 
Admission: SB for 
students 

A mad 

mathematical 
genius, a daughter 
who might have 
inherited her father's genius or hts madness and d desper- 
ate graduate student out to make a name tor himself, 
perhaps by stealing his mentor's notebooks or making 
love to his mentor's daughter— all of the ingredients (or a 
great night of theater. 

*This play also will be performed Saturday and Sunday. 
For showlimes and further information, call {7S5) SJ7- 
4420 Or visit IheirWeb site at wwwmantianonarti.org. 

Local musical performances 

If you're feeling like some heavy metal jam sessions, see 
bands ClofkTower Project, Zerof ixx, yice & Virtue and From 
Brutality with Drucifer from the Pit 101 ,S at 10 p.m. at 
P.J.'s Bar in Aggieville. 



The blotter 

Arrests in Riley County 

The Colegian takes RporK (fctcdylnvn the 
ftUey County PbteDepir«nentidaly logs. 
The CoRegiw does not 1st wheel loda or tnhwi; 

traffic violations because 0^ space cwstraims. : 

Wednesday, Fib. 21 



2-i3 t:RVPrt>QiiiP 

n W D C E 1) R E on R L R N M U X D 
I) \ E U Ml I. R Y V D H L U M C W D 
h H l> li X h F, V M P F^ B Y D H 

1 \1 III (JKOyll H : PLMPL GLBQ.' 

Vwttrdav's t'rvploquip: DRIVING RAPIDLY ON 
A Ml l.ril.ANb' IIICiUVVAY. I SUPPOSE YOU 
WOULD HAVt SOME PASSING THOUGFITS. 
TtMliiy's Cryptikjuip Cluo: C cqiuU W 



24 Saturday 



K-State women's iiasketball 
vs. Iowa State 

Ip.m.Bramlage 

Shown on Foit Sports Network 

The Wildcats play the first of a two game home stretch to 
rvurvd out the regular season, starting with the Cyclones 
Saturday in the annual senior game, 

K-State men's basketball 
at Colorado 

) pm, Coors Events Center; Gouliler, Colo. 
Shown on FSPN Plus 

Watch as the Wildcats take on the Buffaloes. 



25 Sunday 



K-State's College Rodeo 

1 p.m. VMw Arena* 

For this year's annual rodeo, 
fifteen schools will compete in 
events including calf-roping, bar- 
rel racing and bull riding. 

Tickets for adults cost S11 at the 
doors or S10 in advance at vari- 
ous places across town. Weekend 
passes are available for $24. 



•The rodeo will begin at 7:30 Friday night at Weber 
Arena and will continue at 1 p.m. Saturday For more 
information, refer to Page ? of this Issue. 




The planner 

Campus bulletin board 



■ Mortar Board applications are due today They can be 
turned into thie Office of Student Activities and Services. 

■ The Craduat* Students of Economics will be host 

to Dan Gronsbell from Koch Industries at 2:30 p.m. today in 
Waters 348. 

■Ihe Japanese Appreciation Assaciation will meet at 7 

p.m, Wednesday m Union 203 



■ TheStudentHomecomlngCommittee'tssMhlngap- 

plicdnts, PkIi up an applicatiun dt the Alumni Center ur complete 
one online at www.k-state.cm/itudenli/HmMommg.aspit. 
Applications are due today 

Items in the calendar can be published up to three times. To place 
an item in the Campus Calendar, stop by Kedzle ) 16 and fill out a 
form ore-mail the news editor at (o//esronf^J.Jbu.«fu by 11 
am. two days before it Is to njn. 



'.2S00Fwn 
Bureau Road, Lot 164, at 15S pm fcr theft 
Bond was SISOO, 

■ Atory Latnfl McMHm, Junctlan (j|)i 

lUn., at 7 jO pm for battinialnniMi tfamige 
to property and wftiKssAdctbnlrttiiiiMoa 
Bond was $1,000. 

■ PMNp Smryw, Mlrtneapdis, Kan, at 8 
pja for Mure to appear. Bond v«% S7S0. 

■ Tracie Lynn Kimtann, 3100 Heritage 
Court, no. 85, at 8:50 p^m, for a wortNtss ched.^ 
Bond was S199. 7 

■ Cwtit Attn Bolin9er, tm address ^m. at 

10:45 pm. for probation violations. Bond was 
S5,250. 

nHinday,Feb.22 

■ AMfMfiy )»seph Anguiaiw, 3te Mom 

St, at 12:56 a m for iHttery d^amsl a law 
enforfemeni officer and obstruction of the 
legal process. Bond was S1,000. 

• Lkandn EveBnindtdfe, Htohinqton, 

Kan,, at 1 :2S a.m for possession of an opiate or 
narcotic unlawliil pouession of a depi^m 
and driving witti a onceled or suspended 
license. Bond was $2,000, 



Corrections and 
clarifications 



: 'i 



There were two emxs in Thursday^ Collegian,^ 
Fomier President Bill Clinton will present the ~ 
Landon Lecture March 2. Sl^hanie Rinikef is ~ 
a tiormer employee of Hair Expert Salon and ^ 
Spa. The Collegian regrets these etrors. ^ 

If you see something that should be iomatir- 
a\\ news editor Alex Peak at (78S} 532-^556 £ 
ore-mail atlegiaiu^ipu)}.k5tt.e(tu. ~ 



Kansas State Collegian 

(USPS 291 020) The Kansas State Col- 
legian, a student newspaper at Kansas 
State University, is published by Student 
Publications Inc, Ked^ie )03, Manhat- 
tan, KS 66S06. The Collegian is published 
weekdays during the school year and 
on Wednesdays during the summer. 
Periodical postage is paid at Manhattan, 
KS 66S02. POSTMASTER: Send address 
changes to Kansas State Collegian, 
circulation desk, Kedzie 103, Manhattan, 
KS 66506-7167. 
C Kanus State Cotlegian, 2007 




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Friday, Feb. 23,2007 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 3 



Cadets compete 
in desert marathon 



ly Eric Davii 

MMSASSUIECOLLEGIAN 

Several ROTC cadeU will 
travel to White Sands Mis- 
sile Range in New Mexico 
to compete in a marathon 
to commemorate the Bataan 
Death March in the Philip- 
pines during World War 11. 

The cadets are training 
for the Bataan Memorial 
Death March, which will 
take place March 25 in New 
Mexico. Alex Balk, senior in 
civil engineering, is captain 
of the heavy team. 

The heavy team will 
run the 26.2 miles of the 
marathon with at least a 
35-pound rucksack Balk 
laid he works his team by 
increasing its road march 
distances every week, 

"We started the training 
by doing an easy 10-mile 
road march," Balk said. 

He said his team would 
be completing a 21-mile 
road march during the next 
three weeks 

Balk also said there were 
several injuries in last year's 
run, and he has changed the 
training schedule this year 



to avoid those injuries. 

Throughout the years, 
the run has gained popular- 
ity in the ROTC program. 

Jerad Under, senior in 
history, is the captain of in- 
other team and will be com- 
peting in his fourth march. 

"The first year we did the 
run, we took five people, 
and that year we took fifth 
place in the military-light 
category," Linder said "The 
following year we sent two 
teams. One team was mili- 
tary co-ed, and they did 
military-light and took third 
place" 

He said 30 to 40 teams 
compete in each event. 

Both Balk and Linder 
talked about how co meting 
in the run is a rewarding ex- 
perience 

Along with the run, sur 
vivors of the actual Bataan 
Death March are invited to 
meet the competitors. 

"The Bataan (Memorial) 
Death March is rewarding 
for ail Americans," Balk 
said. "It is a way for us to 
say thank you and honor 
them for their services to 
America." 



('iuif>n's\ \hiill ittakf mi ttiw re\pectin^ an 
e\lahl'<\hiiHiU tif I'i'tl^lOlt , or prohibiting tin- J ret' 
vxtn isi- tiurvitf: or (ihrid^in^ thf frci'^nm »j 
speech . <>r of Ifu press: o,- tin- rifiln of the 
ptopte pvmvuhfy to (tSSemhle. aiidUi petltWU 
thr (itn't'rntiniiffora nthvss uf firii'vancis. 

First Ainendnit'iit 

1 .S. ( ONSnil HON 



APARTMENT HUNTING 101 

Most Locations Near KSU 



,:.>vu^% 




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You can WALK to: 

Oass • Library 
Aggievifte • Banks 
Restaurants • Coffee Shops 
Watering Holes (NO DUIs) 



Clean 1-2-3-4 BR Apaitments, 
Duplexes, and Houses 

DOMT SKIP CLASS BECAUSE YOU 
CAMT FIND A PARKIMC SPAOif 

SERI0U3 STU DENn R ENrWfTH: 

iMloom properly ^lanag^meni 

SINCE 1971 

view our property starting the 19th -28th 

www.moorepropertymanagement.com 
Lease signing begins Feb. 26th 

785-537-0205 





Coming Soon to 

ManHattan Arts Center 



February 23-25, March 1-4 



Proof By David Auburn 
hrected by fiavid Smit 

starring: Ptichael Donnelly i 

Allison Kamowskii Andrea Huckabai 

and Brant Sizenore 

sponsored by Philip and Jeune Kirmser 

Military and Student discounts available 
■Thursday 7:30 pm, Friday & Saturday 8 pm, Sunday 2 pm 



February 23 at 5-7 pm 



Opening reception: David Barttett "Photogravures' 
and artists frorri Meadowlark Hills 

E)(hibit dales February 24 - AprM 7 
MAC galteries are tree and open to the public 



February 25 & 26 at 6 -10 pm 



Auditions: Into t|fe W)ods 

Parts available (or men and women 16 arKl up 
Have te baiB of mui*c prepared to smg. 

Performance dates Apt 27-29 A May 3-6 
Sponsored by Owis Grosli 



Let Them Eat Cake! 



Calling All BakersI 

Enter the first 'Let Them Eat Cake' contest, tasting. 

and auction Interested tjai^ers and decorators 

should contact the Manhattan Arts Center at 537-4420 I 



For more information or to ,_ 
ORDER YOUR TICKETS ONLINE 

www, manh.itt3narts.org 




MauaUTkmun, 
atsocMa praltM«r of 
miwtCMnr and phytl- 
ology, and Daryl Troyvf, 
profauor of anatomy and 
phyilohigy, racalvoda 
$ ) 00,000 grant from Joan's 
Ltgacy for gene therapy 
research for f^hting lur>g 
cancer 

Oirlftepltar Hanawtndwl 

COlLEdMM 



Stem-cell research grant helps professors 



BjrWNIowWiniamMn^ 

KANSAS St«E(OUEGIAN 

Masaaki 'Tunura and Deryl TVoyef have 
spent a lot of time working together They 
finish each other's sentences and seem to 
anticipate what the other is going to say. 

Their years of work together are bc^- 
ning to pay off. 

Joan's Legacy, a lui^ cancer founda- 
tion, recently proented Tbnura, associate 
professor of anatomy and physiology, and 
Th)yer, professor of anatomy and physiol- 
ogy, with a $100,000 grant for their gene- 
therapy research for fighting lung cancer. 

The Joan Scarangello Foundation to 
Conquer Lung Cancer is committed to 
fitting the leading deadliest cancer by 
funding innovative research and increasing 
awareness, according to the organization's 
Web site, amJW.joamlegftcy.org. 

K-State's Tfeny C. Johnson Center for 
Basic Cancer Research was the first source 
of funding for the pair's research 

"We are very indebted to the Johnson 
center,' TVoyer said. 





The pair's research utilizes a type of stem 
cell discovered at K-Stste called umbilical 
cord matrix stem cells, or UCMS cells. They 
are isolated from Wharten's jelly, the cush- 
ioning material of the umbilical cord. 

CancnDus tumora send out signals that 
recruit other cells to help grow, TToyer said. 
The UCMS cells, en^eered with tumor- 
fighting chemicals, respond to that signal 
and travel to where the tumor is, but in- 
stead of helpiitg the tumor grow, the cells 
begin to fight it. 

"It's sort of like if you smell coffee some- 
where, and you follow the smell, and the 
smell gets stronger as you move closer and 
soon you find yourself in front of the coffee 
pot," TVoyer said 

The difference between this type of can- 
cer therapy and other types is that gene 
therapy is cancer-targeted, TYoyer said. 
Other types of therapy cause harmful ef- 
fects to the rest of the body while fighting 
the cancer. Cancer-targeted gene therapy 
only fights the cancer. 

Thiyer and Tkmura test the effective- 
neta of their research by wei^iing the limp 



of treated and untreated mice. Cancerous 
lungs weigh about twice as much as healthy 
lungs, T^mura said. After they treat the can- 
cerous lungs, the weight of the lurig will re- 
turn almost completely to normal. 

The therapy is not 100-percent effective, 
but 'Dunura said the tumors almost com- 
pletely disappear. TYoyer said the change is 
significant 

Tkmura and TYoyer said their long-term 
goal is to use cancer-toiigeted gene therapy 
to cure cancer in humans They already 
have had a strategic meeting with members 
of the Umversity of Kansas Medical Center 
to plan what must be done before they are 
able to obtain their goal. 

The researchers also hope to use the 
gene therapy for other types of cancer. They 
are focusiitg only on lung cancer because it 
has the highest mortality rate, Ttaiura said. 

Other researchers involved in this proj- 
ect include Duane Davis, professor of 
animal science and industry; Mark Weiss, 
professor of anatomy and physiology; and 
David Grieger, associate professor of ani- 
mal science and industry. 




^, 



J ci> uJ i=t rsj I 



r 1 I I .1 1 '. ^. » I ^ 1 f - ? 

r>4vertlity Cbfiltlftii Church 

JB0OCI<fl)n<776M4O 

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Child Cm (TwkfcH 

A WclcoDikii Coofrcplxn. 

Rev Miduel Nclxn 

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6- 



MANHATTAN 

MENNONITE CHURCH 

tOO() Fremont 5W-4(ng 

Worship; 10:45 SS: 9:30 
Rkhud A BirtNU* C«t)riag, Puton 

K-St«tc Studeot Oroup 

www.imiitBtt an.b.m.intnnoiuic.Dei 



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lActwonhip 



Muslim 

Student 

Association 

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liil yinuh A«». M«nh»iin 

Ereryoae mrltome! 
www. nitBhttUiiJcwUttcoiig.org 

In auttri«ilan with HILLEL 

tkf |rwl>h tmdfiH ordinjiailan 

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CrossRoads '^"-'•^^ 




ITRST BAPTIST CHI RCH 

2121 Blue Hilb Road 

5A9-8691 

9.45 ani Sunday School 

) 1 IX) am Sunday Worship 

Praise Team Twia- t':.tt.)i Month 



Baptist Campus Csntsr 

1801 Anderson Ave 539-3051 



Faith Evan^«licsl Five Church 

•Worship at 8:00,10:30, 
10:40 

• Sunday School at 9:1 5 

kwAndmon *suc P«iD> 



1«IB«mMiid w-|- 



\ 6Mil«Norlh 
of Kimball 

776-2066 




St. Isidore's 

Catholic Student 

Center 

MASS SCHEDULE 

Tuesday-Thursday 10:(X) p.m. 

Friday 12:10 p.m. 

Saturday 5 p.m. 

Sunday 9:30 a.m., 11 am. 

Sun. 4:30 p.m., 6 p.m. 
Father Keith Weber, Chaplain 

711 Denison 539-7496 



"^j 






Svaiwt 

S.MVe Ttbkt Fflknnritir 
?M^ Viii TiKk AitnciMa 

Wednctdqn 



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Baptist 
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2901 ItuiiHu ihllu E ofSithCltlkt 

♦ Sunday Worship ♦ 
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HihkCiivwrri^.lOorllUUim 
Fvf ning ScrvKC iii Lire C<lli6 p.m. 

785-776-0424 
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9tl5 i.111. ^KbraUp Ser«i» 

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unity 

church of Manhattan 

A growing spirituaicomnumitv 

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ECM Building 1021 Denison 

Contact Rev. Jennrfer 
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fit Churth of the Mutrwi*] 
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Welcome 
to 

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Sunday Worth Ip 

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ag« 

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CHURCHl 

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Peace Lutheran Church 

Worship Sunday i> 
3^^^ 8;.W and 11:00 

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2500 KimM 

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With Christ . . .Gather . . . 

Grow and Go Forth! 



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URCH 
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f "ajuil dfcsn, free Awiut!! 

Sunday School- 9;45aflr 

Communiatt Strive 



OPINION 



Page 4 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, Feb. 23, 2007 



History of Mardi Gras 

Since you have to live life anyway, you might as well get drunk for a week 



In my home state of Louisiana, 
the Ssint-cheering masses spent the 
last week in the throes of the great- 
est of all festivals, 
Mardi Gras. which 
for the uncultured, 
loosely translates 
from French as 
"Fat Tuesday." 

Fortunately, 
Louisianans are 
far manlier than 
the French (where 

the snooty French 

drink mostly sis- 

sifed red wines, any proper Loui- 
siana native prefers a nice manly 
blush, fresh from the box) Though 
the Cajuns bor- 




rowed th« French language, they 
added their own dialect. As such, 
the Cajun translation of Mardi Gras 
is roughly, "the week everyone 
stays home, tourists get schlizted, 
40 people are murdered and the 
'Girls Gone Wild' crew shows up" 

A long time ago, the delta 
country down south was where 
everyone went if they were quite 
sure they didn't want to be found. 
Runaway slaves, outlaw American 
Indians, pirates, people sneaking 
out of Mexico early hoping to beat 
the rush, and so forth. 

Well, then more and more of the 
French came in, preachin' and 
hollerin' and bashing people 
over the hi^ad with the 



cross, and the locals figured if they 
were going to be a city of hookers, 
cutthroats and thieves they might 
as well gel them some Jesus if the 
church was going to dole it out for 
free anyway. 

The French, being good Catho- 
lics, started handing out holidays 
until the next thing you know, 
every day was the Feast of Saint 
So-and-so, or the Mass of Saint 
Done-forgot Everything rolled 
along fine until up popped Lent, 
during which everyone fasts and 
abstains and generally goes about 
making everyone else miserable for 

Despite trying 
to weasel their 



way around it, the Catholics told 
all the southern locals they was 
hell-bound if they didn't go along 
with the whole misery and pen- 
ance thing. Figuring there's not 
much booze in hell and not too 
many brothels either, the locals 
decided to tag along with the whole 
plan. But. if there was going to be 
40 days of praying and purifying 
they were going to make sure they 
earned every last second. 

So before Lent began on Ash 
Wednesday, the residents of New 
Orleans (and most of the Caribbean 
lor more-or-less the 



y 




same reasons) decided they were 
going to spend a few days getting 
Uquored up. beating the stuffing out 
of each other and doing the hori- 
zontal boogie until the bishop came 
down and told them all to knock it- 
off and get themselves to church. ' 
Fat Tuesday, they decided to call it " 

The locals celebrated a little old- 
timey godlessness, which is at least 
somehow more respectable than 
modern-day folk - singing praise 
day in and out before they slink 
off for more cheating and lying. At 
least New Orleans never put on 
airs to be anything but a den of infl- 
dels 

Since then, the whole affair 
devolved into another marketing 
Ponzi scheme. Even that hotbed of 
wild culture, Bangor, Maine, has 
cut itself a little slice of the Mardi 
Gras pie. 

Now, lots of the European 
nations, in a desperate attempt 
ro prove they re not a bunch of 
uptight, middle-aged, white folks, 
have whipped out their party hats, 
even if they arc dusty after a few 
good centuries in the closet 

So if New Orleans has taught 
us anything (other than don't build 
below sea level) it's that everybody 
needs a good heathening every now 
and again, and Mardi Gras seems 
hke as good a time as any 

If nothing else. Mardi Gras is a 
good rennndcr to relax once in a 
while, because tomorrow you could 
be hungry, sober and miserable 



l«nas Hoqi ii itnior In sodologif, intcrnaltonal 
iludief and Rusiian. Please send comments to 



Breach of gym etiquette can cause serious embarrassment 



There's something about gynis 
that makes me squirm a bit. Maybe 
it's the attire (barely there) or the 
smell (sweaty. 
body -odor good- 
ness). I can't help 
but be uncomfort- 
able - I was raised 
Catholic, and it's 
what we Catholic 
girls do well. 

My awkward- 
ness always is 

put at bay if I use 

proper manners, 

so 1 practice what I consider quality 
gym etiquette: I remain mute unless 
forced to speak and /or interact. Do- 
ing so helps keep my workout anxi- 
ety at bay Yet somehow, despite best 
efforts and a positive attitude, 1 was 




shamed into oblivion last Tuesday 
night 

As i was bounding up the stairs, 
averting my eyes, someone crept into 
my personal space 1 moved faster, 
hoping to abstain from any further 
interruption, and then I suw him in 
my peripheral vision Behind me was 
this man, maybe 30 years old or so, 
who clearly had nut graduated from 
"Gym Etiquette 101." 

He wore a white, very tight 
men's undershirt (tighter than even 
I would wear and I'm a chick) and 
running "shorts " wahing over his 
sinewy legs 

Most sane men at the gym or in 
the weight room wear those basket- 
ball-type shorts that hit at or below 
the knee 

Not this guy. He was going fur 



a different look, a subtle look - he 
went for the light-grccn, almost 
white short shorts, sans built-in 
underwear Fashionable, really. 

Completely freaked out, I imme- 
diately snapped back to strict face- 
forward stance, eyes focused on my 
goal - avoiding this guy all logether 
I took a right, hoping my intuition 
would not fail - he totally would be 
going to the combative room with 
that snazzy outfit, right? "Of couree 
I'm correct because I know every- 
thing," 1 almost said out loud 

Feeling this skirmish was behind 
me, I sought to concentrate on 
my pre-squat stretches I had my 
headphones m, set my massive purse 
down along with my water bottk" 
and Rockhurst swealshin and bent 
down lo re tie my shoe. At this point 



I'd forgotten all about the pecu- 
liar man in the skimpy outfit and 
concetitrated on doing the loop-de- 
loop while listening to Missy Elliott. 
I danced a little and lied my shoes, 
bent over, dcrriere up in the air, 
oblivious to my surroundings I fin- 
ished tying and got into a side lunge 
position to stretch my inner thighs (1 
take squats seriously) I moved into 
this spread- legged stance and leaned 
to one side, eyes focused on Ihe 
floor 

Then something moved out ol the 
comer of my eye- ii was none other 
than the gentleman, in a half-squal 
ting/half-sitling plie position, shorts 
gapuig, balls swinging. Not just sit- 
ling there - swinging, like Muham- 
mad Ali iust used his scrotum as a 
punching bag. 



This was an awkward circum- 
stance, indeed. You know what I 
did"^ 1 screamed. |ust a little bit, but 
I lei out a yelp because I was put in 
such a foul situation. I squeezed my 
eyes shut, breathing hard, praying lu 
have Ihe image erased from my mind 

- God please answer my prayers 

- and stood up straight. 

My eyes were still closed as I 
turned around, gathered my things 
and proceeded to leave, because the 
traumatic event had grossed mc out 
so much I was unconcerned about 
working my glules. 

As I drove home, I vowed never 
to use my peripheral vision again. 



iHh Sind Ii 4 Hnlor In Interlsr aichltecture. 
Pletie itni comments to $pialoiii^ipub.kiu.tdii. 



fk /"^K A N S A S S T A I t 

^ LOLLEGIAN 



rttmnmiticHiLf 

H*ldl Nut ion I Wki^iKG EOtroo 

W«i Ntk I N{W tciiw 

J*C4u* H wg K CI (0" UIK 

InU Htmtnan | (0 COnoxiF 

SconGtPHd|(«UiVi(aTM 

La«>n C. Aa«mt \ HEIDOEDim 

LK*y 0. Macluy ] i EttuttS EDiTOII 

Jonithun fiarttn | ti>giltHOIIOII 

Cadrkiti* FItfflming | imti EMIM 

EIIhti laui I IH( EDGE ED'TM 

>»nti Hoot K'''^ '"<>'> i^'M 

Chrttlophar HtntwIntM I ^QIOEDITCK 

■ftfldan PFMflor | fHEiENTtliDNCOiTCIt 

t»ft9 HtfTW* I ONUNE EDITM 

DonnltLM|E>miCtO<IM 

CMftnty Sltypon I KDMANMCR 



WRITE TO US 

Uttm can b* submitted by e-tiMilto tettm^ 
ipub-hatdu, or in pfrson to Kedzie 116. Pkut 
include your full name, yf ar in school jnd major, 
letten should b« limited to 250 words. All 
jubmittwl lenen mtf be edited (of tength and 
clanty. 



CONTACT US 

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UHlk 103 Manhattan, KS 66S02 

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«ww)f^bu.fdu 



TO THF POINT I ™'"^ ^'''^ '* '" editorial selected and debated by the editorial board and written after a majoiity 
IV 1 1 IL I Win I I opinion is formed. This Is the Collegian's official opinion. 

Opportunities exist to support fellow students 



"There is nothing to do." 

"I'm bored." 

These are lame excuses, 
because at any given time, 
dozens of events occur on our 
campus, and each is another 
chance to learn or experience 
something new. 

This Friday, the K-State 
Rodeo begins at 7:30 p.m. 
Even at an agricultural school 
like ours, many students 
have not experienced rodeo. 
This is a great opportunity to 
learn about something that 
is important to many K-State 
students 

If one is unable to attend 
Friday, the rodeo lasts through 
the weekend, starting at 1 p.m. 
both Saturday and Sunday, 

Also this weekend, K- 
State's Speech Unlimited 
forensics team will host the 



Kevin Heinemann Memorial 
Swing on Saturday and Sun- 
day 

Both events are worthwhile 
opportunities to support fel- 
low students. These people 
work hard throughout the 
semester, if not their entire 
collegiate careers, and prob- 
ably would be tickled to have 
your encouragement. 

While the forensics team 
and the rodeo club caught our 
attention for this issue, there 
are always other events on 
campus and in the community 
to keep folks occupied. 

Check the calendar on the 
K-State home page for events 
within your interests. 

Those who enjoy music, 
dance or theater can check for 
what is going on at McCain 
Auditorium, Nichok Theatre 



or the Manhattan Arts Center, 

Just because some varsity 
teams are away competing 
does not mean there are no 
athletics events going on A 
plethora of club sports teams 
practice and play in Memorial 
Stadium, including lacrosse 
and rugby 

The options are endless. 
At 1 p.m. Saturday, there will 
be an International PotJuck 
Dinner at Frith Community 
Center Other multicultural 
and religious events occur 
throughout each week. 

"Nothing is going on" is not 
acceptable. This is a college 
campus. More than 20,000 
people are busy with events 
every day of every week. 

Find one and attend. You 
could find a way to enrich 
your life. 



TH E FORUM 

fomm@spub.ksu.edu 

The Forum It tht Call*gl«n1( r*Ml«r iMdlwck 
lyittni. th( Forum li edited to tllmlnitt *ul}<(, 
rtclit, obKWe ind llbaloui [oniintnli. Th( 
CMnmints ir« not tht opinion at tht (ojltfiin 
Mir ire llwy (ndoned by th* rdKofl*! itatT. 



Does anybody understand 'Tabernacle Woodi^' I 
have to lay ttijt it is the worn comK strip I ha« 
ewf read Sony but how aliout a littlt "Far Side," 
orewn (krfteld?" 

IUNIODI*l^imC«lKIENCE 

Two iwifFini art bailing in the own. The fiist 
muffin turns lo Itie sefonij and says, "Wow, its hot 
In here Ihf sKond muffin leplies, 'Holy crap, a 
talking muffini' 

SOt^OHODE IK EUCtltKJtL ENGIHELEtING 

Oarwins itieory ofetolutfon has never induded 
the idra tfiat'tiumanicieKended from apes," 
Apes are Ilk out cousins, not our grandparents. 

CwoUrM CtMpnMK 

SENIOR IN *NtHROPaiW 



Nnm tend tubmnuoni vb K-SlMt e-nuil t» 
Arwni'vutLtiu.tiAf, AH ciinunenis mwt *« ligned. 



h 



V' 



Friday, Feb, 23, 2007 



KANSAS SWECOLLEGfAN 



Pages 



WORLD NEWS 




4 GUATEMAUN OFFICERS 
ARRESTED IN PARLIAMENT 
MEMBERS' SLAYING 

GUATEMALA CITY - A 
top police official and three 
other officers were arrested 
Thursday for the killings of 
three Central American Par- 
liament members, including 
the son of the alleged founder 
uf El Salvador's death squads. 

Among (hose arrested was 
Luis Arturo Herrera, head of 
the Guatemalan National Po- 
lice organized crime unit, said 
Interior Minister Carlos Vief- 
man. 

The assailants repeatedly 
shot Eduardo D'Aubuisson, 
son of El Salvador's late 
right-wing leader Roberto 
D'Aubuissun, two other Sal- 
vadoran officials and their 
driver before setting them on 
fire while they were still alive, 
(jfficials said. 

Their charred bodies were 
found Monday along a road 
about 20 mites southeast of 
Guatemala City. 



U.S. MILITARY DISCOVERS 
PROPANE AND CHLORINE 
CAR BOMB FACTORY 

BAGHDAD, Iraq - The 
U.S. military warned Thursday 
insurgents are adopting new 
tactics in a campaign to spread 
panic after troops uncovered 
a car bomb factory with pro- 
pane tanks and chlorine cylin 
ders - possible ingredients for 
more chemical attacks follow- 
ing three explosions involving 
chlorine. 

Those blasts and a recent 
spate of attacks against helicop- 
ter) have raised fean that insur- 
gents are trying to develop new 
ways to confront U.S. and Iraqi 
forces. Any increase in chemical 
bombings could complicate the 
Baghdad security crackdown, 
which is in its second week. 

Lt. Gen. Ray Odiemo, the 
No, 2 American commander in 
Iraq, said he did not think the 
attacks signaled a more capable 
insurgency. Instead, he said 
they merely were an attempt to 
provoke fear. 



EUROPE, RUSSIA AGREE 
TO ENCOURAGE IRAN 
BACK TO 6-PARTY TALKS 

BERLIN - U.S., European 
and Russian diplomats agree 
on encouraging Iran back to 
the bargaining table over its 
disputed nuclear program. 
Secretary of State Condoleez- 
za Rice said Thursday, 

Diplomats from the US. 
and its negotiating partners 
plan to meet next week to tiy 
drafting a new U.N resolution 
on the standoff 

"We reconfirmed we will 
use available channels and 
the Security Council to try to 
achieve that goal" of restarting 
negotiations with Iran, the top 
U.S. diplomat said. 

The group reviewed Iran's 
compliance with a U.N. Se- 
curity Council demand that it 
stop enriching uranium, a key 
step toward producing either 
nuclear power or a nuclear 
weapon 

— Tkt A»od«tt4 Prtu 



USDA to change to meat, poultry inspection process 

make sure a budget shortfall 
is not what's driving these im- 
portant inspection decisions." 

Marsden said the USDA is 
not driven by the budget but 
instead is trying to bring all of 
its plants to a high level of ac- 
countability. 

"They want to bring all 
plants up lo the level in com- 
pliance with regulations,' 
Marsden said "It really makes 
a lot of sense and I agree with 
what the USDA is doing by 
putting their limited resources 
on plants that rely on systems 
that aren't as reliable." 

More than 7,000 inspectors 
conduct nearly nine million 
inspections per year, accord- 
ing to the USDA. 

Daily inspections of meat 
and poultry plants are re- 
quired by federal law and have 
been since unsanitary condi- 
tions in Chicago's meat pack- 
ing institute were portrayed in 
Upton Sinclair's 1906 novel, 
"The Jungle." Ahhough the 
industry is well-funded and 
expansive, Marsden said in- 
creasing accountability and 
safety is an integral issue 

"We have thousands of 
people in the United States 
that dieyearly of a food-borne 
disease," Marsden said, "All of 
those deaths are preventable, 
and the technologies are there 
to control this hazard, so it's a 
good public health endeavor 
for our country" 



ByMlkvKdIy 

MNSASSmiECOLLEGIItN 

The first significant chang- 
es to the inspection of meat 
and poultry plants in a decade 
will take effect this year, the 
Department of Agriculture 
announced last week. 

These new policies will tar- 
get factories where the danger 
for germs is high and where 
past visits have found unsafe 
practices. 

"There are certain food 
products that carry a higher 
inherent risk than others," 
said Richard Raymond, the 
USDA's top food safety of- 
ficial in an Associated Press 
interview "And there are cer 
tain plants that do a better job 
of controlling risk than oth- 
ers." 

The USDA will evaluate 
both slaughter and processing 
plants on a risk -based system, 
considering both the type of 
product and the plant's re- 
cord of food safety violations. 

This risk-based system will 
be the first significant over 
haul of food safety inspection 
since 1993, when hundreds 
uf people became ill and four 
children died after eating un- 
dercooked hamburgers from 
Jack in the Box restaurants 

The USDA has not set a 
timetable for the shift to the 
new system, but is expected 
to release one soon. As of 



now, the new system will be 
implemented in processing 
plants, with future endeavors 
in slaughtering plants. 

"There's been a lot of food 
borne disease and recalls as- 
sociated with lysteriosis at 
processing plants, and there's 
a major push by the federal 
government to reduce Ihe 
cases in the United States," 
said lames Marsden, distin- 
guished professor in animal 
sciences and industry 

K-State has both slaughter 
and processing capabilities 
but stays mostly in process- 
ing, Marsden said. 

"We process not only for 
research and teaching, but 
also there is processing that 
provides ground beef to the 
dorms, for example," Marsden 
said. "There's a fair amount of 
processing thai goes on here" 

Due to its stellar track re- 
cord, K-state's facilities will 
have fewer inspections, al 
lowing the USDA lo spend 
its resources where they are 
most needed. 

However, some critics ar- 
gue the department is rushing 
into a complex system in an 
effori to loosen its budget. 

"One of the concerns is 
that this is simply an effort to 
save money in a tight business 
year," said Caroline Smith De 
Waal, food safety director at 
the Center for Saience in the 
Public Interest. "We want to 



FROM THE PRESIDENT 

Students should listen carefully to candidates 



The extended forecast for 
Manhattan says the weather 
will stay warm, but if it drops 
back down to zero, 
at least the trees will 
be warm and the 
sidewalk decorations 
will add a splash of 
color to campus. 

That's right - it's 
election time. 

Student Gov- 
erning Association 
campaigns are in full " 

twing. 

Candidates have been and 
will be speaking at your stu- 
dent organization meetings, 
your living organizations and 




LUCAS 
MADDY 



events around camptu. 

There will be tables in the 
Union, chalk on the side- 
u^lks and posters 
hugging trees for the 
next two weeks. 

Listen to what can- 
didates say and vote 
according to your 
perceptions. 

SGA handles mil- 
lions of your tuition 
dollars each year, 
allocating to stu- 
dent groups, creating new 
programs and supporting a 
proud K-State tradition 

Tbke two minutes to vote 
next week and express your 



Kjiim?, Stjif Inivritiln 






opinions. These indvidiuals 
represent the entire K-State 
community on a local, state 
and national stage, so take 
pride in helping lo choose 
who your student leaders are 
next year. 

If you have any comments 
or questions, please e-mail 
matidy@ksUite.edu. 

Proud to be a Wildcat. 

LucMlMaddy 

SWENtBODVPRtSIOENT 



TO THE EDITOR 

Fans show cruelty in throwing dead poultry 



Editor, 

It is remarkable that, in 
a university where so many 
people work so hard to im- 
prove the weU -being of pets, 
farm animab and wildlife, 



some students feel the need 
to torture and kill a chicken 
and throw its remains on a 
basketball court 

Can somebody explain to 
tnt the need for such wicked 
behavior'f* 1 am disappointed 



that neither the administra- 
tion nor the athletic depart- 
ment commented on an act so 
unbecoming of Wildcat fans 

OtkaUMMn 

PKonssoitoFnEM04 



Wage gap exists regardless of what some say 



Editor, 

Ben Davis' letter to the 
editor reflects the standard 
Republican party position 
about the wage gap: it doesn't 
exist. However, studies show 
this is not the case 

In 2005, women overall 
made 77 cents to a man's dol- 
lar (National Committee on 
Pay Equity, studies full-time, 
year-round employees). In 
1963, women made 58.9 cents 
to their dollar. 

In those 42 years, the 
wage gap has narrowed by 



18.1 cents. Clearly, the pass 
ing of the Equal Pay Act of 
1963 does not mean women 
automatically are immune to 
gender discrimination Studies 
such as these do take into 
account a person's education 
level. Davis argues millions 
of lawsuits would result if the 
wage gap did exist. The largest 
class- action sex discrimina- 
tion lawsuit in history is now 
proceeding as more than 1.6 
million women are challeng- 
ing the unfair wages they are 
paid at Wal-Mart. 

Similar recent lawsuits 



have been brought against 
Boeing, Costco, Merrill Lynch, 
Morgan Stanley and Good- 
year Tire and Rubber 

1 agree it is vital lo move 
beyond "stage one when 
addressing the problems of 
our society;" unfortunately, 
Davis failed to do so Did 
he propose any solutions to 
inequality in his letter beyond 
pretending it didn't exist? 

If so, I missed it. 

StifanI Schndw 

SfNIOfl IN ENGUS>4 UTEAMUn km 
WOMEN S STUDIES 



Switching colors wont equal better basketball 



Editor, 

As a former K-State faculty 
member and proud supporter 
of K-State, I was disappointed 
and upset lo see the black at 
the University of Kansas vs. 
K State ballgame. 



It has taken years to bring 
back "Purple f¥ide" at K-State 
thanks to a great football 
prc^ram under former coach 
Bill Snyder and alumni and 
student support Switching 
colors is not going to build a 
better basketball program. 



It will take the same 
ingredients mentioned above 
to continue "Purple Pride," 
and support from alumni and 
friends of K-State will not 
happen by wearing black, 

Ctortfw GoodhMCI 



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Page 6 



SPORTS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Hill's presence helps attract top recruits 




Calrlna Rawson | (OaE&ltN 
AisliUnt coach Datontt Hill, right, watches the team during a 78-59 victory ov«r Colorado Feb, 10 with coach Bob Huggins, center, and assistant coach Frank Martin Hill 
came to K-State from Charlotte, where he worked as an assistant for Bobby Lutz. 

Assistant coach has ties with potential players throughout East Coast area 



ByJ«frr«]rRakt 

KANSAS STATE (Ollil]IAN 

When Dalonte Hill signed with K- 
State lost April to be an assistant on 
coach Bob Huggins' staff, speculation 
began that he would bring with him a 
special talent. 

Through the years. Hill developed a 
strong relationship with Michael Beas- 
ley, considered by some scouting agen- 
cies to be the No. 1 higli schtxjl player 
in the class of 2007 

Beasley originally made a verbal 
commitment to Charlotte, where Hill 
spent four seasons as an assistant un- 
der coach Bobby Lutz from 2003 to 
2006 

When Hill boiled for K-State. Beas 
ley wasn't far behind. 

Beasley decided to back out of his 
verbaJ commitment to Charlotte and 
publicly reopened his recruitment 



Suddenly, K-State entered the picture, 
and the rest is history Beasley signed a 
national letter of intent Nov. 8 and will 
be a Wildcat next season. 

So without his connection to Beas- 
ley, would Huggins still have been in- 
terested in adding Hill to his stafi? 

"I've known coach Huggins for 
a while I've played against him and 
coached against him, so I've known 
him a long time," said Hill, who also 
played at Charlotte from 1998 to 2000 
"With that said, f think I've already ex- 
pressed thai I've wanted to coach with 
him. and he said when he had an op- 
portunity that he'd hire me." 

Thou^ Hit] admitted Huggins 
knew signing Beasley was a possibility, 
he also knew it wasn't certain. 

"He knew it was doable," Hill said. 
'I told him I couldn't guarantee it. I 
hadn't spoken with Mike, It wasn't in 
stone that Mike was coming with me, 



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and that's why he opened up his re- 
cruitment." 

Now that Beasley is coming to K- 
State, it's possible Hill could be Hug- 
gins' pipeline to players from the East 
Coast He spent lime as an Amateur 
Athletic Union coach for the DC. As- 
sault and has contacts all along the 
eastern seaboard. 

"I think we'll get it rolling and keep 
h rolling," Hill said of recruiting "I 
think were pretty stong in the East 
Coast with Frank (Martin) in Miami. 
Huggins in Cincinnati and me in 



Washington, DC. Virginia and North 
Carolina." 

His recruiting ties aside. Hill also 
can coach He mostly works with the. 
guards and has developed close bonds 
with the players similar to the one he 
has with Beasley. 

"Whenever you arc a young coach, 
you can relate to the players," said 
senior Akeem Wright "His experi- 
ence, coaching al Charlotte, he's really 
shown some promise here. He's played 
college ball and knows what we're go- 
ing through when we're struggling." 

Hill, only 28 years old, acknowl- 
edged his goal is to become a head 
coach. Still, he said he's in no hurry. 
He wants to team under Huggins and 
help KSiate get back on track 

The Wildcats, vommg off a 71-62 
home loss to No 6 Kansas Monday, 
play ne.Kt at Colorado at 3 p.m. Satur- 
day in Boulder. Colo. 



K-State looks to even series with Iowa State for senior day 



By Dayn« Logan 

KANSAS SIATKOLlfGtAN 

The K-State women's basketball 
team will close out the regular season 
with a two-game homesland at Bram- 
lage Coliseum The first game takes 
place Saturday at 1 p.m. when the 
Wildcats (16-11, 4-10 Big 12 Confer- 
ence) play Iowa State (20-7, 8-6). 

The No 25 Cyclones are led by 
sophomore Nicky Wieben, Wieben av- 
erages more than 12 points per game, 
which has helped Iowa Slate pick 
up momentum as the postseason ap- 
proaches Iowa State has won three 
games in a row, including a victory 
against then-No 13 Texas A&M. 

The Wildcats, on the other hand, 
have nose-dived for the last live weeks 
and. apart from the Big 12 Tbuma- 
ment, might not see the postseason 
at all. Coach Deb Patterson said she 
thought some of ihe Wildcats' strug- 
gles could be attributed to playing the 
wrong teams at the wrong times. 

"We have tended to bump up against 
teams when they are on a run," Patter- 
son said. "We have tended to bump up 
against them when they're playing their 
very best basketball and when they've 
strung together a couple of wins" 

Unfortunately for K-State. it won't 
get any easier this weekend against 
an Iowa State squad that is hitting its 
stride. 

"Iowa Slate's a good team " said ju- 
nior Shana Wheeler 'We feel like we 



K-State vs. Iowa State 

When: I p.m. Sdtunjay 2^B 

Where: er^mlage Colisewn ^H| 

Televbion: Fox Sporti Networit ^^ 

Radki:KMAN'AM1J50 

Internet Live st*b on k-itatapontami 

have a good chance, but we just have 
to play two halves of good basketball." 

Putting together two good halves 
has been something the Wildcat wom- 
en have talked about all season, but has 
been easier said than done K-State has 
had its share of good spells in recent 
games, but inconsistency caused the 
team to drop many of those games. 

With all the heartbreak the team 
has experienced this season, it's hard 
to tell what is left to play for 

Freshman Ashley Sweat said the 
disappointing season has left her play- 
ing with a "nothing left to lose" atti- 
tude 

"You might as well come out and 
give it your best every day," Sweat 
said. 

Two other Wildcats likely will play 
with a similar attitude this weekend. 
Seniors Claire Coggins and Naytanda 
Smith will be recognized for their years 
of service to the Wildcat program as 
part of senior day and will undoubt- 
edly be looking to leave the fans with 
something to remember. 

"I'm hoping we can get a great crowd 
in the house for senior afternoon and 
send off Claire Coggins and Naytanda 
Smith in a big way," Patterson said. 




Clatr* 

Coggins 

shoots 

from the 
top of the 
key against 
Kansas 
testate 
Vill look 
to recover 
from its loss 
to Missouri 
when it 
IS host to 
Iowa State 
Saturday. 

Chrittophar 
Han«wlnck«l 

COlLtUAN 



Friday, Feb, 23, 2007 

1-MINUTE 
DRILL 

Staff Reports 

RUN I K-State prefures for Big 
12 Indoor diampjonships 

Abi before ttw Biq 12 ConfwwKe Indoor 
ChvnpiorKhip meet, sophorrmf vm^ht 
thnwH Loim Grows TKeived Uie Big 12 fmulp 
jtMete of the mtk beuus« of her flrst-place 
ton of 6ia-3 3/4 ^ th« KSU Open last Mek. 

This mdiend she and the rest of thf K-Stitr 
trad Md Md twn «v (raveling Id Antes, 
Iowa, lor tt« ig t2 Indoor Ournpionships 

Couch OtffRowlto said he is toolung forwanj 
totfwblgnwft. 

Tl you got 4 puke, imrte going to be wady,' 
fkwttosaid. 

Grows owns the tongest throw in (he Big 12 
this jwr while teammate iao Ma Is in third 
with a toss of 6S 1/2. 

Sophomore Kayiene Wagrver will aimpMe 
lr» the womeo's high jump and has the second- 
highest jump in tfJe conference with a msrV of 
5-1 1/4. 

Sophomore Scott Sellers also ranks second in 
the Big 1 2 with a malt of 7- S V4 in the mefl^ 
high jump. 

The two kids that are teading the country 
in those evene are in our conference," Rovelto 
Mid 'h doesn't mean that they can't win, but 
It does mean that they have to jump wry wry 
well to win,' 

— Rynttlfitt 



6BC|Baset>allteamt0|>lay 
4 games at Buckeye Cbusk 

Baseball coach Brad Hill wasnt lully satisfied 
aftergoing)-! last weekend. 

Hut^ why he wants mote th«i just inprowd 
play this weelwfld at tfie Budteye Qassicln 
Tampa, Ha. 

It Is a devekipmental stage for us, but we 
are going to win,' Hi said "We're going down 
to win and hope our guys leam how to win In 
those sitiations.' 

This is the second tnp of an 1 1 -game load 
swing ftirK-Sbte. 

1 think it Is good (0 put our guys out on 
theroad,'HBIsaid.'lthinl(itisgoodfrDmthe 
standpoint of learning how to play on the road 
and I also think there are fewer distrsctBns 
sonwtimes wtten you go on the road' 

The bullpen was one of the keys to last 
weekend's victories. K State's relievers are 1 -0 
with a 1 .46 ERA. They have three sanies in three 
opportunities, hoUing opponents loaM 
batting average. 

The WWots will play Seton Hall Hday, a 
doufaNieadef against Ohio State Satuiday 
and ima Madison Sunday. They will play alt 
of their gimes in the New *rk Yankee spring 
training complex. 

Til be fun," senior fllftumlersaW.'ybute 
pJaying on a big league field. You're ptaylng on 
the same fiefal that Detek Jeter (Yankee's short- 
stop) and aH those guys are playing on.* 

^RyntHfitt 

nN I Wildcats to face 2 teams 
without KvaraUkhelta 

The If State tennis team wilt travel to fece 
two opponents this weekend withcwt its Na 2 
singles player. 

Junior Tamar Kvaratsthelia, who was 
sidelined from singles competition last weekend 
vnth an injury, will not paiKcipate. 

'After taking It owr with her medkal stafl 
we deckled the best thing far her w»s fw her 
not to play this wwk," coach Stere Bietau said. 

K-Stae (2-2, CM) Big 12 Conference) will (ace 
Mft 67 Boist State (4- 1 , 2-0 Western Athtetx 
Confciencel Saturday ir Albuguwque, N.M. The 
nam wlil take on Ma 38 New Mexico (40, 
CM) Mountain West Conference) Sunday. 

last weekend, sophomore Fernanda Da Valle 
was the only K- State player to win, beating 
Bngham ^bung in both singles and doubles. 

This («ek, she said she has been working on a 
diflerent aspect of Iter game. 

"I'm trying to keep mentally focused,' she 
said. 'I just want to pJay good as a team We 
want to haw a good start in douWet" 

— WnwyHion 

WEQ I Equestrian starts spring 
season at Baylor, Texas AAM 

The K-State equestrian team will begin the 
sprtng i«gula( season thts weekend in two 

hNd^o4i»d (wnpefltloni * Bajter SahjnJay 

and at Texas A&M Sunday. 

K-Sute wiH send a total of J] riders to 
COT|)* In (he two varsity shows. Some riders 
wf*(WS««al times owr the weekend and 
others will ride as altemates 



BBK I Fomwr K-State athlete, 
student dies at 72 

Juan Tadwi'Vkens, a Latin Americ*i basliet- 
Wl ilir«rffcnnef student-athlete at K-State, 

dW i« hfc home Sunday in Puerto Hko at the 
age of 71 

Weens, a point guard from Ponce, Puerto Rlt^ 
itaned at K-State for two seasons from 1954- 

1»6 under kgendary head coach Tex Winttt 
H* wmgid 12.3 points in 1956 and qoiki 
the WHdtats to the NCAA Regional semifinals 
and a first -place finish in the Big Seven F« his 

caiMt he averaged 1 1.6 poms and over three 
Mbounds per game. 



Friday, Feb. 23, 2007 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page? 




Annual rodeo to feature 15 schools 

Team members hope to qualify for national competition 



CMrifwRMmonlCOllKUN 
Rufty Dandridga of Bacon* G)ll*0« works to stay on a horw during 
the bareback competition at the 2006 K-State rodeo at Webef Arena. 



Campus Phone Books 



ByKrittliiHodffM 

KANSAS smtCOLKGIAN 

Calf-roping, barrel racing, 
bull riding and other rodeo 
events will be featured enter- 
tainment at Weber Arena this 
weekend (or K-State'i Col- 
lege Rodeo. 

Matt McKinstry, K-State 
rodeo coach, said 15 teams 
will compete at the annual K- 
State rodeo. 

He said the teams are from 
community colleges and uni- 
versities from the Central 
Plains region in Oklahoma 
and Kansas 

"We've made a few chang- 
es with how we're running 
things, but it's pretty much 
the same rodeo as the last 20 
years, except different con- 
testants," he said. 

McKinstry said the rodeo 
begins at 730 p.m. Friday, 
and will continue it 1 and 
7:30 p.m. Saturday and 1 



p.m. Sunday at Weber Arena. 

He said adult tickets $10 
in advance at specific loca- 
tions or $1 1 at the event, and 
children's tickets are $5 in 
advance or $6 at the event. 

The tickets can be pur- 
chased in advance at RB 
Outpost, Orscheln Farm and 
Home, the K- State Union 
Bookstore, Vamey's Book- 
store and Vanderbilts. 

Russell Gottlob, K-State 
rodeo team adviser, said the 
other rodeo events include 
team roping, breakaway rop- 
ing, steer wrestling, saddle 
bronc riding, bareback riding 
and goat-tying. ^^ . . — 

"Somethinglclnd of unique 
about K-State's rodeo is that 
it's the first collegiate rodeo 
for the spring semester," he 
said. 

Gottlob said K-State's 
team competed in several 
rodeos last semester, and the 
team hopes to qualify some 



of its members for the Col- 
lege National Finals Rodeo 
like it has in the past. 

One thing that is different 
for the rodeo this year is the 
variety of national anthem 
singers, he said. 

Gottlob said one of the 
singers is the mother of a for- 



mer team member who was 
killed in a rodeo accident 
The K-State Singers and a 
local country musician also 
will sing the anthem 

He said a dance will fol- 
low the rodeo Friday and 
Saturday evenings at R.C. 
McGraw's. 




Chrlttophar H*nmrlndwl| COlLtGIAN 

Broeko Inkw, Colby Communtty Collego ridar, nc« to tie a goat 
during the final round of last year's K-State rodeo. 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, Feb. 23, 2007 



Forensics student earns spot in national competition 



•y Krittwi Radtrick 

Julia Debes decided to use 
the military's Survivor Ben- 
efits Plan as the subject of a 
persuasive speech. 

Debes, senior in agricultur- 
al communications and jour- 
nalism, was a new military 
wife at the time and said she 
knew the plan was flawed. 

Little did sKe know her 
knowledge of those flaws 
would land her a spot in the 
oldest national forensics tour- 
nament in the country. 

"Being able to pull my con- 
cerns about my future and have 
it being recognized as one of 
the best speeches in Kansas, 
1 shake when 1 get done with 
it," Debes said. "Seeing it get 
rewarded is amazing" 

Debes is one of two stu- 



dents in Kansas who won the 
honor of attending the In- 
terstate Oratory Association 
National Tournament, April 
26-28 in Santa Fe, N.M )essy 
Ohl, junior in political sci- 
ence, who placed second at 
the tournament last year, also 
will attend 

Debes said she was hon- 
ored to join the number 'of 
students who have made it to 
the tournament. 

"1 am incredibly excited to 
qualify," she said. "The previ- 
ous people who have gone 
to K-State have been people 
that I really, really respect and 
thought were the best repre- 
sentation of K-Statc. To be 
included in those ranks makes 
me (eel proud of what I've ac- 
complished. It's the cherry on 
top of my career that I get to 
go my senior year." 



The beginning of the year 
wasn't so sweet, Debes said. 
There was skepticism regard- 
ing this year's team after thr«e 
seniors graduated 

"A lot of people were wor- 
ried that we wouldn't be a 
good team," she said. "We 
have surpassed expectations 
We have made up all of the 
ground we lost." 

The Speech Unlimited fo- 
rensics team finished first 
last weekend at the Kansas 
Association State Individual 
Events Tournament Feb. 17-18 
in Hutchinson. Kan 

K-Stste students won four 
individual events. Keen an Ra- 
mos, senior in theater, won 
prose interpretation, and Clare 
Peeley, sophomore in speech, 
won communication analysis. 
Debes also won persuasion 
and after-dinner speaking. 



The goal for this weekend's 
tournament in Manhattan is 
for team members to qualify 
for nationals, said Bobby Im- 
body, forensics coach. 

This is the time where 
people from different teams 
are trying to get qualified," he 
said "We're running every- 
thing we've got left of stuff 
that isnl qualified." 

Right now 44 members 
have qualified for the national 
tournament, said Craig Brown, 
director of Speech Unlimited. 

The students can use the 
next two tournaments to qual- 
ify 

"If things go well this week- 
end, we could reasonably 
qualify another seven or eight 
entries for nationals," Brown 
said. 

Students' support is one as- 
pect that possibly could help 



the team qualify this weekend, 
Imbody said. He said he en- 
courages students to support 
the team in the main audito- 
rium at Bluemont Hall this 
weekend. 

National tournaments are 
a tradition for Speech Unlim- 
ited, and K- State has finished 
no lower than 12th in the 
country since 1993, Imbody 
said 

"We're hoping to finish 
out and have a strong show- 
ing at nationals." Imbody said. 
"Hopefully we can move up 
from last year." 

Last year the team finished 
sixth at nationals. 

"Our program has always 
been pretty good," Brown 
said. "The thing that has re- 
alty made the difference is the 
support the college has given 
us through the years." 



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K-State opens recruiting offices abroad 



By Allison Voris 

,1 KANSAS SUTECOLIEGIAN 

Students in other coun- 
tries now will have better 
opportunities to see what K- 
State has to offer 

In the past five months, K- 
State opened recruiting offic- 
es in Beijing and Turkey, and 
there are plans for two other 
international offices. 

"We're interested in get- 
ting students from all over 
the world," said lim Lewis, 
director of international pre- 
admissions and recruiting. 
"The world is a big market, 
but you need to focus on spe- 
cific markets to begin with" 

The office in Beijing has 
shown success since its No- 
vember opening. Staff mem- 
bers of the office attend 
recruitment fairs in China, 
which saves K-State the trav- 



el costs of sending a repre- 
sentative from Kansas. The 
office staff also created a K- 
Statc Web site and made in- 
formational handouts printed 
in Chinese, Lewis said. 

"Now, students in China 
can go to a fair and get a local 
phone number they can call 
for information," Lewis said 
"I'm very pleased because 
1 think the office is doing a 
good job of getting informa- 
tion to potential students and 
their parents." 

The recruitment office in 
Turkey opened earlier this 
month and also is expected 
to be successful, Lewis said 

The opening of these of- 
fices is part of a two-year 
plan for K-State to expand 
its international enrollment. 
There also arc plans to open 
an office in New Delhi, In- 
dia, sometime this year, said 



Kenneth Holland, associate 
provost for international pro- 
grams. 

Much of K- State's effort to 
increase enrollment from for- 
eign countries was modeled 
after universities in Australia, 
which have used this type of 
program for almost 10 years, 
Holland said. 

"It's been very successful 
for them because the econo- 
mies of (hose regions of the 
world are growing very rap- 
idly, and more people can 
afford studying abroad," Hol- 
land said, 

In addition to booming 
economies, the placement of 
recruitment offices is based 
on the amount of students in 
each region. 

Areas like China have 
more students than seats in 
universities. Lewis said. 

Overcrowding is not a 



problem in the United States, 
which could be a reason in- 
ternational students are at- 
tracted to the idea of study- 
ing here, Holland said. 

"The population of the 
US. isn't growing that fast," 
he said "We have a lot of 
seats and spaces in our uni- 
versities. Also, higher educa- 
tion in the U.S. is considered 
the best in the world" 

International students not 
only bring financial benefits 
to K-State, but also bring op- 
portunities for students to 
learn about other cultures, 
said Beth Unger, vice provost 
for academic services and 
technology. 

"When it boils down to it, 
the international students we 
will recruit here will provide 
excellent opportunities for 
our current students," Unger 
said. 



Soldier gets 100 years in prison for rape, l(illing of Iraqi girl 



THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 



FORT CAMPBELL, Ky - A 
military judge sentenced a U.S. 
soldier to 100 years in prison 
Thursday for the gang rape and 
murder of an Iraqi girl and the 
killing of her family last year. 

The judge also gave Sgt Paul 
E. Cortez, 24, a dishonorable 
discharge. He will be eligible for 
parole in 10 years 

Cortez, of Barstow, Calif, 
pleaded guilty this week to four 
counts of felony murder, rape 
and conspiracy to rap>e in a 
case considered by many to be 
among the worst atrocities by 
U.S. military pereonnel in Iraq 

In his plea agreement, Cor- 
tez said he conspired with three 
other soldiers fivm the Port 
Campbell -based 101st Airborne 
Division to rape 14-year-old 
Abccr Qassim al-]anabi The 
men killed the girl, her parents 
and her younger sbter 



Early yesterday, tears rolled 
down Cortez's (ace as he apolo- 
gized for the mpe and murders. 
He said he could not explain 
why he took part. 

"I stilJ don't have an answer,'' 
Cortez told the judge. 1 don't 
know why, 1 wish 1 hadn't. The 
lives of four innocent people 
W'crc taken I want to apologize 
for all o( the pain and suffering 
1 have caused the al-Ianabi Fam- 
ily" 

The military judge hearing 
the case. Col Stephen R Hen- 
ley, issued a sentence of life 
in prison without parole, the 
maximum (or the charges. Un- 
der military law. the defendant 
must be given the lesser sen- 
tence unless he violates terms 
of the plea a^'ecraent, which 
requires Cortez to testily against 
others charged in the case 

Psychologist Charles Figley 
testified Cortez and others suf- 
fered stress brought on by fa- 
tigue and trauma. 



"It eats you up," Figley said. 
"It's a horrible thing. TTiis b not 
unique We've seen this in other 
wars." 

Five soldiers who served 
with Coriez in Iraq testified that 
his actions were out of character 
and described the hardships of 
war including sleep deprivation 
and the lack of running water 

' I just never would have seen 
it coming," said Stafi Sgl. Tim 
Briggs. who has known Coriez 
for five years and served with 
him in Iraq. 

I*rosecutors said the stress 
was no excuse for the actions 
of Coriez and the other soldien 
from the lOlsl Airborne Divi- 
sion. 

On Wednesday, Cortez de- 
scribed raping the girl in her 
family's home in Mahmoudiya 
last March, along with Spc. 
James Barker, 24 Barker plead- 
ed guilty in November to rape 
and murder and was sentenced 
to 90 years in military prison. 



Barker has said in a sworn 
statement the soldiers drajik 
whiskey and played cards while 
plotting the assauh. 

Cortez said this week former 
private Steven D Green raped 
the girl before he did Then 
Green shot her father, mother 
and sister before shooting the 
teen in the head, Cortez said. 

He also testified the soldiers 
tried to bum the girl's body 
They burned their own clothes 
and threw the murder weapon, 
an AK-47, into a canal in an ef 
fort to dispose of the evidence 

A jury found Cortez not 
guilty of more serious charges 
of premeditated murder and 
conspiracy to commit 

Pfcs. fesse Spielman, 22. 
and Bryan Howard, 19, await 
courts-martial. Green, who is 
accused of being the ringleader 
but was discharged from the 
military before being charged, 
will be prosecuted in a federal 
court in Kentucky. 





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Conservationist 
to speak at City Hall 



By WHIow Williamson 

MNMSSWKOLLEGIAN 

A biologist for the federal 
government will speak about 
working to preserve Kansas 
wildlife Monday evening. 

Michele McNulty, biologist 
with the US, Fish and Wildlife 
Service, wilt deliver a presen- 
tation, "Kansas Conservation 
Effort throu^ the Fish and 
Wildlife Service," at 7 p.m. 
Monday in City Hall It will 
follow the annual meeting of 
Friends of Sunset Zoo, which 
starts at 6 30 p.m 

This presentation is one of 
a series that Sunset Zoological 
ftrk gives every winter, said 
Rachel Soash. curator of edu- 
cation at the zoo 

Soash said the goal is to 
"inform people on what's go- 
ing on in their backyards," 

She said McNult/s pre- 
sentation will cover issues 
like the reintroduction of the 
black -footed ferret in western 



Kansas, and the monitoring 
program for bald eagles in this 
state, especially around Mil- 
ford Lake. She will also cover 
broader conservation issues 
such as energy development 
and its impact on wildlife, 
Soash said 

McNulty graduated from 
K-State in 1990 with a degree 
in parks and natural resource 
management and has worked 
for the US Army Corps of 
Engineers and the Natural Re- 
source Conservation Service. 

Soash said members of 
Friends of the Sunset Zoo try 
to bring in presenters that fo- 
cus both on local and national 
conservation issues. 

Students can join Friends of 
the Sunset Zoo by paying $30, 
Soash said. Members receive 
bee admission to the zoo, bee 
or discounted entry to more 
than 150 other accredited 
zoos across the nation and 
admission to "members only" 
events, she said. 




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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 9 



UFM to begin new courses on playing pol(er, ul(eleles 



»y Hannah BIkk 

KANSK STATE COLUMN 

Thi* spring, the UPM 
Community Learning Cen- 
ter will offer credit and non- 
credit courses from all areas 
of interest The center added 
several new spring courses 
this semester, said Marcia 
Homung, UFM education 
coordinator. 

Though many opt to take 
one of the more popular class- 
es, like community CPR and 
first aid or ballroom dancing, 
students also can choose from 
a few, slightly obscure up- 
coming sessions designed to 
improve lives and add some 
distinction to the daily rou- 
tine of college, Homung said. 

UFM classes can help peo- 
ple fill an extra credit hour for 
their transcripts or just spend 
a few hours bonding with a 
roommate. Course descrip- 
tions, as well as date, loca- 
tion and cost information, are 



available on the UFM Web 
site, uiww.k-state.edu fufm. 

"All K-state students 
should take a look at the Web 
site and find one that fits their 
interests," Homung said. 

The following list contains 
just a few of the classes the 
center offers this semester. 

CLUTTER CLEARING 

7 to 9 p.m. Mondays 
April 9 through April 23 
$35 

Description: In this class, 
students will examine the en- 
ergetics of clutter and discuss 
ideas that empower them to 
let go of their excess baggage. 
According to the site, 
"clutter holds us in the past, 
preventing us from living 
fully." A variety of organizing 
strategies and principles of 
feng shui will be utilized, and 
homework assignments will 
be important to the learning 
process. Students are advised 
to "come prepared to liberate 



(themselves)," and recognize 
that "clearing our environ- 
ment is a dynamic tool for 
change." 

POKER: TEXAS HOLD 'EM 
FOR BEGINNERS 

7 to 8:30 p.m Tuesdays 
April 24 
$17 

Description: For students 
tired of losing money to 
friends in late-night poker 
matches, UFM offers a little- 
known secret called "T^xas 
Hold Em for Beginners" 
Students enrolled in the class 
can critique their betting and 
playing strategies and 'table' 
manners Bring a friend, but 
leave the stogie, sunglasses 
and visor at home. After all, 
"luck will get you so far, but 
skill will get you farther," 

EMOTIONAL EATING 

6:30 to 8 p.m Wednesdays 
April 1 1 through April 25 
$39 



Description: For people who 
spent an hour trying to park 
on campus, failed an econ- 
omy test, went home to find 
the dog tearing up the sofa 
or any other stressful activity, 
UFM might have a solution. 

This course is designed 
for anyone who wishes to 
deal with their food issues 
without dieting According 
to the UFM Web site, "diets 
are about restricting and po- 
licing one's self, and further- 
ing mistrust of our ability to 
make nurturing choices." Stu- 
dents enrolled will be "exam- 
ining and reinterpreting their 
thoughts and attitudes about 
eating and eating behaviors " 

CAR BUYING 101 

6:30 to 7:30 p.m, Thursdays 
April 19 
$12 

Description: Many college 
students deal with the pres- 
sures of real- world car shop- 
ping, which can be time-con- 



suming and complicated. 

This seminar "takes par- 
ticipants step -by -step through 
every phase of a vehicle pur- 
chase, providing informa- 
tion on conducting research 
on vehicles, buying a new or 
used vehicle, trading in a ve 
hide versus selling i( private- 
ly, and full explanations uf 
how to save the most money 
in Rnancing your purchase ' 

UKELELE NIGHT 

6:30 to 8 p.m Wednesdays 
April 25 
$16 

Description: There will be 
opportunities not only to play 
a ukelele, but also to watch 
a professional demonstrate 
their abilities According to 
the UFM Web site, students 
will "learn strums and chords 
for Tin Pan Alley and Roar- 
ing '20s-style songs in (he key 
of C." 

Students who own his or 
her own ukelele are encour- 



aged to bring them, however, 
there also will be Hve loaner 
ukeleles available for use, 

DIGITAL SCRAP-BOOKING 
FOR THE 21ST CENTURY 

7 to 9 p.m. 

April 27 

S14 

Description: This one- night 

course will show students 

how to "organize, enhance, 

and store your digital photos 

from a digital camera. CD, or 

scanner onto a laptop." 

Prom there, entrants in the 
class will use their photos to 
create a hard-bound 20-or- 
mo re- page storybook. Ac- 
cording to the site, "the soft- 
ware is specially created for 
the album maker who loves 
to take pictures." 

Students are encouraged 
to bring their laptops to leam 
how to send and receive pic- 
tures via wireless Internet, 
but laptops are not required 
to take the class. 



Boys & Girls Club of Manhattan to raise funds 
with community casino night, auction 



By Ells* Podhajsky 

KANSAS UATEtOlUGtAN 

Members of a local youth 
organization are planning 
to raise money this weekend 
with a little harmless gam- 
bling. 

The Boys & Giris Club of 
Manhattan will be host to its 
eighth -annua I Casino Night 
and Auction from 7 to 11 
p m. Saturday in the Houston 
Street Ballroom, 427 Houston 
St. 

The event is a fundraiser 
that executive director loyce 
Gltsscock said provides a sig- 
nificant portion of operating 
funds to run the program. 

Glasscock said the night 
consists of casino-style games 
like blackjack, craps, roulette 
and slot machines. She said 
anyone 21 and older can at- 
tend, but there is an entry fee 
of $45. 



Glasscock said players will 
receive a voucher at the door, 
which they use as "money" for 
the games. 

Each time a player wins, 
he or she qualifies for an ad 
ditional chance at winning a 
prize from the drawing at the 
end of the night 

The prizes include a one- 
week slay at Cabo San Lucas. 
Mexico, a basketball signed 
by K-State men's basketball 
coach Bob Muggins, tickets 
to K-State sporis events and 
a full set of tools, Glasscock 
said. 

In addition to the drawing, 
she said there will be live and 
silent auctions, a Texas Hold 
'Em tournament, dancing and 
a disc jockey. 

"There's just so much go- 
ing on," Glasscock said "It's 
not a static event - there's 
something for everyone " 

The Casino Night and Auc- 



tion theme is Mardi Gras, and 
a K-State student designed 
most of the materials, Glass- 
cock said 

Deanna Bauman, senior in 
fine arts, said she won the op- 
portunity through her Matrix 
Business Practices class. 

Bauman said the instruc- 
tor, Tbm Book waiter, brings in 
four clients to his design class 
each semester, whom students 
compete to work with. The 
clients choose which student's 
designs (hey like best and 
have the individual students 
work on one of their projects. 

The Boys and Girls Club of 
Manhattan was one of the cli- 
ents for Bauman's class She 
said members of the organi- 
zation wanted a student to 
create the design for various 
materials for Casino Night 

"I designed a poster, flyer, 
program cover, invitation, 
RSVP, the save-the-date and 



First Annual International 
Potluck Dinner 



at Frith Community Center 

Saturday Bring your Favorite Dish! 

Drinks provided! 



February 24"' 
1-5 pm 



Hosted by: 

KSU lAESTEandMIE 



Open Invite to all 
Students & Families 




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Body Imailel 



Monday. February 26 
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the ticket to the event," Bau- 
man said. "(The Boys and 
Girls Club members) were re- 
ally easy to get along with and 
really, really nice." 

Program Development Di- 
rector Casey Kimmel said it 
was difficult to decide which 
design to use, but in the end 
the club's board of directors 
chose Bauman's Kimmel 
said every year Casino Night 
breaks its record for mon 
ey raised. The event netted 
$40,000 last year and she said 
she is hoping for $45,000 

'I think that people come 
because they enjoy the orga- 
nization and they believe in 
the mission," Kimmel said. 



Cleric at center of alleged CIA 
kidnapping case says he was 
tortured in Egyptian prison 



tHtASSOCIMlD PRESS 

ALEXANDRIA, Egjfpt - 
An Egyptian cleric, speaking 
publicly for the first time, 
said Thursday Egyptian of- 
ficials tortured him in pris- 
on after he was kidnapped 
in Italy - allegedly by CIA 
agents - and sent here for 
interrogation. 

The claims by Osama 
Hassan Mustafa Nasr sharp- 
ened the controversy over 
the CIA's "extraordinary 
rendition" program, just days 
after Italy indicted 26 Amer- 
icans and five Italian agents 



accused of seizing him. The 
case is the first criminal trial 
connected to the rendition 
policy, in which U.S. agents 
secretly transferred terror 
suspects for interrogation to 
third countries where critics 
say they faced torture. 

Italy has signaled it won't 
seek the extradition of the 
25 CIA agents and one U.S. 
Air Force lieutenant colo- 
nel. 

However, it will likely try 
them in absentia. Prom the 
outset, U.S. officials have 
declined comment on the 
case. 



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Page 10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, Feb. 23, 2007 



PEOPLE IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD 



Mnior in micro- 
biology, hai a 

full schedule with 
classes extracur- 
ricular activities. 



jMlyitl 

COiLEGMN 




Truman finalist stays busy with clubs 



ByMllwltvMy 

KMISA5 SWKO(.L{()UH 

For some students, one ex- 
tracurricular activity is all if 
takes to whet the appetite for 
experience and service. 

Howetmr, some students 
dedicate nearly every making 
hour to a plethora of organi- 
zations, dubs and societies. 
Jenna Kennedy is one of those 
students 

A native of Hoxie, Kan., 
Kennedy, senior in microbiol- 
ogy, graduated from Wheat- 
land High School and came 
to K-Slate on what she calls 
a relatively late decision. Yet. 
Kennedy said she has loved 
her time as a Wildcat and is 
^ad to be a part of the K-Stale 
community. 

Kennedy recently urns 
named KState's finalist for the 
Harry S. Tfuman scholarship, 
which provides funding for 
coliege juniors who are pursu- 
ing graduate degrees in public 
service. With her intellectual 
fortitude, a world of opportu- 
nity IS available at Kennedy's 
hands. 

Q: Why do you dioow to be 
to Involved? 



A: There's a lot of things on 
campus that mean a lot to nie. 
I love what 1 do, and that's why 
1 stay so busy. 

Like today, I'm going to 
work in my immunology lab in 
Chalmen, and I'm getting to do 
some really coot things in there 
for e project 1 am working on. 

After class, I'm going to the 
Flint Hilts .Community Clinic, 
which is a clinic downtown 
that provide care for people 
without medical or health in- 
surance 

After that, I help lead a 
Bible study at St Isidore's, h's 
kind of crazy, but I love it. 

Q: What organlzatioiu do you 
i«ve? 

A; Well, we just finished up the 
PROUD campaign, and I was 
really involved with that as co- 
chair of the advisory board. An- 
other thing I am involved with 
is my sorority I hang out there 
a lot and I love it. I've been on 
exec (executive board), and 
now I'm involved with recruit- 
ment. 

I'm involved with Chimes 
Junior Honorary, and I'm the 
president of thai organization, 
which is focused a lot on ser- 
vice. 



I'm involved with Rotaract, 
kind of a rotary for college stu- 
dents I think it's fun because 
we have cool guest speakers, 
and I feel like I can increase 
my global perspective, which 
is why I'm here It's the other 
part of my college education. 
There's the knowledge side 
and the side that I'm trying to 
build so that I can go into the 
field that I want to. 

Q: What field do you want to 

go into? 

A: I want to be a physician 
in tropical medicine, learning 
about other countries and cul- 
tures and ways of the world. 

Definitely based on service. 
I have a lot of options at this 
point because there's so many 
organizations that 1 could go 
through So it's really hard for 
me to say. This is the one 1 
want to work for,' but they're 
all doing great work, and a lot 
of them are specific to my in- 
terest in malaria 

Q: M^iat graduate school(s) 
are you inlerettod in attend- 
ing? 

A: I'm looking at two schools 
with programs in tropical 
medicine that have a public 



health component. One is 
Emory and the other is Hi- 
lane. 

As a part of studying, the 
two degrees 1 hope to have are 
a (master's in public health) 
and an M.D. to be a physi- 
cian. The programs where I 
can combine the degrees and 
cut some time off is what I'm 
looking at. 

Q: li there my particular 
place you'd like to visit? 

A: Not anything more specific 
than Africa. I think that I'm 
fascinated by all of the dif- 
ferent parasites and diseases 
that occur there just by virtue 
of the climate, geography and 
landscape 

Q: Is there one particu- 
lar memory at K-Stale that 
stidis out to you? 
A: Most recently, just seeing 
everyone in black at the big 
game last Monday It was re 
ally cool to see how students 
would unite around that 
cause. 

It was great since we 
had been so involved in the 
PROUD campaign, to see ev- 
eryone expressing their sup- 
port and coming out to sup- 
port the team. 



Web site showcases 
Manhattan bar scene 



By Erk Browrt 

KANSAS STATE COtlEGIAN 

For K-State students who 
want to keep up to date on 
Aggievitle activity, the Man- 
hattan nightlife or any other 
useful college-life tidbits, a 
new information outlet might 
be helpful. 

Tbday marks the introduc- 
tion of wtvw.theprebar.com 
to the K-State community. 

Mike Kelly, junior in elec- 
tronic journalism and mar- 
keting intern for the Web site, 
said theprebar.com serves as 
a one-stop source for all of 
the information about college 
bar scenes, including recipes, 
coupons, specials, photos, 
stories and everything in be- 
tween. 

"We want to use this Web 
site to promote everything 
that's going on in Aggieville 
and the other bars in Man- 
hattan," Kelly said "We plan 
for this to be a good combi- 
nation of information and 
entertainment." 

The Web site is a branch 
of OneCityMedia, which also 
produces The Collegiate mag- 
azine and gocollegiate.com. 

The Web site started about 
one year ago in Madison, 
Wise , and covered about 30 
cities. 

According to the site's 
CEO and director, Aaron 
Hutchins, theprebar.com 
quickly became popular, with 
nearly 120,000 hits in its first 
two months. 

"It was too big for us to 
handle," Hutchins said. "So 
we revamped the Web jite to 
what it is today, letting stu- 
dents from different colleges 
update their own Web pages 
about what's going on around 
their bar scene." 

With the updated system. 



Manhattan is one of 17 col- 
lege towns that were selected 
to have their own Web page 
at theprebar.com 

"The Aggieville district re- 
ally drew us to Manhattan," 
Hutchins said "We've heaid 
nothing but good things about 
Aggieville from people who 
have had the experience. And 
Aggieville has enough bars jn 
its area to where a source pf 
information would be neces- 
sary to keep students up to 
date on all the activity" 

Eric Davis, junior in psy- 
chology and marketing in- 
tern for theprebarcom, said 
he predicts the site will be a 
success in Manhattan. 

"There's no reason it 
shouldn't work," Davis said. 
"It's worked very well in Mad- 
ison and other places, and I 
think we definitely have the 
opportunity to provide the 
students with something they 
will enjoy and something that 
will also be useful." 

Hutchins also noted 
theprebarcom is focused 
mainly on college towns in 
the Midwest. 

Along with K-State, the 
Web site also includes uni- 
versities like the University 
of Kansas in Lawrence and 
the University of Missouri in 
Columbia, Mo. 

To celebrate the new Web 
site, l^nks Tavern will hpst 
a launch party Saturday eve- 
ning. 

Hutchins said the event 
will feature good times, drink 
specials and more informa- 
tion about the new college- 
life media outlet. 

"The main goal here is for 
everyone to come out, haven 
blast, and let Mike (Kelly) and 
Eric (Davis) get the word out 
about the Web site," Hutchins 
said. 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 11 



SPOUSE 1 Wife offere advice for soon-to-be military 



continued from page 1 

spouse and not a loldier any- 
more," the laid. "So there 
wasn't really that break-in 
fwriod of getting uted to the 

'^fhlUtary, since I was already 
in it." 

Johnston said it can be dif- 
ficult for spouses who are new 
to the military. She said the 
'Spouse should be prepared for 

"military language. 

'" "You realize that your 

"Spouse is speaking in what 
Jou determine to be code," 
Johnston said. "Very few sen- 
'tences are ever put together 
that don't include either acro- 
nyms or abbreviations." 
' A spouse's time away is 



what Johnaton said can be the 
most difRcult facet of a mili- 
tary relationship When asked 
the hardest part of being mar- 
ried to a soldier, tears filled 
Johnston's eyes. Her husband 
will be deploying to Iraq for 
his second tour of duty, 

"You'd think I'd be used to 
it by now," she said. "But you 
never are." 

Johiuton said the best parts 
of military life come from 
the people you meet and the 
friendships formed. 

"The military family that 
you make can sometimes hold 
a stronger bond than your own 
family," Johnston said "And a 
lot of that is due to what you 
go through." 



She said every wife should 
realize many families are in 
the same situation and should 
take advantage of knowing 
they support one another. 

Johnston offered advice to 
spouses preparing for the mili- 
tary lifestyle. She said people 
should be involved, not just 
with events in the military, but 
with other interests and hob- 
bies outside of the military, 
like a job or school 

"I've always worked the 
entire time we've been mar- 
ried," Johnston said "And that 
has just been a lifesaver, hav- 
ing something that takes you 
out of the house instead of sit- 
ting around saying to yourself, 
'I wish he were here.'" 



Democrats drafting plan 
to take authority from Bush 



SENATE I Resolution requires majority vote 



continued from page 1 

u drafted In the University 
Relations Committee's pro- 
poaal, said Steve Levin, man- 
ager of the K- State Student 
Union Bookstore, in a Colle- 
gian article Thursday 

Univeraity Relations Com- 
mittee members have worked 
since September 2006 In 
drafting their online text- 
book-listing proposal. 

"We know that what we've 
created can be modified and 
changed, but at the same 



time, we support what the 
committee is doing." said Me 
lissa Hildebrand, University 
Relations Committee chair 
and senior in agricultural 
communications and journal- 
ism "We support the issue, 
and we want to keep pressure 
on where pressure needs to 
be" 

lb reach the Senate level 
again, a majority of Uni- 
versity Relations Commit- 
tee members must vote the 
resolution out of committee. 
Their vote could include a 



recommendation to reject or 
approve the resolution or no 
recommendation 

tf the resolution pastes the 
Senate level. Senate members 
will speak with upper admin 
istration and Faculty Senate 
members to modify the pro- 
posal as needed, Hildebrand 
said in a Collegian article 
Thursday 

If the resolution does not 
pass. Hildebrand said she 
is confident it will remain a 
prominent issue among stu- 
dents 



SHOW I Production poses challenges, 1 of crew says 



..i TME«500ATtDmSS 

WASHINGTON - Four 
'years ago, Congress passed leg- 
■tslation authorizing President 
"Bush to go to war m Iraq. Now 
Senate Democrats want to take 
it back. 

■■ Key lawmakers, backed by 
-party leaders, are drafting legis- 
"latiun that would effectively re- 
voke the broad authority grant- 
ed to the president in the days 
Saddam Hussein was in power, 
And leave US. troops with a 
limited mission as they prepare 
to withdraw 
"'■ Otficiab said Thursday the 
'precise wording of the measure 
Tfemains unsettled One version 
'ttould restrict American troops 
in Iraq to fighting al-Qaida, 
(raining Iraqi army and police 
forces, maintainmg Iraq's ter- 
-ritorial integrity and otherwise 
"proceeding with the withdrawal 
' '6f combat forces. 

Majority Leader Harry Reid, 
DNev, intends to present the 
proposal to fellow Democrats 
%ixt week, and heKs expected to 
3ry to add the measure to anti- 
terrorism legblation scheduled 
^ be debated later this month. 
3Jfficials who described the 
Strategy spoke only on condi- 
3on of anonymity, noting that 
3ank-and-Hle senators had not 
^t been briefed on the details. 
— Republicans recently thwart- 



ed two Democratic attempts 
to pass a nonbinding measure 
through the Senate that was 
critical of Bush's decision to de- 
ploy an additional 21,500 com 
bat troops. 

After failing on his second 
attempt last Saturday, Reid said 
he would turn his attention to 
passing binding legislation. 

Jim Manley. a spokesman 
for Reid, declined to discuss the 
deliberations, saying only, "No 
final decisions have been made 
on how to proceed." 

Any attempt to limit Bush's 
powers as coiiunander in chief 
would likely face strong oppo- 
sition from Republican allies of 
the administration in the Sen- 
ate. Additionally, unlike earlier. 
nonbinding measures, the legis- 
lation now under consideration 
could also face a veto threal. 

Still, it marks a quickening 
of the challenge Democrats are 
mounting to Bush's war policies 
following midterm elections in 
which war-weaiy voters swept 
Republicans from power in both 
the House and Senate. 

The emerging Senate plan 
differs markedly from an ap- 
proach favored by critics of 
the war in the House, where a 
nonbinding measure passed last 
week. 

House Speaker Nancy Pelo- 
si has said she expects the next 
challenge to Bush's war policies 



to come in the form of te^la' 
tion requirmg the Pentagon to 
adhere to strict training and 
readiness standards in the case 
of troops ticketed for the war 
zone. 

Rep. John Murtha, D-Pa., 
the leading advocate of that ap- 
proach, has said it would effec- 
tively deny Bush the ability to 
proceed with the troop buildup 
that has been partially imple- 
mented since he announced it 
m January 

Some Senate Democrats 
have been privately critical of 
that approach, saying it would 
have virtually no chance of 
passing and could easily back- 
fire politically m the face of 
Republican arguments that it 
would deny reinforcements to 
troops already in the war zone. 

Several Senate Democrats 
have called in recent days for 
revoking the original authoriza- 
tion that Bush sought and won 
from Congress in the months 
before the US. led mvasion that 
toppled Saddam Hussein. 

That measure authorized 
the president to use the armed 
forces "as he determines to be 
necessary and appropriate ... 
to defend the national security 
of the United States against the 
continuing threat posed by Iraq" 
and to enforce relevant United 
Nations Securi^ Council reso- 
lutions. 



continued from page 1 

will be featuring the English 
department." 

The production crew is 
composed of eight students 
and 12 employees of the Edu- 
cational Communications 
Center. 

Brandon Cummins, se- 



nior in electronic journalism. 
works on the set performing a 
variety of jobs Cummins said 
technical aspects like running 
the video switcher were the 
biggest challenges 

"I ran camera for our first 
training session, and last week 
I recorded and ran tapes," 
Cummins said. "So far, every 



thing is so new for me that it's 
challenging It really interests 
me because this is what I plan 
on going into" 

"Show K-State" is shown 
on KST8 and Cox Cable 
Channel 8 The show is avail 
able to Cox Cable subscribers 
in the Manhattan, Ogden and 
Junction City areas 



Obama, Clinton rivally flares up 
over campaign contributor 



THE ASSOICATED PRESS 

WASHINGTON - The ri- 
val presidential campaigns 
of Hillary Rodham Clinton 
and Barack Obama traded 
accusations of nasty politics 
Wednesday over Hollywood 
donor David Geffen, who 
once backed Bill Clinton 
but now supports his wife's 
top rival. 

The Clinton campaign 
demanded that Obama de 
n ounce comments made by 
the DreamWorks movie stu- 
dio founder, who told New 
York Times columnist Mau- 
reen Dowd in Wednesdays 
editions that while "every- 
body in politics lies," the 
former president and his 
wife "do it with such ease, 
it's troubling." 

The Clinton camp also 
called on Obama to give 
back Geffen s $2,300 contri- 
bution. 

Campaigning in Iowa, 
Obama refused. 

"It's not clear to me why 



I'd be apologizing for some- 
one else's remark," the Illi- 
nois senator said 

For her part. New York 
Sen. Clinton sidestepped 
questions, leaving the issue 
to her aides to discuss 

"I'm just going to stay (o 
cused on my campaign and 
I'm going (o run a positive 
campaign about the issues 
that affect the people in our 
country," she told The Asso- 
ciated Press in an interview 
in Nevada She was purlici 
pating a candidate forum in 
Carson City 

The Clinton team seemed 
eager to continue the attack. 
With Obama in Iowa, aides 
arranged for former Iowa 
attorney general Bonnie 
Campbell to criticize him 
in a conference call with re 
porters. 

In the newspaper inter- 
view, Geffen also said Bill 
Clinton is "a reckless guy" 
and he does tiut think Hill- 
ary Clinton can bring tht 
country together during a 



time of war, no matter how 
smart or ambitious she is 
Obama spokesman Rob 

ert Gibbs added another 
criticism of Clinton 

"H is also ironic that 
Senator Clinton lavished 
praise on Monday Bnd is 
fully willing to accept today 
the support of South Cam 
lina Mate Sen. Robert Ford, 
who said if Barack Obuina 
were to win the nomination. 
he would drag down the rest 
ot the Democrat it Party be 
cause he's black,'" Gibbs' 
statement said. 

Ford later apologized 
The Clinton campaign said 
it disagreed with Ford, but 
the senator has embraced 
his support. 

Another Democratic 
presidential candidate. New 
Mexico Gov. Bill Richard 
sun. said at the candidate fu 
rum that Obama should dt- 
nounce Geffen's comments 
"We Democrats should all 
sign a pledge that we all be 
positive." Richardson said. 



I United States to relax rules for children travelling overseas; critis say rules discourage tourism 



mi tHE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

3 WASHINGTON - US 
^jhildren will not need pass- 
ports to come into the country 
^y land or sea, the Homeland 
Security Department an- 
Suunced Thursday 
Z The decision was praised 
3y tourism groups and Cana- 
dian government officials who 
Jad fought the requirement. 
2 Under new passport rules 
JjnaX could take effect as early 
3k January 2008, all adulb - 
3icluding U.S. citizens - will 
3e required to show passports 
3u cross the nation's borders. 



But the government reversed a 
decision requiring children to 
have passports as well 

Forcing families to buy 
passports for their children, at 
a cost of $82 each, was "one of 
the items most onerous" about 
the new passport rules, said 
Luke Rich of the Buffalo Ni- 
agara Partnership, a regional 
chamber of commerce group. 
"This is an important step It's 
good to see the administra- 
tion's listening" 

Homeland Security Secre- 
tary Michael Chertoff said the 
change was "specifically de- 
signed to make it cheaper for 



families." 

The decision means that 
children age 15 or younger 
who are US or Canadian citi- 
zens and have parental con- 
sent will be able to enter the 
USA with just a birth certifi- 
cate. 

Children ages 16 to IS also 
will be allowed to cross with 
birth certificates if they are 
part of an adult -supervised 
school, religious, cultural or 
athletic group, according to 
Homeland Security 

Sen Patrick Leahy, D-Vt,, 
praised the department for 
changing the rule and "recog- 



nizing the low security risk of 
travel by children " 

There will be no change to 
the new rules for those who 
fly. Everyone coming into the 
USA by plane, no matter the 
age, must show a passport un- 
der a portion of the passport 
rules that took effect Jan 23 

The passport rules affecting 
those entering the USA from 
Canada, Mexico. Bermuda, 
the Caribbean, and Ci'ntral 
and South America have been 
controversial since they were 
announced in 2005 as part of 
a po8t-9/ll effort to tighten 
security along the nation's 



borders. 

Critics said the rules would 
be too costly for families, 
would discourage cross-bor- 
der travel and tourism and 
would damage the economy 
in border communities 

That criticism softened 
Thursday "We are very 
pleased" with the exemp 
tion for children, said Mftisit' 
Leclerc, spokcswcTiTian (or 
Canadian Public Safety Minis 
ter Stockwell Day. "We want 
to ensure there will still be 
a smooth fiow of legitimate 
trade and travel on the but 
der" 



The Homeland Security and 
State department are working 
on other modirications to the 
rules, including developing a 
high-tech border -crossing 
card that would be less cxpcn 
sive and easier to obtain than 
a passpttn. The new ID would 
be called. 8 PaaspOrt Card 

Agents must now examine 
hundreds of variations of driv 
er's licenses and Hrth certifi 
cates, which are often easy \i> 
fake and don't prove nattotial 
ity 

About 12 tnilliun Amen 
canit were issued passports in 
the last fiscal year. 



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Page 12 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, Feb. 23, 2007 



Evolution flip-flops make Kansans 'look like bunch of idiots' 



THUSSOCIATiDPREU 

TOPEKA, Kan - Lisa Vol- 
lujid aiid her biulugy classroom 
at Topcka West High School 
are in the (.enter of a political 
debate that's left Kansas with 
five iiet5 of science standards 
fur its public sehools in eight 
years 

Each time, changes in the 
tjuidelines have focused on 
evolution and resulted from 
,1 shift in power among politi- 
cal factions on the Stale Board 
I if Education. They've made 
Kansas the target of late-night 
jokes and intends I ional scorn 
by adopting standards skepti- 
cal of evolution, but earlier this 
month, a new board major- 



ity switched back to evolution- 
friendly sidelines. 

But educatora and parents 
tielieve how Volland and her 
fellow teachen respond is what 
counts, regardless of what the 
standards say The board's 
back-and-forth has raised ques- 
tions about whether the "policy 
chum" will result in burnout or 
self-censorship by teachers. 

Volland hasn't changed les- 
sons conveying evolution is 
well-supported by evidence and 
central to understanding her 
subject. But she acknowledged 
being sensitive to what people 
think outside her classroom. 

"I am not trying to make sci- 
ence the vUlain," said Volland, 
who supports the latest stan- 



dards. "1 know that you have 
to handle some things with kid 
gloves," 

And one thing is sure: The 
ongoing conflict has undercut 
the board's credibility among 
teachers, parents and even stu- 
dents like Courtney Mitchell, a 
17-year-old junior in Volland's 
advanced-placement biology 
class. 

" It's like a really bad teenage 
relationship," she said "TVo 
people get together, they break 
up, they get back together 
again" 

Science guidelines came up 
for review in 1999 and 2005. 
when conservative Republi- 
cans controlled the board. But 
moderate Republicans won key 



elections in 2000 and 2006, 
giving a majori^ to a coalition 
of Democrats and moderate 
Elepublicans. 

The result: evolution-friend- 
ly standards through 1998; 
standards deleting most refer- 
ences to the theory in 1999, 
evolution- &iendly ones again in 
2001; standards incorporating 
criticisms of evolution cribbed 
from "intelligent design" advo- 
cates in November 2005; and 
the latest, evolution -friendly 
guidelines. 

And. the board must review 
the latest standards again by 
20M. 

"This back-and-forth game 
they're playing with the kids 
in Kansas makes us look like 



bunch of idiots," said Mike 
Ford, who teach» astronomy 
and physical sciences at Holton 
High School, about 30 miles 
north of Topcka. 'Just leave it 
alone." 

Elecisions about what's 
taught are left to local boards of 
cduestion, and the state stan- 
dards are used to develop tests 
that measure how well students 
learn science. 

I>arties on both sides of the 
debate contend the standards 
could have influence as teach- 
ers try to ensure that students 
test well 

And the board's last anti- 
evolution turn led some stu- 
dents to worry that their ap- 
plications to elite universities 



would get extra scrutiny, if not ; 
rejected. It didn't help that,; 
only months before, the Uni-'! 
versity of California, Berkeley ^ 
made headlines for rcfiising to ' 
approve courses at a Christian 1 
school because its textbook • 
challenged evolution. • 

But as Brenda Welbum, ex- , 
ecutive director of the National ' 
Association of State Boards of 
Education noted, "Everyone ' 
says that when a teacher is in a 
classroom, when they close the 
door, what happens, happens." 

So far, there's no indication 
that over the past eight years, 
teachers have altered what 
theyVe done in the classroom. 

"I haven't changed anythit^ 
that I've taught," Pord said. 



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abiB Juna t 306-882-6803 

ONE TO two-badroom 
aparimanV lublaaaa tvalt- 
able aa aoon m r~wlMi 

One block Irwn AgglavM, 
iwa btocKa fmn cwnpua 
S4S0y montfi Contact 
785-341.7018. 



ONE, TWO, tour, t w bttf 



loi Juna and Augutt 
leaaei 785-564-0857. 

ONE. TWO three, and 
lour bedroom apartmants 
ClOM lo campus and ag- 
gMvMa Paflimg and laun- 
dry 785-530-5800. 

l>kl TWfi, ihraa, (our, 
trve. six b«dnMm apart- 
fitant/ houaas naxt to cam- 
pus Washer' dryer, cen- 
tral Bir Na Pels 
785-537-7060. 

ONE-BEDflGOM APAHT- 
MENTS In quM BKfilax 
al 1811 Plan. AvallabI* 
June 1st (inlurnislied. 
canifal *lf. parWng, watar 
and trash paid. No patt. 
S375 per rnonlti Cal ICSU 
Foundation al 

785-532-7668 or 

785-532-7641 

PARK PLACE Apan- 
n%anti One- Sadroomi 
Sumrrwr/ tail laaung Psta 
«e)com« Ore- halt mHa 
from KSU Bi $a<h ChM 
and ClaMn 7B6-530-2«&1 . 

»AAU m6l Apart- 
meois. Two- badiooms 
Pata walooma Summary 
Fall latalng On»- had 
mita tram KSU at Sath 
Child and Clatlln 
785-839-2951 

TkflEE AND tour-baiJ 
room apartmenti avall- 
aM in August Cloaa 10 
campus Walaf and trash 
paid. Coin opatatad laun- 
dry 785-537-7810, 
7B5-537-2255 

THREE-BEDROOM NICE 
houasa avallabia wsat at 
campus. No smoking. 
pala or partns Juna ot 
Auguat leases. $8SS. 
76S-778-63I8 Re^xjnsl- 
Ma (aranta onl|f 

TWO AND *»M4>adi 
•partmanta. June of 
gust leaaa No pi 
765-341-5070. 



TWO. THREE and tout 
badiUUiiw. close to cam- 
pua, central sir. dish- 
wastwr. laundry ItcHiuas 
No pels. avatablB Febru 
ary 1. 785539-0868 

TWO-eE0fl6oM aparl- 
msnt. Newly rsrvovatad 
AvBllBbla Juna 1 $600. 
two bloc*is to campus and 
Agglevllle Oishwasher. 
central air. laundry tacillty 
♦43-867-7527 

MENTS at 901 Moro, Tha 
Paragon, exceptional, all 
arrtanlUes. $810 June 1 
occupancy or aoonar. 
7S5-539-4283. 
785-539-8401 

TWfl-Bi6fiMW S«- 
CIAL at Park Place Apart- 
ments S495 rant plua tree 
cable through July 07 
785-539-2951 

TWO BEDROOM, 
CLOSE to cartas Psr- 
sonal wastter' dryer $645- 
J675/ rrortti 

785-341-44% 



TWA-ftl&M6M many 
sliea and pnces, June or 
Auguat. 765-341 -0686 

TWO-BEOfiOOMS. ALL 
bUspaid 765-341 ~M96 

VERY NICE ttira«-tM^ 
room, two bath apatlitwrYl 
Three t>k>cl(a to Aggieville. 
822 Fremont Attordstola 
ulllltles. August 1, 
786-313-1807 

WHY REPrr WHEN VCHI 
CAN BUY? Condos lor 
sale Two and three-bed- 
room starUng at $112,650 
collegiaievillacom 
785-537 2096 

WILDCAT VILLAQE Aval- 
able June or August four- 
bedriKim. two bath, 
washer/ dryer, aloim 
room, $1400 C«t>le pakj. 
786-776-2425 or 

78e-»6-37e0 wwwvll 
laga-rentals com. 



Pre- lease 

Today for 

Spring! 

Only A few 
homes remain 

Amenrtiei: 
■Wdiher/Dryefi or 

hookups available 
•On Site Management 
•Gsragei Available 
•Private Fit new Center 
•Storm Center 
•Peaceful Garden 

Setting 
•Enormous Clotctt 

BEOItCETOWN 

«to^i. I ihsr^twh M t 1 a 4 1^ lib 4 

776-8080 

iMim.i^tei9it9M!AeiiJm 



few Spaces Rami in lor 

• Graduats Studsnii 

• UppBt Cliiiinen 



• GiM iMMi ■ Im Smuhii ftaii 

• hMIMUiSNaC 

• Qslia laatl • bnadis Ckatii 

• Nsafimiteto 

• SkmtiiM 



• nmTm smat If «s IMgW 

MilsiiiliCIl IM<k»«(l1-- 
CiMiuw Sna ■ iisva i 
•OSHiMnpiMOKll* 

• i\/ KTMiMaan taimii 

• l<iuliii<rgBtftSi# 

WESTCHESTER MRK 
776-1118 




Spacious 
Duplexes 

Custom buill Aitti the 
K. Slate student 

in mind 

Eich duiiltK liittirn wslk-m 
cloiBti, illltrtc^gr^ 
■pplisnctt. Aiihsr/drvtr.oft 
niBBi ptrtino. phons and 
ctbis connactioni m SHry 
roam, igcurity lighting, trilh 
and iBwn cart 

Sacutity dapoiit ii tha lama 
BI om monih'i rtnt Tha 
IsaiB pBflod (>BgRa Aufuit 1 
Iwoiiayaar 



4 8B4r(ioins, 2 Bslhi 
I.eOOSq ft. 
} levels Study Bl1ii:e 
DNLYS1,15Q/ma 



(Bodroami, ISathi 
1.30) Sq Ft 
ONlTtl.tM'ino 

Sorry, No P»ttl 

OulM Neighborhood, 

Convenient and Close 

to Campus. 

Day: 313-97I1 

N)«lrt: 937-«Ma 



1420 

Btechwood Terrace 

New Apar(rnent 
Lg. 2 & 3 Bedroomi 
l"8attis 
Waiher/Dryer 
Energy Efficient 

On a Wsoilcil 

Sectulted 2 Acre Lot 

with Creek 



S740 & $885 

341-40^4 



DUPLEX AVAILABLE tor 
twetv« month lease Spa- 
cious two-bedroom, two 
batti. Appliances indude 
washw^ dryar. CioBa to 
campua T|B-4Bfr<835 





Inn !Tnl1*«JMi).<«df.( 

.... . : J 

'3000 Citttmf Mt«> 
1114 FrwiMMrt* 
• il9 Osaga* 



fOUn-Bef^nboM du- 
plex, 500 Laramie S286 
per room Wastter/ Dryer, 
765-410-2916 or 

768-447-0652 

F0LIR.8EDH0OM three 
baths (August) 51280, 
nice. Wastter/ Dryer 
liookupa. offGtrael park- 
ing, great locBllon, no 
pets/ amoking 

785-532-8256 

bath duplex lor rent plus 
Study room One-hall 
blOCK from KSU. Every- 
thing new. i3ompl«tely re- 
modeled Including new 
hardwood ttoori. new 
floor coverlnga. new 
lillctven cabineta and appll- 
ancss (even washer and 
dryer). Trash and lawn 
care included No pats 
11400/ momh June poa- 
session Call fleglna al 
Emerald Property Man- 
agement 785-587-9O00 

THF1EE. BEDROOM 
UNIT, located at 8/ 802 
North 5th No psts, 1975/ 
month, availatila June I 
785-564-0372, 

WALK TO class One, 
two, three. lour-t)edroom 
No smoking, no drinking, 
no pels 785-539-1554, 



LET'S HELP OUR 

LOCAL CHARITIES. 

Please consider a 

contribution to support 

our local charities. 



THINK GLOBALLY. 
ACT LOCALLY. 



* 



1110 N, lllli. TwQ-t>ed- 
room. June lease. No , 
pets, elOM to campus. 
785-639-1975 Or 

765-313-8292 

602 FHCMONT, three-bed^ 
room, one bath, no pals. . 
Available June 1 • 
785-539-1975 or • 
765-313-8292 . 

ATTRACTIVE 
THREE-BEDHOOM 
homes Available • 
Juna 1 Locations: 
2078 Colkiga View, 2505 
WInne, 1841 Plaits $950/ 
month No pets. Contact , 
Ryan Rentala, 
786.776-7706,, 
785-313-0455 ' 

FIVE BEDHOOM, CLOSE 
to campus. No Pets. Juna ' 
lease. 785-341-5070 ~ 

FIVE-BEDROOM, THREE 
blocks south of campus 
Nk» condition, no pats. , 
785-313-7473 

FIVE BEDROOM. TWO 
tJalh house lor rent 931 ' 
Vattlsr. June iaase 
Washer/ dryer, window atr- 
conMuoning. Fenced back- 
yard, pels allowed Olf- 
alraet parking SI 500/ 
month 765-539-4949 

FIVE BEDROOM June, 
July, August Alliance 
Proparty Management 
785539-4357 www.renl- 
spm.com 

FOR RENT Newer four- 
bedroom dupleii Good \<y 
tatmrt with dishwasher, 
washer and dryer No 
pels 11160. 

785-537-7597 

FOUfI LARGE bedroom, 
two bath, quiet locstlon 
naer KSU. Washer/ diyer. 
A/C fto smoking/ pets. 
June 785-53»-6553 



Classifieds continue 
from the previous page 



CLASSIFIEDS 



Friday, Feb. 23, 2007 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



To place an advertisement call 



Page 13 



II 1 1 _L II II II ,, ^ 

1' I ' L' ! ; L' ' J • ! 'i J " ' 

LET'S RENT 





10K APARTWENTS spa- 
cious two-bedroom tpart- 
m»nl in modem complex 
two blocHa «As{ at cam- 
pus at 1010 KMriMv. 
Quie! street, quality stu- 
dent iiviriQ Luge L- 
shaped kitttien, dl^- 
HBstW. air condlnoriing, 
sound proolsd, wall insu- 
lated, low utJMies, laundry 
room, no pets. June i- 
M«y leasa, S580. Call 
765-539-2536 

1203 Thurston, oiv 

Wocli to campus Hwtt con- 
stfueUon. One and two- 
t>edroont apartrnents. 

washer/ dryef. disti 
washer. tiaicDny. private 
parKIng, security itghttng. 
No pets iunt 2007 lease 
785-539-5508 or 

785-564.0857 

tttt FAIRVIEW. Ouiel 
one-dedroom (S400) and 
Studio ($375) near KSU 
Lauridrv Water, trash 
paid No pets, no srrvofc- 
ing 1 JUNE. 
530-342-1121 

1832 CUFLIN Across 
from Marian Hall 1Wo- 
(Mdroom apanments 
Clean, quiet, private park- 
ing No stTTOlOrg. no pots 
tSM. Auguat !•■•••. 
785-539-5508 or 

785-564-0857 

350 N teth. Two blocks 
\o K- State and Aggieville 
two- bedroom apertmentB 
Clean, quiet, private park- 
iriQ N>0 smoking, ru) pets. 
tSM June and Auguet 
leases 785-53»-5S0e Or 
785-604-0857 

JUNE LEASE two- bed- 
roofn apartment. Walk to 
campus. Excelteni cortdf- 
tion/ location htlpiAiKWw.- 
t tlLt K s t « t a ■ t^a jn 

res-iio-aeu 

PRELEASING JUNE and 
Augucl. Some units brand 
new. cloae to KSU. 
wester/ dryer Included 
CtM hir details 

785-778-2102 youngwilk 
sOyahoocom, wwwwilk- 
sapiscom 



TVfO AND ttiree-bad- 
room. Ck>&e to campus. 
Central air. dishwasher, 
coin operated laundry fa- 
cility Available June or 
Au^st No pets, 

785-537-1746 of 

785-539- 1545 



TWO-BEDROOM, large 
rooms, very dean, great 
l«:alk>n tl3S Elalrt*. 

June lease, no pels 
785-77tKK)62 




1111 WHAflTON Manor 
Road, lour-tiedroom lower 
level duplea with neutral 
cekirs, two baths, washer' 
dryer lumiahed SIT VM- 
ttat, three-bedroom lower 
level duplex wilh new car- 
pet, neutral colors and 
waaher/ dryer t>ook-upa. 
Very teaaonable rent witti 
great space in both du- 
plies. June lease No 
pots. Call 785-3 13-48 12 

NICE DUPLEX 6« Vat- 

Oer Four-bedroom, two 
t>alh includes all appll- 
ences, washer/ dryer. No 
pets. Available August t . 
StOeO/ month, 

785-293-5197 




1001 KEARNEY Four 
Bedroom, also have 
Three, Five, Six and 
Seven-8edrx>om houses 
All JUNE 1 rentals Pets 
OK 785-31 7-T71 3 

1S«6 PLATT. Four-betf- 

fOom. Cerrtral heat and 
air i^asher.' dryer, 

garage. June 1st lease. 
No pets Also have thfee- 
bedroom (vailalll*. 

T8S-$eS-1T4«. 



300 N. Illh On C^tty Park 
Tyro large, sunny three- 
bedroom ($750) Lauftdry. 
Water, trash paid. No 
pels, no smoWr>g, t JUNE 
and 1 AUGUST 

530-342-1121, 

AUGUST LEASE, 1305 

Pierre 4M Laramie. Wary 
nice lour-bedroom. two 
bath Washef/ dryer, een- 
Iral alt ccinditlonlr>9. LAfflt 
badnMmi. 785-3133976. 
785-313-5573 

AVAILABLE JUNE T 

Three to tour bedroom 
tfouse 1M1 HHIenM f4o 
srTH)king. rni pets $1035. 
785-4583021 

AVAILABLE JUNE 1«t. 
T h i — b e df oom, one bkicli 
west ot campus. Washer, 
dryer, and dishwasher in- 
cluded $870 per month 
Jim, 785-565-1748. 

AVAILABLE JUNE, tour- 
t3edrcK}m, two bath 
houses. Washer/ dryer, 
diahwastier, central air 
oonditMnlng. S24 Fre- 
mont. 1022 HumboWt Jefl 
TS5-313-39TS, Doug 
7a$-313-«T3 

BEAUTIFUL REMOD- 
ELEDhomee 1612. 16U 
PiftrTe, lour- Itve-bedroom, 
hM> bath, trash carpeli 
paint New kitchen, t>alh, 
modem appliances Ck>se 
to canipus. Move In June: 
August 785-304-0987 

eniTTNAV niOGE town 
hoiise Four.' tive-bedroom, 
two and one. halt baths, in- 
cludes applierKes, 
washer/ dryer No pels 
Availeble August 1 
765293-5197 

FIVE-BEDROOM 

HOUSE Walk to campus 
Two kitchens, flraptacea. 
central air. neutral colors, 
washer/ dryei furnished, 
garage, lawn mainte- 
nance, June lease No 
pets Can 7M-313-4S12 




FIVE-BEDROOM, two 

bath, washer/ dryer, dlah- 
wreeher, central air, very 
specious 1017 Claflln. No 
pets June lease 

785-770«)8S 



FOUR-6EDflOOM. TWO 
bath, cloae to eampu* 
Two IMng rooms. 
Washer/ dryer, central ait. 
No pals June end August 
leases 785-33«-n24. 

NEW LISTING, available 
June 1 Four 1o flve-bed- 
room hiouse k>Ca1ed east 
of Agoiaville at 824 
Lartml* Two bath, 
washer/ dryer, dish- 
washer. Gehtral B«r, Lease 
deposit pkis utMliUes 
785- 53B 3672, 

NEXT TO eempua, one 
tttrough sue -bedroom 

houses, end apanmenti. 
Washer/ dryer, central air. 
Available now or fai No 
pals ra5-S37-7060. 

ONE BEDROOMS TO 

choos£ Irom. Available 
June M Augual lat $325. 
$330, $360. $370, and 
S390 785-712-7257 

TNREE-BEORDCm MAIN 
ftoor. h»o-bedroom biase- 
menl apartment. Washer/ 
dryer In both Saftarale 
iMtai, availaUe August 
1 1211 Thurston, 

785-868-3471 cal after 

7p.»Tl 

THREE-BEDROOM, 

TWO bath duplei. two cat 
garage, washer/ dryer, 
very well mainlsined 
Available June 1, $»3U 
month. 821 MIsston 
785-776-9260 

TWO AND threebed- 
rooms, TWO blocke to cwn- 
pua, June and August 
leaaas, Ho pels, laundry 
hook-upa, central air 
$295/ bedroom 

785-336-1124, 

TWO-BEDROOM. 

CLOSE to campus Large 
bedrooms, available June 
nrtt SS90 7B5-712-72S7. 

VERYNICEtlve-bmlroam, 
two bath Available Jun* 
drat. S1500 

78S-712-72S7, 




FOUR TO fivB-bedfOoms. 
two bath, washer/ dryer, 
central air, dishwaaher 
Close to campus 
785-532-9564 

FOUR-BE OR OOM AND 
sii-bedmom houses 

Close to campus and Ag- 
giavHle Parking and laun- 
dry 785- 539-6800 

FOUR-BE DROOI^ 
HOUSE Close to cam- 
pus Large backyard. Cen- 
ttaf air' heat No stT>oking 
or pats Wired lor hot tub 
August lease SHOO' 
fhonlh 1520 Msrttord 
Road. 785-759 3520 

FOUR-BEDR(X)M, ONE 
bath house lor rent 900 
Valtier, June lease 
Washer/ dryer, central slr- 
condittoning. Fenced back- 
yard, pels allowed $T200/ 
rrtomh Party shaok and 
garage included 
786-539-4949 

F0UB8EDR00M, TWO 
and one- hat I bath, study 
August 1 S975 per 
rmnth, Kntghl Real Es- 
laie Call 785-539-5394 

(- n u R - B E D R O fvt 
JUNE, July, Augusi Al- 
liance Property Manage- 
rrteni, 765539 4357 www - 
leri I - ap iTi com 

4rW f^iuhBfeD- 

ROOM houses wHh cen- 
tral sir arul washer/ dryer 
fumislted. June leases 
No pets Call today tor 
your showing 
785-313-4812 

iihiAf pAur-bed- 

ROOM houea, June 1 
lease, tour bloc lis Irom 
union Fireplace, private 
palki. Nonsmoking, olf- 
sireet parking $1300 
785-776-2155 

HOUSE FOR rent, iwo 
bkicks from Aggieville, 
ckise to campus, Frva- 
twdroom, three bath, 
washer/ dryer inckjded 
Availabis August 1 , 
51325/ month Call Nick 

785-282-0799 

ONE TO five-bedroom 
apartments and houses 
Ctoso to cempus 
7B5 5391975 Of 

795-313-8292 

One year lease June 
2007 to May 2008 Excel- 
lent distance to walk to 
campus Can Mrs Kim 
913-661-9959 
SEVEN TO eight-bedroom 
IIWD kitchen) June. July. 
August Alliance Properly 
Management 
785-539-4357 www rent- 
epm.com 

SiTBEBRCSn — ITwC 

kitchen). June, July, Au- 
guet Alliance Property 
Managemeni 
785-539-4357. wwwrenl 
apm.oom 



SPACIOUS FOUR-BED- 
ROOM, two bath 
Washer/ dryer, nice 
kitchen Near City Park 
Available May 1 $1100/ 
montti plus utilities. 
785-313-1886 

THREE, FOUR, RVE, SIX 
PLUS BEDROOMS Look- 
ing lor that pedecl tiome 
10 tarP Oreal selection 
and prices. Capstone 
Management 
785-341-0686 

THREE BEDROOM 
HOUSE at 1721 Ander- 
son Available June 1 Un- 
furnished, otf-slreet park- 
ing S750 per montlt. Call 
KSU Foundation at 
785-532-7569 or 
765-532-7541. 

THREE-BEDROOM, 
TWO bath, one mile west 
ol campus. Washer and 
dryer provided, $1000 per 
month 785-313-7473 

THREE-eeOROOM 
JUNE, .luly August Al- 
liance Property Manage- 
mani 785-539-4357 www,- 
rent- apm, com 

TWO-BEDROOMS 
JUNE July, August Al- 
liance Proparly Managa- 
mant 785-539-4357 www.- 
lent dpm, com 




CONOOS FOR SALE- 
Two and thtee-bedioom 
starling al $112,650 COlle- 
gialevillaeom 
785-537 2096 

FABULOUS UPDATED 
lour-bedroom, one and 
one-halt bath, brick ranch 
home located west ol 
KSU $149,900 Call 
765-539-6751 




FEMALE HOUSEMATE 
No drinking' smoking 
$295/ month. One-lhird 
utiilties, washer/ dryer. Au- 
gust taase ami- 
ca313@ksu edu. 
785-537-1464 

??BI7lE — ^66mmAVe 

wanted through July Two- 
bedroom duple> Washer' 
dryer, and storage $350 
per nx>nth plus one-tiaH 
utilities Amanda 

9)3 226-4838 

MALE. WALK lo class, aii 
lurnished, tower level, 
wasf^er dryer without me- 
ter No smoklhg, drinking 
pets. 785-539-1554 

ROOMMATES NEEDED 
for two tjodfooms in tive- 
bedroom house Neiit lell 
Ck>se to campus Outdoor 
pels wekome 

620-382-7241 

TWO ROOMS available in 
four -bedroom house, fe- 
male nwmmales wanted 
$290 pkjs utilities 
316-461-2317 Or 

913-206-5785 



FEMALE SUBLEASERS 
wanted two-bedrooms 
available summer lease 
$260 plus uUlities' month 
one block from campus 
785-632-0606, 

fuBLfX5Rr-fJEEB!B 

for Spring 2007 senwstaf, 
$315/ month Fow-bed- 
room apartment, flrat 
month's rant paid, cheep 
uvlilies 913-495-2558 or 
913-406 1034 

SUBIEASEH WANTED 
Available now, htro-bed- 
room apartment Newly 
renovated $570/ month 
Call 785-488-8443 

THREE -BEDROOM 
APARTMENT two blocks 
10 campus close to Ag- 
gieville Rent $3{X)/ per- 
son Call 78522 1-6680 

TWO-BEDROOM APART- 
MENT walk to campus, 
$620/ rmrvth includes uMh 
ties 785-275-1409 leave 
message 



E niployment , Career s 




AS NEEDED JUVENILE 
INTAKE AND ASSESS- 
MENT 



nsUOCU ls*eo«fAng appn- 
cabons lor several as 
In- 
offi- 
cers. MMmum ftqulte- 
nwnts Inckjde e high 
school dfpkjma Hourly 
rale for caN-out duty la 
$10, On-call reimburse- 
ment IS $30/ day, On-caM 
oincars worii a roltling on- 
call schiadule. wHh tfte 
usual schedule being one 
weak of on-caN duty every 
8- 10 weeks. Law enloTOa- 
rnent experierKe or direct 
eJiperience working wfth 
)uvenllee Is preferred. 
Valkl driver's Ik^nse and 
eblinv to work flexible 
hioura la mandatory Appli- 
catkins can be obtained 
Irom Riley County Ckirk's 
Oflice. 110 Courthouse 
Plaia, t^nhsttan, KS 
66S0I2, or vIsM out web- 
site. www.fUaysDuntyfca.- 
gov. Riley County is en 
equal opportunity em- 
ptoyar 

BAR TENDING I $300 a 
day potential. No eiperl- 
anca nacessary Training 
pimldad. Cal 

1 -800-466-6520 ext 144 

CAMP TAKAJO Naples 
Mair^. noted for pic- 
turesque iaksfrortl kica 
tk)n. exceptional lacilltieB, 
Mk)- June tfvough mid 
August, Counsator posi 
Ikms m tennis, 
baskettiaH, 

lacrosse, god, n*g foot- 
ball, roller hotkey, swim- 
ming, sailir^, water skiing, 
gymnastics, dance, ftorse- 
bock riding. aicftery, 
weight training, newspa- 
per, photography, vkteo. 
woodworking, ceramics/ 
pottery, crafts, line arts. 
sl^er leweirir, copper 
enamel, nature study, ra- 
dky electronics, itieater 
costumer, piano accompa- 
nist, music instrumental- 
ist, backpacking, rock 
dimbing, canoeing/ kayak- 
ing, ropes course, sacre- 
tanal. narmy Can Takajo 
at 666-356-2267. Submit 
applk:3tkin onNne at 
takaio com, 

EVENING CARETAKER 
Position: Part-tlmo care- 
taker position. First United 
Metfudist Church, Man- 
hattan, Kansas Responsi- 
ble lor cleaning, custodial 
servlcea, security and kxk 
up for the church m tf>e 
evening hours between 
5:00 p.m, and 9:30 p,m 
Monday through Thurs- 
day Position description 
and empkxyment applica- 
tnn available at the 
church olfioa. 612 Poyntz 
Avenue, or by calHng 
785-776-6821 , 

HARVEST HELP wauled. 
Late May Ihmugh Auguft, 
Pays well 785-587-1956. 
eveniiigs. 





HAY COMPANY in 


search 


ol atJiTvner 


workers, term 


•HpMlance 


needed. 


Excel- 


iMItwaBes 


765-564-2590 



HOflTICULTURAL SER- 
VICES, Inc Is seeking reli- 
able, motivated indrvklu- 
ais lor M-Nnne ot part- 
Uma si Mo nal poaMons in 
our ratal gii^ canter 
Above average wages 
oornmensurete with expe- 
ri«nce and abilities, A^kply 
n parson at 11524 Land- 
scape Lone, St. Oeorge. 
Kansas 765-494-2418 or 
785-778^)397. 

HOWE LANDSCAPE Inc 
has several poeltrans 
available for our landscap. 
ing, imgatkin and mowir>g/ 
maintenance crews. Tins 
is for full Unve arvd part 
time help, with flexible 
schedules for sludanls. 
preferably lour hour 
bkscks of time. AppHcantt 
must be 18 yaatt at age 
and have a vaHd drivera li- 
cense Starting wage is 
$8 00/ hour Apply three 
ways, ki parson Monday 
through Friday at 127S0 
Madison Rd in Riley: call 
785-465-2857 to obtaki 
an applteatton: or e-mail 
us at hsweiondeKAnMS.- 
wl 

JOIN THE K -State Online 
team at the OftH^e ot Medi- 
ated Education, and con- 
tribute to a variety ol Im- 
portant K-State web sites 
and appticaliaos. Candi- 
dates must be moUvaled, 
capable ol learning new 
skills quickly, ' seW-dl- 
reclad, able to wodc at 
least 15 flours a week, 
and wlHing to devote at 
least a year to the posl- 
1k>n. Workkig with vreb 
technoiogleB m an office 
that values its shidents 
provides a fun yet cfial- 
leriging work environment 
Starling wages begin at 
$7.00. For more informa- 
tion errtail us at omeol- 
ticeiSksuedu, 

LOOKING FOR part-Ume 
hielp In ScrapCook store 
Monday- Wednesday- Fri- 
day daytime Experience 
preferred Please call Sab- 
rina 785-410-3177 

LUNCHROOM/ PLAY- 
GROUND SUPERVI- 
SORS Immediste open- 
ir^s- Manhattan- Ogden 
Elementary Schoota, 
$6 SO per ftour one and a 
half- two fKHjrs per day 
11:00 am,- ^XX) p m A) 
plicatk>n available at www 
usd383 org/Distrlcl/Hu 
manResourcat/ or sppl, 
at Huthan Resources De 
parlment, 2031 Poynti Av- 
enue Applk^ations ac- 
cepted until positions are 
liHed Apply to Manhatton- 
Ogden USD 383, 2031 
Poyntz Avenue. Mantial- 
lan, KS 66502. 
785-587-2000. Equal Op- 
portunHy Etnptoyer. 



MATH TEACHER USD 
376 Is acoapttng applica- 
tions lor a high school 
'math teacher Contact 
Becky Pufti at 

bpultz@usd378 com or 
785-485-4000 

NOW HIRING Frklga 
Whoiaaaia Uquor. 10- 20 
houtt par weak. Apply 



OWN YOUR own buai- 
nesel Make sorrte antra 
monayi Low start up cost! 
Call 785-341 7201 or go 
to www mymonavie 

corrVLTMatthews 

PART TIME cashier and 
selae associale r>eeded. 
Must be available 
evenings and weekends. 
Apply at Mkhvesl Ace 
Hardware. 800 Tuttle 
Creek Blvd 

PLAY SPORTS' Have 
fun! Save moneyl Maine 
camp needs lun kmng 
counsek>rs to teach All 
larMj, adventure and wsler 
sports Great summer i 
Can 868-844-8060. apply: 
campcedarcom 

PROGRAMMER CIVIC- 
PLUS is lt>a nation B (ead- 
Ifig provider of City. 
County, and ScfXWl web- 
sites Full-Ume poanton in 
Manhattan Microsoft ASP 
and SOL expedence ra- 
qulred $15 50/ tiour plus 
tiriie and a hall lor over- 
bme Benefits Include 
Health. Dental. PaM Hol- 
deys. Paid Vacatkm. and 
401 K matching. Email re- 
sume in Microsoft Word or 
text lormat to jobaOl^lc- 
p<ua,com, 

PROJECT MANAGER 
CIvtePlus has an opening 
in our Manhattan head- 
quarters oflice for a full- 
time project manager. 
This challenging position 
entails managing muHipie 
website redesign protects 
from start to finish Posi- 
tkm requires attention to 
detail, the ability to man- 
age muftiple tasks, prioh- 
ties and deadlines and a 
cheerful attlhjde Training 
IS provided Bonekts in- 
clude fiealth dental, paid 
holkjays, paid vacation 
and 4011k) matching 
Ema» resume in text or 
Word lormat 10 

fibs @ civk:plus .cam. 



THE COLLEGIAN cannol 

vartfy the financial potan- 
llal of advenltamants In 
Ilia Empfoymanl/Caraar 
elaeslficatlon. Raadare 
are advlead lo approach 
any such business oppor- 
tunity wHh raa- 
sonat>ie cau- 
tion. The Collegian urgaa 
our readers to contact (ha 
Batter Buslnaes Bureau. 
501 SE JelferBOn. 
Topaka. KS 86607-1190. 
a86>232- 0454. 




Campus 

Phone 
Book 

Get it 



NOW HIRING! 

Management 



Are y<Hi confident, povtrvt. fku pKtd. 
fndemhuiutw^ 

ftirirt Kini % p^ M«(«h4f tin «nd Imv Don CK> 
#« boJunitof rthih orvntfd mdinduili u pew 




irtAr wiM tram ih« ngfit indviAji' from (hff fnund naor vp 

Wt <tffrf J cDffipcfflivf uldiry Mv!f twrifhl packj|P bw^0<) cuttt 



I Itteraipaid tvtcMtian fritfH 
Mitrtthty H Amnttmi Ahiim firogtmm 



4e^4Jii4taiM JXfa 




Service Diredory 



AUGUST- DECEMBER 
laaaa Mole roommate 
wanled Studious, non- 
smoking Four bfcicks 
from campus Ofl- street 
parking Free washer/ 
dry er 785-341-7171. 

CHRISTIAN FEMALE 

seeks Iwo female room- 
males starling fall 2007 
August 10 May lease. New 
three-bedroom, two balh 
house wWt washar/ dryer 
$360 plus one-third utili 
lies Call 847-975-1484 



FEBRUARY AND March 

paid Female roommate AKC ENGLISH MasUlls- 

wonted nowi Nk:e three- male and lemaies- 

tiedioom apartment, one bnndles. aprkMs and 

btock Irom campus $270/ fawns All ages 

month, one-third ulWies 765-539-0227 $800- 

765-3179021 $1000 



Sick of your 

Roommates? 

Find a subleaser by advertising 
in the classifieds. 
Call 785-532-6555. 

COLLLC;iA\ 



PROJECT MANAGER. 
CIvicPlus haa an opening 
In our Manhattan head- 
quarters olhce lor a full- 
time Pmjeel Manager, 
This Challenging posttk>r 
entails managing muKlpia 
website redesign pro|ecls 
from start to finiah Posi- 
tion requires attehUon lo 
detaU. the abiuty lo man- 
ega miM^ task, pdort- 
tta« and daadMias and a 
chaarful attitude Tralnktg 
IS provided Bereflta in- 
clude hieelth, Dental. Paid 
Hotdays, PaM Vacation 
and 40l(k) matching 
EmaH resume in text ol 
Word fomial to [Obs®- 
civicplus com. 

VILLAGE INN, join our 
team I Now hinng full -time 
and part-time servers and 
hosts and pen-time cooks 
at our Manhattan, KS 
restaurant Competitive 
wages, frier>dty environ 
ment, greet benefits and 
opporlunltlea lor advance- 
ment Apply in person at 
the Manhattan VKIage Inn. 
204 TuWIe Creek Blvd 
Equal Opportunity Em- 
pkiyer. 

WILDCATSNEEOJOBS - 
COM, PAID survey takers 
needed In Manhattan, 
100^9 Iree to )Oin Clk:k on 
surveys 

WINTER/ SPR)f«j Posi- 
tions Available Earn up to 
$150 per day Experience 
not required Undercover 
stioppers needed to fudge 
retail and dinir^ establish- 
ments Call 800-722-4791 





EOE 



Burger King n seeking high-wiergy proplf to join our 
mtaurant family. If you are xeking i pwition thai 
can offer a growth ladder leading to minjgemcnt and 
a tolid benefit pick age, piravf come complete an 
application We ue taking applications for all ihifts 
Weoffrr: 

■ Competitive ilartlng utages 

■ Paid vacation program for atl staff members 

■ 1/2 price on/off duty meati 
e Free uniforms 

e Frequftil perfarmance/talary ei/aluations 

B Ftexibie tcheiluiing 

e Tuition reimburtemeni program 

e Retirement program 

e Savingt bond purchate program 

l^*f *ritr — li*4tHM CHV « 



I i;il . *m« Ol i(M\i AraHtfiV" 





Pregnancy 
Testing Center 

539"3338 



5u|do|ku 

Fill in the grid so that every row, 

every coluinn, and every 3x3 box 

contains the digits 1 through 9 

with no repeats. 



8 



3 2 



9 



3 
9 4 
5 8 



1 8 



Solution and tips 
at www.sudoku.corn 



' 7w -III Uiij'f. l\c,ll lUf: Rt ■,l', 0}>tti>l» 

Vtw prvjjftiini') ivslint: 

Iniiilly iiiiiriili-itlinl HTiiii' 

,Saiilr du> rrsulLs ' C'^ll t'tir iip|MHitliiiriil 

[ (kkdk'J JvTIit^ IlliTti ^^itttniv III ,'\[lil('lsLL|i Vlliil^'4 

Miiii -li I 'I ,t 111 ■ ^ (1 ill 



Oeddfines 



Oanificd adi mutt be 
placed by no<in the day 
before you want your ad 
f» run. CleHlfitd display 

«4i muf I be ptated by 
4 p m Iwo working days 

prior to the date you 

want ypur od to run, 

GUI 78S-$32 GS5S 



COACH BOB Huggins 
bobblehead dolls, Untitad 
editwn, in original txix. 
two avanalJte. make offer 
or trade Call Dallas si 
513 522-1048 

HIDE A bed couch $100 
or best offer Table and 
four chairs, $225 or best 
offer Stove $100 or beat 
offer 785-539-0227 

KINO SIZE walerbed. 
complate setup includes 
frame sfieets. liner, mat- 
tress and pad $200 
785-587-5720 

POOL TABLE lor sale 
Good condiUon Call 
785-564-1465. 




Ctaiiified Rates 



1DAV 

10 words or lest 

1 10.50 

each word ever 20 
20( per word 

2DAY$ 
20 wordt or le» 

$12.95 

•*<ti word over 20 

2S< per word 

IDAYS 

10 worth or ItH 

$156% 

each word over 20 

XX per word 

4 DAYS 

20 woidls or less 

$n,90 

each word over 20 

35< per word 

5 DAYS 

20 words or lest 

$20.00 

tech word over 20 

40< per word 

(consKutiy* day rata) 



ro Place An Ad 



Go to K«d«ie 103 (acroM 

from the K -State 

Student Uniorv.) Offite 

houri are Monday 

through Fr iday from 

S a.m. to S p,iyi. 



Wow To Pay 



All ctatiifieds muit be 
paid in advance unlesi 
you have an account 

with Student 
Publications Inc Cath, 
tfietk. MasterCard or 

Vlia are accepted 

There i* a SJS service 

charge cxi all returned 

checkt We reserve the 

nght to edit reject or 

properly clanify any ad 



Free Found Adi 



A) a tarvlce to you, we 

run found edt for three 

dayf free of charge 



Corrections 



If you find an error In 

your ad. ptcaie call us. 

tMr accept rnponvbillty 

only few tfve lir^t wrong 

insertion 



Cancellations 



If you iell your Item 

before your ad hat 

enpired, we will refund 

you for the remaining 

days. You must call ui 

before noon the day 

tMfore the ad it to be 

publlihed. 



Headlines 



For an entra charge, 

we'll put a headline 

above your *d to catch 

the reader'i attention 



Categories 




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l-nipk>VHH'nt i^iii-ots 




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wm 



TViiTuportatlon 




Ttcivt'l Trips 



MMMiamM 



iMmmi 



wmm 






ARTS I ENTERTAINMENT | SEX | FOOD | YOUR ilFE 

THE EDGE 



Friday, Feb. 23, 2007 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 14 



v^nrMAf^TTRE 



H: W ThtOfanani 




ThtOfanani 
to marfc your | 

TmuiII(0m hHdM 

MWll WtN W lb MtrtM 

night. 

'denottJwhowttMrtl 

ihouklwln 

' d«noi« oui pndktloiM of 

who will «rtn 



ACHtiVEMfNTIN 
AITTOfRtCnOM 

Qllnifnglrb' 

D "Hit Good ShepVnr 
p'hfntliityTlntt) 





I «. TMs SMidty, tilt kit cf l|t k«fl «i 



BEST MOTION 
PICTURE OF THE 
YEAR 

L I ■'Babel" 

a -•^e Departed* 

O "Letters from Iwo Jirrw' 

□ "Little Miss Sunshine' 

□ The Queen" 



ACHnvamrr 

aNiM«TQ«IIAPHY 

glhcBbdlMiKi' 
Q tM^ft of IM* 
Q TlltliliiifMiit' 
0*Pw'fUlf|ffMK' 



ACHIEVEMENT IN VISUAL EFF 

G 'Pinrt« o< th» CiiilibMn Ond Man'i Ctmr 

D'lteeMofl' 

G 'Supemwi NetunH* 



' Live ACTION SHORT FILM 

nU f to Gnn Mri'iBinti and ttw Onral tit*} 

OlrwDot ftem' (One Too Many) 
.D'HtJnwr&Sofl- 

I^INHteankSttify 



PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR 
IN A LEADING ROLE 

n LeonanJo OiCaprio 'Blood Diamond* 
; J Ryan <k)sling - "Half Nelson' 
aPeterOloole-'Veflus' 
l} 'Will Smith - The PuRUlt of Happynesi* 
: forest Whrtaker Ttie Last King of Scotland" 



II 



OIU€lNALSCReENrLAV 

OlObBtemlwJhM' 
O'UnlFMtHSuiBhlne' 

D-ftn^Uhyimiti- 



ACHIEVEMENT 
IN DIRECTING 

0.*Th*Dfpart«r ^^ 
Difitos from two Mtt'. 
O'TKeQBMiv' 
^•UnttedW- 



BEST 

ANIMATED 
FEATURE 
FILM OF 
THE YEAR 

□ -•-Cars" 

□ *HappyFeef 

□ 'Monster House" 



OOCUMENTARY FEATURE 1 
UftanfvT [ 



PERFORMANCE BY AN 
ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE 

G Penelope Cruz "Volver" 

D Judi Oench - "Notes on a Sandal" 

□ -Helen Mirren - The Queen" 

□ "Meryl Streep - 'The Devil Wears Prada* 
D Kate Winslet- "Little Children" 



)%K 



fiTEfirodiKmoM ptcrvRf s 

rORMNMAtSOM) 






O fm Incomeiuem Truth' 

OlaqlnFfagmnti' 

Q'kmOinp' 

D •% Country, My Country 




ACHIIVEMENTtN 
MUSIC WRITTtN 
FOR MOTION 
PKTURCS 
(OHWilAL SCORE) 

nili«6«4G<tmM* 

>- ■' nttlH 0^ A S 

LjTIieOoiCT' 



PERFORMANCE BY 
AN ACTRESS IN A 
SUPPORTING ROLE 

n Adrtana 8arraza "Saw 
i -] Cate Blanchett - 'NotM on a Scandal" 
'■ 'Abigail Bretltn • 'Uttle Miss Sunshine* 
LJ -Jennifef Hudson - 'Dreamgitls" 
QRInbKikuchi-'Babcr 




Academy needs to add more categories 




BRENDAN 
PKAECER 



The Academy Awards suppos- 
edly represent ihc highest honor 
in acting and filmmaking. But \ 
don't get to vote 
on them, so they're 
definitely nut a$ 
cool as they could 
be. 

Each year, ac- 
tors, actresses and 
filnds get the shaft 
from the academy. 
As a jaded fun of 
the film industry, 
I'll set the record 
Straight by giving my own awards 
and introducing a couple of catego- 
ries to include films the Oscars tend 
to neglect. 

•EST PICTURE: -THE DEPARTED" 

Martin Scorsese finally returns 
to the top of his game with the best 
movie of the year The entire cast 
was incredible, from powerful lead 
pcrfunnances from Matt Djmon, 
Leonardo OiCaprio and Jacii Nich- 
olson to top-notch supporting turns 
from Mark Wahlbcrg, Alec Baldwin 
and Martin Sheen. The rumors 
that Scurccse might turn the film 
into a trilogy arc intriguing, despite 
the shortage of living characters 
at the end of the film It's his best 
film since "Goodfellas.' and it's a 
welcome return to form. Hunorsbtc 
mention goes to "Pans Labyrinth" 
and "Children of Men" 



BEST ACTOR: MATT DAMON, 
-THE DEPARTED" 

Almost anyone who appeared 
in "The Departed" deserves an 
award, but Damon's pcrformajice 
went above and beyond. Just watch 
the elevator scene at the end of the 
movie From now on, it should be 
mandatory for Damon to use his 
Boston accent in every role. 

BEST ACTRESS: IVANA 
BAQUERO, "PAN'S LABYRINTH" 

Helen Mirren probably will win 
for her role in "The Queen," but 1 
didn't see it, so she gets nothing. 
Baquera's performance was the 
most memorable one I saw this 
year, even though I couldn't under- 
stand what she was saying (the film 
is in Spanish) Honorable mention 
goes to Natalie Portman for "V for 
Vendetta ■' It's a shame critics forget 
movies simply because they aren't 
released in November or Decem- 
ber 

BEST ANIMATED FILM: 
"A SCANNER DARKLY" 

Richard Linklater's flick proves 
animated films don't have to aim 
toward the younger audience. Any- 
one who thinks 'Happy Feci" de- 
serves this award should be beaten 
with sticks. Just because a movie is 
pretty doesn't mean it's good. 



BEST COMEOIC PERFORMANCE: 
WILLFERRELL, "STRANGER 
THAN FICTION' 

The Academy needs to adopt 
this category, because comedies 
traditionally get no respect. Steve 
Martin could have been rewarded 
for "The Jerk," Jack Black for 
■School of Rock" and Jeff Bridges 
for "The Big Lebowski " Will Ferrell 
delivered the the best performance 
of his career, save for maybe "Old 
School" Honorable mention goes 
to Jeff Anderson for "Clerks 2," 
Garrison Keillor for "A Prairie 
Home Companion" and, of course, 
Sacha Baron Cohen for "Borat." 

BEST SEQUEL: -CLERKS 2" 

It's rare to see a sequel that isn't 
an obvious attempt to capitalize on 
the box-office revenue of its pre- 
decessor "Clerks 2" checks in on 
Kevin Smith's foul-mouthed Quick 
Stop cashiers 10 years later, and 
the result is not only the funniest 
film of the year but also one of the 
few sequels that doesn't seem un- 
necessary It sets the stage for the 
triumphant return of Jay and Silent 
Bob. Honorable mention goes to 
"Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead 
Man's Chest" It wasn't spectacular, 
but it was entertaining, and Johnny 
Depp is at the top of his game 
With a big-budget sequel, it's hard 
to ask for much more. 



BEST ACTION MOVIE: 
-CASINO ROYALE" 

The Bond franchise went 
through its hair-mctsl stage with 
the last few films, but Daniel 
Craig's first attempt put the series 
back in the right direction Like 
"Batman Begim" jved in 2005, 
sometimes a seri^ . .. jeyond sav- 
ing, and the best thing to do is to 
start over from the beginning. 

MOST DISAPPOINTING MOVIE: 

'SUPERMAN RETURNS" 

Bryin Singer made one of the 
best comic book adaptations ever 
with "X-Men 2" Why did a direc 
tor capable of making an awesome 
action movie turn Superman's tri- 
umphant return into a chick flick? 
1 hope this doesn't start a trend, 
because if "Transform ers" or "Live 
Free and Die Hard" forget they're 
supposed to be action movies, I 
might riot. 

WORST MOVIE: "HAPPY FEET" 

I'm a fairly happy person, so 
when an animated penguin movie 
forces me to contemplate suicide 
for two hours, you know it's bad. 
Honorable mention goes to "The 
Break-Up" Vince Vaughn always 
walks the line between amusing 
and jerk This time he walked on 
the wrong side of the line. 



MOVIE TIMES 



■ Tinti f»r today thrmigh Sunday. 

■ (} dtnotti times paying Saturday and 
Sunday only. 

* Now movies at SottiOiikbanonuthb 



*'ThtNumb«3};R,Hnlii. 

(2:1S),<:S0, 7:05,10:00 

Waltff Sparrow (Jim Cinvyl b«(OfTws obsessfd 

wllti i twok th^t Afptin (0 be bdted on Ms fif; 
but ends with a murder that has yet to happen in 
re^l life. 




* 'Tlw Astronaut Fa rm«r,'K, 104 m In, 

(2:10), 4:SS, 7:20,9:50 

NASA astronaut Charles f amwr (Billy Bob Thorn- 
ton) is forced to retire \n order to save his famiiy 
fam) Gut he can't give up his dream of space 
travel and looks to build his own rocket, despite 
the government's threats to stop him. 

• 'Kcno 911!: Miami; R, 81 min. 

(2:301,4.30,7:15,9:35 

A ragtag team of Reno (ops is called in to save 
the day after a terrorist attack disrupts a national 
police convention in Miami Beacl^ during spring 
bleak. Based on the Comedy Central series. 




'Bridge to Terabtthla.'Pfi, W min. 
(1:S0), 4:25,7:20, 9:45 

^ititllMfr,'PG-13,110intn. 

(1:15,21,4,4:45,7,7:45,9:30,10:10 

'BrMdi.'P&ll.nOmin. 

(1:45), 4:45, 7:30, 10:05 




'Music and lyrio,' R, 104 mIn. 

(11.4,7,9:45 

Tyltr Perry's Daddy's Unic tiiris," P6-13, 

(2:201,4:55,7:10,9:40 

'NwUt,'P&-t3,102min. 

(1:301,4:20,7:25,10 

'T1ieM«Jseflg»R,"P€-tJ,91mlB. 

(2:201,4:30,9:55 

ItcauK I SaM S«,'P(i-1], 102 mtn. 

(2*51,4:40,7:05,9:40 

"Night at the Museum,' PG, 109 min. 

7:30 

— wwmxtirmlkt.tom. CiH (TSS) 77(-9SM 
fef»how times. 



MOST POPULAR 
MOVIE RENTALS 

These are the most popular rented DVDs sent to 
Man hattan through Netflit, com. 

Top movie rentals this week 

1 . "Carlos Mencia: Not for the Easily Of- 
fended Live in San Jose" 

2. "Saw the last Dance 2" ""■" 

3. "Harry Potter and the Goblet of File* 

4."8eeff«t' 

S.'SharkTale' 
6.''MySuperEx-6trfWend' 




7, "Broken Bridges" 

8. "Open Season" 
9.%iplojteof tt» MorttftlflOfi) 

10. 'National Lampoon's Pledge ThisI' 




0k. "^^tfi 



KANSAS STATE 

OLLEGIAN 



INSIDE 

Check out 
two fiill pages 
of good ol' 
rodeo fun 



www.kstatecolJcgiancom 



Monday, February 26, 2007 



!4 



Holland, 

Junior In 

wom*fl't 

itudlts. 



Ktndrd Smith, 
iophorr>ore In 
psychology, 
Miss Rodeo K- 
State Saturday 
evening at the 
K'State Rodeo. 

Chrlitophar 
Hanawinckd 

* (OLLEGIAN 




Rodeo queen promotes K-State 



8y Allison VorU 

ltAK*SWIt(OlltGI*N 

The new face of K-State rodeo re- 
ceived her crown and belt buckle Sat- 
urday night at the K-State Rodeo in 
Weber Arena. 

Kendra Smith, sophomore in psy- 
chology, became Miss Kodeo K-State 
after competing against two other 
women in the pageant 

"It was a big rush to get the crown, 
buckle and sash," said Smith. "My little 



brother is already jealous of my belt 
buckle" 

The women competed in five events 
including horsemanship, which last 
year's pageant winner, Meredith Hol- 
land, junior in women's studies, said is 
an important part of being Miss Rodeo 
K-State, 

"You cant realty go into a rodeo 
queen pageant and not know how to 

Stt MISS RODEO Pi9« 11 



Roping in tlie rain 

Rodeo goes*smoothly despite weather 



By Scott Ginird, Kriiten Ro<l«rick 
and Eric Davit 

UNVASSMIKOIUCIAN 

Even the horses were riled up and trying 
to break free of the gates before the start of 
the annual K-State Kodeo last weekend in 
Weber Arena. 

Although the et^nt oSiciatly started Fri- 
day morning, the general public came to 
watch at 7:30 p.m. Friday 

Contestants from 15 different colleges in 
Kansas and Oklahoma competed in a variety 
of events including different types of bullrid- 
ing. calf roping, barrel racing and steer wres- 
tling. 

"The first night was pretty dam smooth," 
said Matt McKinstry, K State rodeo coach. 
"Ufe were trying to shoot for a three-hour 
performance, and we got it in about t^vo 
hours and 50 minutes" 

Several competitots also said they were 
pleased with the management and organiza- 
tion of the event. 

"1 really like the team here and how diey 
have it set up," said Cody Taylor, freshman 
member of the rodeo team at Southwesten 
Oklahoma State University. "They ran it 
pretty quick and got everybody in and out 
smoothly." 

McKinstry said approximately 1,500 
people attended Friday night. Saturday 
night, the arena was nearly full with about 
3,000 people TTie crowd was a blend of K- 
State students, area residents and family and 
friends of the competitors. 

"I was surprised at how many people 
other than college kids came to this ewnt," 
said Sammi Lawrence, freshman in animal 
sciences and industry. 

IVtylor said he enjoyed the atmosphere 
and the venue at Weber Hall 

"1 love the arena," Taylor said. "It's so 
small, which is real good (or most of the 
events" 

The rodeo was the first event of this se- 
mester for the K-State rodeo team and sev 
eral of the other colleges McKinstry said ev- 
erything went weU and there were no major 
problems. 



"Being the first rodeo coming out, people 
still are trying to get back in the groove of 
things with what they're doing," he said. "But 
it's not going too bad." 

Though Friday was the first day of the 
event, some competitors - including Taylor 
- were knocked out of the competition ear- 

ly 

tbylor, who competed on the bareback 
buU-riding competition Friday, said he was 
hoping to win the event, but he got bucked 
off the bull just before the timer ran out and 
spent the next two days helping his team 
with whatever they needed. 

Rodeo -goers endured cool, rainy weather 
and a leaky ceiling Saturday night during the 
second evening of K-State's aruiual rodeo. 

Temperatures were in the mid -30s when 
the rodeo began at 7:30 p.m., according to 
weather.com It was about 25 degrees and 
lightly snowing when the night was over. 
While the rodeo was at an indoor arena, an 
open door kept the arena chilly. 

"We were in and out a loC said Beth Mc- 
Quade, junior in animal sciences and indus- 
try. "We were free ring .. it's a port of rodeo." 

The weather did not seem to Coze spec 
tators, as those in the nearly-crowded arena 
watched events ranging from bareback bronc 
riding to barrel racing. 

Seth Daly, graduate student in animal sci- 
ence, helped with the roping chute and said 
even though the cooler temperatures made 
the crowd a little quieter, he was impressed. 

"1 thought it was a decent crowd despite 
the weather and the ticket prices," he said. 

McQuade said the weather didn't stop 
participants and animals frt)m being full of 
energy Especially in the back alleyway of the 
rodeo 

"TTiere were horses everywhere,'" she said. 
"But it was high energy, and everyone was 
feeling great, it was a lot of fun.'" 

The evening began at Weber Arena with 
Meredith Holland, junior in women's stud 
ies. handing the rodeo queen crown to Ken- 
dra Smith, sophomore in psychology. Hol- 

Sm RODEO Nfc 11 




Catrina Riwion | COUEGIAN 

Scolty Harmon, Coffoyvill* {Kan.) Community Coilcga, partkipat«f in 
the bareback event Saturday dunng the K-State Rodeo at Wet>er Arena. 




Joslyn Brown | COllEG(A»t 
During lh« Sunday matint*, Kalgan McNulty, 4, watah** in avue as 
participants prepare for the wddte bronc event. McNolty $<iid his favorite 
events Saturday evening were the butlriding and calf roping. 



K-State jazz combo to perform in South America 




ByScoltGirard 

KANSAS SUKCOILKIAN 



A group at K-Staie will tour across 
South America, performing for anibas 
sadors, speaking with local residents 
and learning the different cultures. 

The K-State Jazz Combo, a group 
of five hand-picked student musicians 
from the [azz department at K-Statc, will 
make the trip from July 3-26 and visit 
four countnes throughout South Ameri- 
ca 

Wayne Coins, adviser for the group, 
picked the five students and said the trip 
will be one of the biggest endeavors of 
the music department. 



"Iwouldsay it's one of the biggest ad- 
ventures this music department has ever 
seen," he said. 

Coins, «^o will accompany the 
group, said it is a privilege for the stu- 
dents to take the trip and represent K 
State's jazz program. 

"1 think it is a realty rare opportu 
nity for these students to go overseas 
and spend an extended amount of time 
representing the university," he said. "I 
think, for most of them, whether they 
realize it or not, it's prdsably a once in a 
lifetime opportunity " 

TTie members of the group also were 

SerMUParll 



Vol UI.NallO 



Candidates 
spend most 
on T-shirts 



By Logan C. 

KANSAS SIAnCOLiiOAM 



Candidates have spent more 
than $5,000 thus far in the race for 
student body president and vice 
president. 

Filings from the four pairs of 
candidates Friday revealed how 
much each pair has spent so far, 
what candidates spent the mon^ 
on, and in the case of the two biggest 
spenders, who paid for it all 

Jim Mosimann, senior in political 
science and economics, and Nick 
Piper, jimior in finmice, have spent 
the most with $2.76793, according 
to their expense reports 

Matt Wagner. senior in 
information management systems, 
and l^dia Peele. junior in secondary 
education, have spent the second- 
most with $2,527.31. 

Derek Ogan, senior in 
secondary education, and Aaron 
Blush, sophomore in architectural 
engineering, have spent $326.59 

Steven Hiibum, junior in 
chemistry and psychology, and 
Clare Peciey, sophomore in speech, 
have spent $18036. 

Labor and goods donated to the 
pairs counted toward expenses. 

T-shirts, including the costs 
of the shirts and printing, are 
responsible for more spending than 
any other item for all four pairs. The 
candidates have spent $3,420 74 
combined to clothe about 900 
people, 

Hiibum and Feeley's filing 
included $8124 for future T-shirt 
purchases, which would bring the 
total to more than $3,500. 

"It's about getting the logo and 
the names out there in order for the 
people to know who the candidates 
are," Wagner said. 

The second -largt^ expense was 
creating the signs the Mosimann- 
Piper and Wagner-Peele campaigns 
have attached to trees around 
campus. The two pairs bought 250 
signs each and spent $954 78 on 
them, combined. 

Hiibum- Feeley and Ogan- 
Blush did not purchase tree signs, 
according to their filings 

Banners were another significant 
expense used to advertise the 
campai^s. Hiibum and Feeley had 
a barmer worth S 1 2 donated to their 
campaign, Mosimatui and Piper 
spent $240.35 on two banners and 
Wagner and Peele spent $13949 on 
two banners 

Operating Web sites also has 
cost the two largest campaigns 
Mosimann and Piper received a 
$ 1 00 donation to work on their Web 
site, wum.ksu.edu/iimandmck, and 
Wagner and Peele spent $9.24 to 
register the domain wumj.ksyou.orf, 
and designed it themselves 

Some sizeable expenses showed 
up on only one pair's filings. 

Mosimann and Piper spent 
$132.04 on business cards and 
$150 00 for a campaign video that 
had been viewed more than 1,700 
times on Youtube.com as of press 
time. Wa^er and Peele paid $ 144.20 
for 400 cups to give to students. 

Contributions from students and 
local businesses pay for most of the 
candidates' campaign materials. 

SctCANOIMTESP^II 



Today's forecast 

Partiy doiKty, nwming snow 
High: 49 Low: 25 



INSIDE 



At (hf 79th anniul Academy Awards Sunday 
night whit the cetebrities wore was k Imponanl 
ind intMwtiaq a who wii nominjted tor whkh 
honof Turn for a k)ol( at the )ate« d«jgners' 
creattoru and the stars wlw wore them. 

^ttory Pages 



CAMPUS NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 



Costs Rkan pianist 
to pefform at library 

Manuel Matarrita, a pianist Inxn 
Costa Rica will perform at ?: 1 5 p,m. 
In the Kile library Hemisphere 
floom. He has perlomwd in sewal 
venues throughout Latin America 
and in orchestras like the Costa Ri- 
can Natkmal Sytnphony Onhestra. 
The Costa Rkan Student Assocla- 
tkm is sponsoring the evtm. 



SGA primary elKtions 
start Tuesday 

The primary elections for the 2007 
08 Student Gowminq Aisociatton 
eteftions begin xomanwf at 8 a.m. 
Students can vote at httftJ/www. 
k-ftatctilu/tltaioni/ Hie primary 
elettiarts are open until 6 p.m. 
Wednesday. Vk general elections 
wi rvn during the sanw times artd 
dates neit week. 



Eating disorder 
awareness begins 

Sensible Mutrilion and Body Image 
Choices IS host to i week of events 
ia Eating Disorders Awareness 
Week, SNAC events are scheduled 
today through Friday, including 
'Belly dance your way to a better 
body image,' today from 7 g p.m. 
in Union 213. All events ate free to 
Ihe public 



A liCiM Cw^^lM Qfiaie poH asapB rNdei\ MnKB iWHt 

shoutd wHi fiesT Pkture « the Academy AwHdi 




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Page 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, Feb. 26, 2007 



CfttfUn, JooAi and f^flt 



www. dafllnbookixom 



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Fmk: 



(785) 776-3771 
(786; 775- tOM 



Puzzles I Eugene Sheffer 



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weapons 

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13 Storms 

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bravo 

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lady 

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sub- 
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49 Stout 
relative 

49 Halt an 
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remimicfy 

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PNTMZ QUZ WONQNPU 

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PXS UZP X QAOS QZEEZO' 
Friday 'sCryptoquip: TV SHOW CONCERNINQ- 
lA DUO of- a>PS IN J-LORIDA WHt) raODUCE) 
CLAMPS FOR CARPENTERS: 'f^lLiLMI VISE." 
Today '>> Cryptuquip Clue: G uqualD T 



WEIRD NEWS 



Bizarre, funny and unusual stories from around the world 



PROFESSOR FINOS WORLD'S 
HOTTiST CHILI PEPPER 

LAS CRUCES. N M - Paul 
Bosland recalls taking a bite of 
a chili pepper and feeling like he 
WBs breathing fire. 

He gulped down a soda, think- 
ing, "That chili has got to be some 
kind of record." 

Hie Guinness World Records 
agreed, confinning recently that 
Bodand, a regents professor at 
New Mexico State University, 
had discovered the world's hot- 
test chili pepper, Bhut Jolokia, 
which is a naturaily occurring hy- 
brid native to the Assam region ol 
northeastern India. 

The name translates as "ghost 
chili," Bosland said 

"We're not sure why they caJ! 
it that, but 1 think it's because the 
chiU is so hot, you give up the 
ghost M^en you eat it" he said. 

Bhut Jolokia cotnes in at 
1,001,304 Scoville heat units, a 
measure of hotness for a chili. 
It is nearly twice as hot as Red 
Savina, the variety it replaces 
as the hottest By comparison, a 
New Mexico green chili contains 
about 1,500 Scoville units; an av- 
erage jalapeilo measures at about 
10,000. 

'HANNIBAL' OFFERS FEAST 
FOR LITHUANIAN TOURISM 

VILNIUS, Uthuania - If you 
want to meet Hannibal "The 
Caiuiibal" Lecter, a Lithuanian 
tour firm can help. 

In "Hannibal Rising," the novel 
by Thomas Hanis now made into 
a movie, the childhood and youth 
of the fictional man-eating serial* 
killer are set in the Baltic state, 
and the firm is ofiering a themed 
visit to the Lithuanian capital. 

"We hope to attract tourists 
who would be interested in visit- 
ing Lecter's native land,' Aurimas 
Jukna, director of tourism agency 
Saules Kelias, said Thursday. 

The lour includes a trip 
around Vilnius, a visit to a nearby 
estate for a "Hannibal feast" and 



a mating with "Lecter" The cost 
is $131. or 100 euros. 

In "Hannibal Rising," a prequel 
to "Silence of the Lambs," Lecter 
is bom into a noble Lithuanian 
fomi^. He sees his sister killed 
and eaten by militiamen during 
Worid War II, a trauma that later 
turns him to murder and canni- 
balism, f 

MUMMIFIED BODY FOUND 
IN FRONT OF BLARING TV 

NEW YORK - Police called 
to a Long Island man's house di»- 
covered the mummified remains 
of the resident, dead for more 
than a year, sitting in front of a 
blaring television set 

Tlie 70-year-old resident of 
Hampton Bays, NY, identified 
as Vincenzo Ricardo, appeared to 
have died of natural caus«t. Po- 
lice said his body was discovered 
Thursday when they went to the 
house to investigate a report of a 
burst water pipe. 

"You could see his face He 
still had hair on his head." News- 
day quoted morgue assistant Jeff 
Bacchus as saying. 

The house's low humidi^ pre- 
served the bo<iy 

Officials could not explain 
why the electricity had not been 
turned off, as Ricardo had not 
been heard from since December 
2005. 

Neighbors said when they 
had not seen Ricardo, «4]o was 
diabetic and had been blind for 
years, they assumed he was in the 
hospital or a long-term care unit. 

LOST RING COMES 

FULL CIRCLE 20 YEARS LATER 

SOUTH EUCLID, Ohio - A 
college ring lost more than 20 
years ago tv a former undercover 
c^Bcer for the CIA was found in 
an underwater cave off the coast 
of Africa. 

Steve Ruic, a writer on staff at 
Notre Dame College, received an 
e-mail about two weeks ago from 
a professional diver from Germa- 



ny. Wilfried Thicsen wrote that he 
had found a class ring bearing the 
college's name and the year 1976 
while diving off Mauritius 

Ruic publicized the discovery 
in both an e-mail to college staff 
and a newsletter to alumni, but 
no one came forward to claim il. 

Then, while interviewing a 
member of the class of 1976 for 
an unrelated alumni magazine 
story, Ruic asked Dr. Maryellen 
Amato Stratmann if she'd ever 
been to Mauritius. 

"I couldn't brieve iC Ruic 
said. "She said, 'No, but Clare 
Cavoli Lopez has'" 

Lopez, a 1976 Notre Dame 
Clollege graduate and former CIA 
undercover officer, was stationed 
at Fori Louis, Mauritius, from 
1983-85. During a dive, the ring 
tUpped from her finger. 

Ruic sent Thiesen's address 
to Lopez. They ore arranging for 
him to mail the ring. 

MAN BREAKS SQUAT-THRUST 
RECORD ATOP AN ELEPHANT 

CHIANG MAI, Thailand 
- New Yorker Ashrita Furmon 
looked arotmd for a record he 
could break and settied on do- 
ing the most squal thrusts in one 
minute. Then he decided on a 
place - the back of an elephant 
in northern Thailand 

He achieved both goals Thurs- 
day as he climbed onto a platform 
on the back of an obliging pachy- 
derm in blazing heat and powered 
through 40 of the vigorous kicks 
in a minute. The previous squat- 
thrust record - achieved on level 
ground in Britain without an el- 
ephant in sight - was 30. 

Purman, 52, is accustomed 
to setting bizarre records By his 
own count, he has 34, and has 
held 144 in total. 

Purman 's new claim for a re- 
cord will be forwarded, along 
with witness statements, to the 
Guinness World Records 

— www.(m>.tiim 



The planner I Campus bulletin board 



■ The Japanese Appieditlon Assodation imIII mttt A 7 

p.m. Wedivnday in Union 20). 



Iwms In the calendar can bt published up to three times. To 
place an item in the Campus (atendar, stop by Kediie 1 16 and 
fill out a form or e-mail the news editor at (oltegian&ipub.kiu. 
erfu by 1 1 a.m. two days before it is to run. 



The blotter 

Arrests In Riley County 

Reports are taken directly from the Riley 

County Police Department's daily logs. 
The Collegian does not list wheel lofks or 
mlnortrafhcviolatiombecauteofspace * 
constraints. ; 

Thursday, F«b. 22 

■ Disty Emnii Ellb, 3302 Faicman 
Circle, at6:4S a.m. for theft Ektnd was 
$1,000. 

■ Brian Steven John»n, 7}0 Allen 
Road, No, 68, at l.Ii p.m. for failure to ■" 
appear. Bond was $1S8. 

■ Slide Lathell Saylti, Atchinson, Kai\., 
at 4:}S p m for failure to appear. No bond, , 

■ Crystal MaritlMS, 826 DortdeeOrlvt, , 
at 4:50 pm. for failure to appear and no 
proof of liability insurance. Bond was ' ~ 
S2,000. 

■ Thenws t<« Watt Jr., &2S Mission Am.,. 
It 10:5 1 p.m. for driving under the influ- 
ence. Bond was $1,600. 

Friday, Feb. 23 

■ Sptncer James Unruh, 2105 eiaker 
Drive, at 12:J3 a.m. for drivirig under the 
influence. Bond was $1,500. 

■ (van Andrew Cai, 22 1 5 College Ave., ' 
E-1 1 9, at 1 a.m. for obstruction of the legal- ' 
process and disorderly conduct. Bond was ^ 
S 1,500. 

■ Jir«d Claytan Cf aricy, 821 Osage St., , , 
Apt. 6, at 2:58 a.m. for criminal trespass 
Bond was $750. 

■ lauren Vanarsdale Jaduon, 2046 
College HtighK Road, at 1:29 a.m. for ; 
donrwstic battery. Bond was $1,000, 

■ Emma Louise Hall, 6t4Yuma St,, at 
4:10 a.m, for a suspended or cancelled 
drltwr^lianse. Bond was $500. 



Corrections and 
darrfications 

There was an error irt the feb, 19 Col- 
legian. In 1945, the U.S. Marine Corps , 
raised a flag at Iwo Jima. The Collegian , , 
regrets the error. „ 

If you see something that should be 
corrected, call news editor Alex Peak at 
(785) 532-6556 or e-mail (9tltgian§ipub.. 
kiu.tdu. 



Kansas State Collegian 

(USPS 291 020) The Kansas State Col- ; 
legian, a student newspaper at Kansas 
State University, is published by Student 
Publications Inc., Kedzle 103, Manhat- 
tan, KS 66506. The Collegian is published 
weekdays during the school year and 
on Wednesdays during the summer. 
Periodical postage is paid at Manhattan, 
KS 66502. POSTMASTER: Send address 
changes to Kansas State Collegian, 
circulation desk, Kediie 103, Manhattan, 
KS 66506-7167. 
9 Kansas State Collegian, 20O7 



m Urn 



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"The Making of the Fittest" 

DNA and the Ultimate Forensic Rec3ord of Evolution 
{Fr9» ami opmn to public) 



Sean B. Carroll 
University of Wisconsin 



Tliurtday, March 1*<, 7:00 pm 

Forum Hall 

Kansas State University 



Sponsored by Center fbr Underer.indpMi.) <jf i..ihhtin.s 
Kantas Stale University 




ACMEGIFTs 

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MAgdiy ^leclali 

$3 Big Boys 

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EXPLORIHG SRI LANKA 

"An insight to the culture and 
exotic beauty of Sri Lanka" 

Organized by 
Sri Lankan Students' Association 

A talk by Dr. Stephen C. Berfcwilz 
(Department of ReKgious Studies - 

Ulftsoun State University) 
Buddhism and Poetry In Early Modern Sri Lanka 
Date 2eth Feb, 2007 
Time 4:30pfn 
Venue Room 212 K-State Students' Union 

Feature film 

Golden Island: A Documentary on the Country 
known as tha Paari of the Indian Ocean 

Dale 27th Feb, 2007 

Time 5 00pm 

Venue; Little Theater K-Stale Students' Union 



Sponsored 




1:30 pm - 3:00 pm 
Tuesday, February 27 
Hemisphere Room 
5* Floor, Hale Librafv 



Chaos Breeds Life: Imperatives Defining 

tfie Future Relevance and Impact of 

the Academic Research Library 

Dr. James Neal 

Vice President for Information Technotogy & University Ubrahan 
Columbia University 

Hosted by 
Provost M, Duane Nellis 

PriMntitignt (oNowtd by Q t A 

For more irrtofrntlKin. vwH th« Provotl'i <Mb •>•; 

(imp Wmww iuu sduJprovcMl/acadBcnic/leclu'eAndex htm> 

StudertsWetcome 




A comic opera by 

MOZART 
MARCH 1, 2 & 3 

McCain Anditorhim 8 pm ^\ 



ntK 9124428 I Ian loSpn 

IkOria Hoi OeSct or 1 1 1)0 an to ItlO pm 

llStai* tlnloo - U»k ThcaUt Boi Offict 



Prcecnttd by KSU Opera Tbeate 
KSU llcatft aad At Dqtt «r Miuk 



Monday, Feb. 26, 2007 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Pag«3 



Officials discuss 
new e-mail system 



By B«n Htdgii 

KANSAS SIMiCOUECIM 

The campus e-mail sys- 
tem might have a different 
appeanuicc next semester. 

Some Student Governing 
Association members have 
been discussing retiring K- 
State's current provider, 
Webmail, and replacing it 
with a different e-mail ap- 
ph cation. 

Several university offi- 
cials are looking at a num- 
ber of e-mail providers, but 
the one harboring the most 
interest is Google's e-mail 
system, Gmail, said Nicko- 
las Zimmerman, student 
representative for Faculty 
Senate's Committee on 
Technology. 

"We arc trying to find a 
more efficient way for man- 
aging our e-mail system," 
said Zimmerman, senior in 
information systems. 

Zimmerman said the 
change is focused more to- 
ward the student e-mail sys- 
tem to make sure students 
are getting all the messages 
they need, 

Part of the motivation 
for switching email provid 
ers is the amount of "spam," 
or junk mail flooding the 
system, Zimmerman said 

"Spam is an issue we are 
working on combating," he 
said. "It's a big problem 
when forwarding e-mail to 
Webmail" 

Elizabeth Unger, vice 
provost of academic ser- 



vices and technology, said 
the discussion also spurred 
from a general interest in 
the providers 

"Part of the motivation is 
students' comments," Unger 
said "So we are just looking 
into it and asking students 
what they think about it." 

Ben Whitney, senior in 
clinical laboratory science, 
said he uses Gmail and 
thinks it would be great if 
K-State switched. 

"It's a convenience to 
me," Whitney said. "There's 
a lot of flexibility in the pro- 
gram, and its sorting system 
is real nice" 

In addition to filtering 
out junk mail, Gmail also 
features a number of other 
benefits, including the abil- 
ity to search for lost mes- 
sages and a large storage 
capacity. 

Users also can chat while 
on Gmail, making instant 
communication easier 

"As a Web-based applica- 
tion, it's very user-friendly," 
Zimmerman said. "It does a 
very good job of managing 
e-mail." 

The prospect of a new 
e-mail provider stilt is in 
discussion, but Zimmerman 
said the idea could very well 
become a reality. 

"Right now we are doing 
a lot of looking and talking," 
Zimmerman said. 

"Everybody wants to 
take the proper precautions 
in making sure it's in the 
university's best interest." 



Potluck unites international groups 



•y Austin Appit 

KAMASSWIUOllKIAK 

IVo international student groui» spon- 
sored a potluck lunch for international and 
American students Saturday in the Prith 
Community Center in the |aidine Apart- 
ment Complex. 

The potluck featured foods from a vari- 
ety of cultures 

"We put out an invitation to anybody 
who wanted to come," said Stanley Badger, 
graduate student in electrical engineering 
and Webmaster for Mentors for Interna- 
tional Experiences and the bitcmational 
Auociation for the Exchange of Students 
for Ttehnical Experience. 

MIE and lAESTE are campus groups 
designed to help international students find 
jobs, internships and study opportunities in 
other countries. 

"MIE primarily promote stuffy abroad 
while LAESTE sends students on intern- 
ships abroad,' said Olga Lease, adviser for 
both organizations 

Giving students more opporiunities is 
one goal of lAESTE, said Brian Nicely, or- 
ganization president and junior in manage- 
ment 

"We wanted to invite students because 
a lot do not know about study-abroad op- 
portunities, internships abroad and every- 
thing to be able to come out and share with 
people," he said. 

According to the LAESTE Web site, for 
every internship the group promotes in the 
United States, it is able to send a student for 
an internship in another country. 

Nicely said he helped set up the potluck 
to inform students about engineering and 
tectmical studies abroad. 

Karolyn Stoerzinger, graduate student 
in grain science, said she heard about the 
event through an advertisement in the Col- 
legian. 

"I thought it would be an interesting way 
to try diflerent foods, meet new people and 
learn about different cultures," she said 




Aaron Rung | COLitQAN 
Karolyn StcMrzlngar, graduata ftud«nt in grain sclancc *•!* a brownie during a potluck 
dtnner Saturday that promoted two international student programs. 



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OPINION 



Page 4 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, Feb. 26, 2007 



Urr f\D HjIICC I ^^ editonil board selects Hit or Miss topics and writes them after a majority rat«. 
nil Un IVIDj This is the Collegian's official oplr\ion. 




Hit I Possible e-mail upgrades 

Aft« wading Ihraoqh > few hundred quwtioni regjrd- 
ing Dur breast and/or penis vizes ra(h dai^, students should 
wekDme the possibility of a e-mail upgrade from Webmall 
witti open arms G-mail seems to have emerged a ttie 
leading contender, so with any luck, S(>A will finalize 
things In time fot next semestet. 



.^^ 




Miss I K-State women's basketball 

After bringing bai virtually the same team that won the 
women's NIT last year, to call K- State's season a disappoint- 
rtvent would be in understaiemeni losing the lead In the 
final seconds against Iowa State on Sahiiday was another 
low point in K State's tiustiatlrq sDuggle to regain national 
prominence. 




m I Presidential debates heating up 

The race between Sen. Hillary Clinton and Sen. Barad 
Obama finally 901 interesting last week. As journalists, 
nothing ettites us more than the possibility of a knock- 
down, dra^-04Jt political mud-wrestling contest. We'll see 
IfObama's promise to change the tone of politics holds up 
tf Clinton starts throwing punches below Itw belt 




Miss j Mosimann-Piper video 

John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King ir. Neil Amtstrong 
... Jim Mosimann' We think not. While the cheese- tastic 
Intro of Jim Mosimanns and Nick Piper's campaign video 
is amusing, the awkward interviews that follow seem 
contrived. However, it's nice to see candidates trying some- 
thing new We hope to see the emergence of similar entries 
ficifli Other candidates on VouTube.com in the near future. 




Hit jjaizworid tour 



The members of K-State's jaa program traveling 
thh summer to South America have tfyf opportunity to 
represent the university on an international level Adviser 
Wayne Coins called it 'one o( the biggest adventures this 
music department has ever seen.* A successful trip should 
encourage other university programs to leave the COjy 
conhnes of the United Stales more often. 




Miss I Dropping temperatures, potholes 

Last week It looked almost as if spring had arrived as 
Purotsutawney Phil had predicted. Unfertunately, It was all 
a cruel joke This week, we reluctantly will pull our coats 
and hats out of the closet and lace the harsh reality of 
Kansas' schizophrenic weather panems, which have caused 
numerous problems, from the dwreased availability of 
pMni spots to the plethora of potholes on Manhattan 
ilncti 



Oh, the irony 




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Use of sarcasm in comedies, pop culture results in loss of meaning 



Iroi^ is everywhere today, and 
we breathe it like air. Everyone talks 
about "irony" so much the definition 
has blurred somewhat. 

For example, in 1995 
Alanis Morissette wrote the 
song "Ironic," in which she 
described irony as "rain on 
your wedding day" or "a 
no-smoking sign on your 
cigarette break." M many 
commentatora have noted, 
she actually )ust described 
situations that suck. 

But in her defense, that might be 
the entire point. After all. wouldn't 
ycHi call it ironic if she wrote a song 
about irony that was not actually 
about ironic events? 

If it was intentional, then there 
was a gap between what she said 
(these events arc ironic) and what 
she actually meant (this song is 
ironic) This particular variety is 
called "verbal irony," and it has a 
long pedigree. 

Socrates was the first famous 




GREG 
BROWN 



verbal ironist His favorite activity 
was to go around ancient Greece 
pretending to be ignorant to trip 

Others up when they tried to 
justify their opinions to him. 
Today's philosophers call this 
"Socratic irony." Most every- 
one in ancient Greece called 
it "being a jerk." 

Sadly, Socrates couldn't 
stop being a jerk even at his 
own trial, and he drank poi- 
son for it. But the tradition 
continues. 
"The Daily Show" became fa- 
mous for its correspondent reports, 
on which actor /comedians like Steve 
Carell and Stephen Colbert ask 
questions that trip up unwitting local 
folk. Colbert since has gone on to 
star in his own spin -off. "The Colbert 
Report," in which his entire persona 
is one giant wink to the audience. 

But the doivnside to verbal irony 
is it sometimes goes unrecognized, 
with disastrous results. For example, 
if you tried answering the rhetorical 



question earlier in this column about 
irony, you probably looked pretty 
stupid, talking to your newspaper 
and all. 

Another instance took place on 
the "Late Show with David Letter- 
man." which aired Michael Richarcb' 
apology via satellite after a racial- 
epithet -filled rant a few days earlier. 

Many in the audience had not 
seen the video and misinterpreted 
the apology as a joke, forcing Rich- 
ards and Jerry Seinfeld (another 
guest that night) to stop several 
times to insist they were serious 

We live in an era in which we've 
teamed to defuse commercials 
asking s>Tnpathy for the caveman's 
pli^l or jokes rifting on popular 
ftlms. Expecting irony has become 
almost our default stance, one that 
is initially skeptical things are as 
presented. 

Though this is healthy in small 
amounts, the ironic stance is becom- 
ing more and more pervasive. Even- 
tually, we might always expect irony 



and be unable to accept anything as 
sincere no matter what. 

While the possibility is a tad ab- 
surd, some ftnd it to also be debilitat- 
ing in smaller doses. Author David 
Poster Wallace wrote in an wsay 
about television, "Today's irony end* 
up saying: 'How totally banal of you 
to ask what 1 really mean.'" 

Irony is an inherently destructive 
behavior, used to rip apart all sorts 
of idea* without having to propose a 
better choice There's no silver bullet 
to atop its debilitating effects, but 
we can combat them through taking 
care to mean something when we 
speak. 

loin a social movement, have a 
heart-to-heart talk with someone 
else, be something. As E>ink Floyd 
began in its most famous album. 
"Breathe, breathe in the air. 

"Don't be afraid to care." 



Gre; Br«wn Is a lunhir hv phHotophy. Please Mfld 

you* commMts to opinhimpubJatLtdii. 



r /^^f. A N S H S S T * T t 

• Collegian 



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OPINION EXCERPTS | Columns from newspapers around the world 



THE TRUTH ABOUT COAL 

W IHt EMIOfllAl iTAII « THf NtWWRK TIMES 

Last Wednesday, members of 
the Rainforest Action Network, 
a scrappy little advcx:acy group, 
assembled in New York outside 
the Citigroup Center, where Merrill 
Lynch has a branch office. Dressed 
in tup hats, carrying bags of coal 
and calling themselves "Billionaires 
for Coal," the group was protest- 
ing what it felt was the hypocrisy 
of a giant investment bank that 
proclaims a devout commitment to 
"environmental excellence.' even 
as it provides financing (or dirty 
power plants. 

Merrill is a lead underwriter for 
TXU, a Dallas-based utility plan- 
ning to build a dozen coal-fired 
power plants in Texas that will add 
significantly to atmospheric con- 
centrations of carbon dioxide, the 
main global- warming gas Though 
Merrill was tlic protesters' target, 
Citigroup must have been feel- 
ing queasy. It also has trumpeted 
its environmental virtues and is 
among TTCU's lead underwriters 

TTiere is a difteience between 
talk and reality. 



BAD NEWS, GOOD PHOTOS 

CHIN/^OAIIV 

As the night editor on Feb 14 
two years ago, my colleagues and 
1 had racked our brains to choose 
the lead photo for the front page 
the next day. 

At about 8:30 p.m., news broke 
that former Lebanese Prime Minis- 
ter Rafik Hariri had been assassi- 
nated in Ix^anun. 

Despite sympathy my col- 
leagues and I had for the promi- 
nent Lebanese politician, we 
sighed with relief that we had the 
most newsworthy photo at hand 
- wreckage of his motorcade on 
Beirot's scafront with rescuers car- 
rying an injured man. 

In a way, that response is com- 
mon to newsrooms worldwide, 
as testified to by this year's World 
Press Phctto Contest wiruiers 

While praise for the award - 
winning photos abounds, I've 
discovered there are people who 
question the jury's values in 
making their choices 1 think the 
criticism offers food for second 
thoughts abuut photojournalism 
and journalism as well. 



DEBATE IS OVIft — OR IS IT? 

KANSAS CITY STAR 

Tbo bad it's over. 

While it lasted, the global- 
warming debate was an entertain- 
ing free-for-all Then this month 
the U.N Intergovernmental Panel 
on Climate Change came out with 
its latest report. It was if someone 
had pounded a gavel. 

fliose of you still skeptical that 
human activity is the prime cause 
of global warming, well, we've put 
up with your annoying l^ehavior 
long enough Be quiet What's the 
matter with you anyway? 

People began comparing mis- 
guided skeptics to Holocaust de- 
niers Al Core svas a bit less direct. 
His choice of words; "global-warm- 
ing deniers" 

A San Diego Union-lVibune 
media columnist, Carol Goodhue, 
said the controversy no longer 
deserved balanced coverage in the 
newspajxr. 

"Sometimes the facts are so 
overwhelming on one side that it's 
unfair and inaccurate to give equal 
weight to both sides," she wrote last 
week. "This is one of those times." 




RYAN 
SPENCER 



15 minutes 
of shame 



I have a confession to make. 

1 don't care who Anna Nicole 
Smith's baby's daddy 
is. I don't care who 
she was in a relation- 
ship with at any time 
in her life I don't 
care that she appar- 
ently was a complete 
wacko. 1 don't even 
care where she even- 
tually will be buried 

I don't care about 

Britney Spears. J 

don't want to know why she shaved 
her head. 1 don't care how many times 
she go» into rehab I don't care about 
K-Ped's "blossoming" career. 

1 dont care about Lindsay Lohan 
and her screwed -up life. I don't care 
what name a "Grey's Anatomy" CMt 
member calls another. 

Having seen all of these huge news 
■lories play out over the past few 
weeks, I began to ponder why the 
news stations have given these people 
this land of coverage. All they're doing 
b covering the train svreck of these 
peoples' lives and their slow decline 
into IVivial Pursuit pop culture. Wl^ 
do we, as Americans, continue to 
either intently follow these events or 
be subjected to countless hours of 
Howard Stem's sobbing tratimony? 

The answer came to me b, of all 
places, a Maxim article. In an inter- 
view, Christina Aguilera talked about 
the decline of talent and the idea that 
entertainment no longer drives the 
entertainment business - tabloids do. 

Anna Nicole Smith hadn't done 
anything, aside from her brain-numb- 
ing reality show, since 1999. 

Many would say we are obsessed 
and fascinated by celebrities' lives and 
we wish we were as interesting, popu- 
lar and beaut^l as they are. Remem- 
ber, we weren't quite as obsessed with 
them when th^ were being talented 
and productive members of society. 

But my guess is that we are just 
gawkers - you know, people who 
come to a complete stop on the 
highway to watch paramedics pull an 
accident victim from a burning car. We 
don't watch people because they're 
entertaining. We watch them because 
h is like seeing a train wreck. 

Human beings are obsessed with 
watching the self-destroction and 
downfall of others Anna Nicole died 
more than two weeks ago Meanwfiile, 
the media and its audiences still are 
having a field day svatching family and 
friends squabble about a lost legacy. 

This isn't a new trait for the human 
race. The Romans loved watching 
people torn limb from limb at the 
Colosseum. It's almost natural for us 
to want to see people fail. 

The problem £omes when we as a 
society become obsessed with it, when 
we start to ignore the real problems of 
the world. There are real dangers in 
the world out there, real situations we 
have to face every day. 

So go ahead and slow down and 
look at the accident Don't forget 
though, the car behind you can snap 
you back into reality very quickly If 
you're not carehil 



Hm SptMW li a itnlw in tntd and i«stawnnt 
nuttagtmcnt PIhm ttnd cMimMm to «pMoma) 



Monday, Feb. 26, 2007 



KANSAS STATl COLLEGIAN 



Pages 



WORLD NEWS 




SUKIOG BOMBER STRIKES 
BAGHDAD COLLEGE 

BAGHDAD, Iraq - A nii- 
cide bomber tnggered a ball 
bearing-packed charge Sun- 
day, killing at least 41 people 
at a mostly Shiite college. The 
main gate was left littered with 
blood soaked student note- 
books and papers amid the 
bodies. 

Witnesses said a woman 
carried out the attack at the 
business-school annex to Mus- 
tansiriyah University, but Inte- 
rior Ministry officials said they 
were investigating the reports. 
Bombings at the school's main 
campus last month killed 70 
people. 

SENEGALESE VOTE 
FOR PRESIDENT 

DAKAR, Senegal - The 
president of one of Africa's 

moststabledemocraciessought 
another five-year tenn Sunday, 
jostling with 14 contenders in 
a race that may hinge on the 
votes of young people hungry 
for jobs. 

President Abdoulaye Wade 
has presided over an era of 
peace rar% in a tumultucAs 



part of the continent, and the 
economy - though struggling 
by Western standards ~ is 
stronger than in many Afri- 
can nations. Still, thousands of 
desperate youth alreatfy have 
voted with their feet, risking 
their lives to slip iUegally into 
Europe by sea. 

PIRATES HUACK FOOD AID 
SHIP OFF SOMALI COAST 

NAIROBI, Kenya - Pirates 
hijacked a cargo ship deliver- 
ing U.N food aid to northeast 
em Somalia on Sunday It was 
at least the third time since 
2005 a vessel contracted to 
the United Nations has been 
hijacked oH the country's dan- 
gerous coast. 

The ship, MV Rozen, had 
just dropped oB more than 
1,800 tons of food aid in the 
semiautonomous region of 
Puntland when the pirates 
struck, said Stephanie Savari- 
aud, a spokeswoman for the 
U N's World Food Program. 

It was not immediately 
knovm if any of the 12 crew 
members aboard - sbc from 
Sri Lanka and six from Kenya 
- were injured in the attack. 



CLERIC CLAIMS HE WAS 
TORTURED BY AMERKAHS 

CAIRO, Egypt ~ An Egyp- 
tian cleric allegedly kidnapped 
off the streeU of Italy by CIA 
agents in 2003 claimed Sunday 
the Americans who abducted 
him "savagely" tortured him 
while deporting him to Egypt 
for interrogation. 

The allegations by Osama 
Hassan Mustafa Nasr. who 
also is known as Abu Omar, 
are likely to intensify criticism 
of the United States' rendition 
program Italy has indicted 
26 Americsms and five It^an 
g^nts accused of seizing the 
cleric in 2003. 

Nasr's case is the first crimi- 
nal trial connected to the ren- 
dition policy, in vt^ich U.S. 
agents secretly transferred ter- 
ror suspects for interrogation 
to third countries. Nasr was 
released on Feb 11 aAer four 
years in Egyptian custody. 

Nasr said he was innocent 
and wanted to return to Italy, 
where he was granted political 
asylum in 2001, four years af- 
ter entering illegally 

— IhtAssodilcdPitsi 



FROM THE ARCHIVES 



Presented by: 

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Business Administration 
and Students in Free 
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What's your BIG idea? 

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EntrepreneurshipWeek USA 

Feb.24-March 3,2007 

www.cba.k-state.edu 



Student from the 1920s writes 
about racial equality of the time 



By F. Marshall Dwit 

Edilor's note: The KStaie 
Collegian pubUsfied this col- 
umn on March 22, 1927. This 
piece by Prank Marshall Davis 
is the fifth in a series published 
this month to honor Davis' 
memory. 

When Dams came to K-State 
in 1924, he urns one of only 26 
black students enrolled. He 
wrote a weekly column called 
"A Diplomat in BUick" in which 
he discussed politics, history 
and campus life with ftumor 
and candor 

We ask readers to ertjoy this 
piece of history. 

This morning, while get- 
ting ready to make my eight 
o'clock class in American Lit, I 
picked up an old copy of Crisis 
mi^azine in which was an 
nounced the winning poem in 
the annual poetry cont^t Thb 
particular work had heretofore 
escaped my notice. I read and 
thought of other black poets of 
both before and after the Civil 
war Phyllis Wheatly wrote stuff 
that was considered to be the 
b^ in her time. Paul Laurence 
Dunbar wrote stuff that caused 
the ^at )ohn Drinkwater to 
say he was the best writer the 
South ever produced. 



This brings to mind quite 
a few things which I don't 
understand: if these two were 
of the best, why aren't they 
mentioned in my textbook out 
of which I am supposed to 
study the writings of the best 
American authors? Maybe I 
dont understand that it, too, 
draws a color line; maybe a 
printer was in a hurry and 
overiooked the writers' work; 
or maybe the author could not 
spell their names. 

1 wonder why the girl who 
asked me questions the whole 
period during my botany quiz, 
and the boy who borrowed a 
pencU from me in both of the 
last sessions of our class in eco- 
nomics, failed to see me when 
we passed on campus today. 
Both are members of the frats 
and sororities. 

Perhaps some of my profs 
are not yet acquainted with the 
26 letters of the alphabet. At 
the beginning of the semester 
one of my instructor an- 
noimccd his intention of seat- 
ing the class alphabetically for 
the purpose of taking the roll 
with greater ease My last name 
begins with 'D" but I was not 
seated until after the "Ws." 

Not that there was any 
especial viriue in sitting be- 
tween two white students. But 
a brown face in a sea of white 



faces is always conspicuous, 
and it is quite embarrassing to 
take one's seat to the music of 
suppressed giggles of another 
race. 

There is a basketball game 
tonight, and I shall surely go 
But some of my colored college 
group will not go. Why pay, 
they say, $5 each semester to 
see games played in which 
Negro lads are barred from 
competing? We have Jnen ca- 
pable of playing upon some of 
the athletic teams if they were 
only given a chance 

But Ihou^ these thin{^ 
wei^ heavily on my mind, I 
still have much over which to 
rejoice and be happy. In winter. 
gray Kansas hills are covered 
with snow, a few evergreens, 
and they are beautiful; in the 
spring they are covered with 
grass that fits like a green dress, 
and this is also beautiful. I wear 
a jeweled fraternity pin, and 
my organization ranks second 
or third in scholars among all 
social fraternities of the college. 

If I were to change this 
brown skin for one tinted in 
light pink, I would gain nothing 
but a few conveniences. But 
tlie pioneers, makers of these 
United States, forsook ease and 
convenience and went into life 
rough-and-tumble and made 
history. 



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Page 6 



K-State 

prevails 

after poor 

shooting 



ly Jonathan Gafttn 

KANSAS SmiiCOLllGIAN 



With only Iwo games remaining in 
Big 12 Conference play, K-Slate con- 
tinues to add to the list of reasons it 
deserves an NCAA Tournament bid 

■nie Wildcats (20-9, 9 5 Big 12 
Conference) beat Colorado (6-18, 2- 
12 Big 12) 87-71 Saturday at the Co- 
ors Events Center, giving the men's 
basketball team 20 wins for the first 
time since 1998. The win also se- 
cured the team a winning conference 
record for the first time since 1988 

However, the Wildcats needed a 
second-half surge to ensure the win 
after trailing 30-29 at halftime The 
Buffs shot better than 60 percent 
from the field in the first half, while 
K-State struggled to find good looks, 
converting on less than 35 percent of 
it5 attempt. 

In the second half, the tables 
turned as the Wildcats began knock- 
ing down shots and Colorado went 
cold. The second-half shooting per- 
centages nearly flipped, as the Wild- 
cats made more than 66 percent of 
their shots and the Buffs shot less 
than 40 percent. 

K-State's 58 secondhalf points 
were a season high The Wildcats 
used a 13-0 run in the second period 
to break a tie and pull away from 
Colorado. 

During K-State's 78-59 victory 
against the Buffs Feb 10, the Wild- 
cats held Colorado's leading scorer, 
junior Richard Roby. to five points 
on l-of-9 shooting. However, this 
time K*State could not contain Roby, 
who led all players with 26 points on 
8-oM7 shooting. 

Colorado freshman Xavier Silas 
finished in double figures, scoring 17 
He also turned the bait over only one 
time, which was much better than the 
10 giveaways he had the last time he 
played K-State. 

Junior David Hoskins led the 
Wildcats in both points and rebounds 
with 21 and five, respectively. In the 
second half, he excited the K-State 
bench by pump-faking a shot on the 
perimeter, driving the lane and fin- 
ishing the play with a one-handed 
dunk. 

Senior Cartier Martin had 19 
points, nine of which he scored from 
the free-throw line. Junior Clent 
Stewart and senior Btakc Young had 
16 and IJ, respectively. 

The win gave K-State its first sea- 
son sweep against the Buffs since 
1992 The Wildcats also have swept 
Iowa State and Missouri this year. 

With the Big 12 Conference 
Championship tournament about 
three weeks away, KSlate is sitting in 
fourth place in conference standings. 
The Wildcats never have finished bet- 
ter than seventh since the formation 
of the Big 12 in 1996. 

K-State could be vying for a 
NCAA Tbumament berth with Big 
12 foe "ftxas Tech (18 11. 77), which 
is ranked one spot behind the Wild- 
cats in fifth place The Red Raiders, 
who own three victories over top-10 
teams, defeated K-State, 62-52, [an. 8 
at Bramlage Coliseum 




SPORTS 

KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

Bright future 

Beasley s destiny looks to include K-State success, NBA 




AUSTIN 
MEEK 



Michael Beasley is a sharp guy. 
It's tou^ to catch him off guard, 
whether you're asking a question 
or driving to the 
basket 

Beasley was 
nearly flawless in 
his first appear- 
ance at Bramlage 
Coliseum, scor- 
ing 30 points and 
leading Notre 
Dame Prep to 
a 107-80 vic- 
tory over IMG 

Academy in Sunday's All-American 
Shootout. 

The top-rated recruit was equally 
impressive off the court. He said the 
right things ("Tbday was just another 
game"). He made witty, off-the-cuff 
comments ("You could put me in a 
room with 50 midgets, and I'm just 
going to blend in with the crowd"). 
He exuded the charisma that sepa- 
rates good players from superstars. 
There was only one slip, hardly 
noticeable to the casual observer It 
came when a reporter asked Beasley 
what he plarmed to study at K-State. 

The question was followed by 
four solid seconds of dead air. 

He recovered quickly, saying he 
planned to major in business man- 
agement 

"If I'm not the great basketball 
player everyone is hyping me up to 
be, I've got to make some money 
somewhere," he joked 

After watching him play, it be- 
came clear the only business Beasley 
will be managing involves the zeroes 
on his NBA contract. 

Beasley said he plans to stay in 
school for four years, and maybe he 
will Still, K-State fans would be wise 
to enjoy the show while they can 

"If he's not ready, we're not going 
to push him, but no one's going to 
be a fool and turn down millions 
of dollars," said Beasley's mother, 
Fatima Smith. 

This certainly suggests Beasley 
would be NBA-bound if not for a 
league rule prohibiting players from 



CtiriftoptiM Han«wlndi«< | COLLEGIAN 
K-Stata tigriM Mkhaal Baailay puts up a shot ovec an IMG Academy defender 
Sunday at Bramlage Coliseum Beasley was named the game's most valuable 
player with 30 points and 1 7 rebounds. 



going pro straight out of high school 

Texas Tfech coach Bob Knight 
blasted the rule a week ago. 

He said the rule was 'the worst 
thing to happen tu college basketball 
since I've been coaching ' 

"Now you can have a kid come 
to school for a year and play bas- 
ketball, and he doesn't have to go to 
class." 

The rule isn't going anywhere. 



And for at least a year, neither is 
Beasley. 

"Can you ima^nc next year, with 
Bill (Walker) and Michael coming 
in'-"" Smith said. "Oh, we're going to 
have a good time There's more to 
come" 



Austin Meek it a Mnwr in jourrMlisrn. Pleait 



Sweat posts career high in Iowa State loss 



FILE PHOIQ 



ByJ«ulH*nMndiK 

KANSAS StATtCOlLEQAN 



It doesn't get much closer 
The Wildcats managed to hold 
Iowa State at bay for much of the 
game Saturday at Bramlage Coli- 
seum, but a 3-pointer from senior 
Megan Ronhovde gave the Cyclones 
their first lead with 28 seconds to go, 
and they held on for a 64-61 victory. 
K-State (16-12, 4-11 Big 12 Con- 
ference) led by six with 310 remain- 
ing in the second, but Iowa State (21- 
7, 9-6 Big 12) went on an 1 1-2 run to 
close the half. The Widcats were down 
by one with 28 seconds on the clock 
when senior Claire Coggins lobbed a 
pass across the lane straight into the 
hands of Iowa State sophomore Toc- 
cara Ross, who handed the ball off to 
senior Lyndsey Medders Sophomore 
Shalee Lehning fouled Medders, earn- 
ing her fifth foul of the game 

Medders sank both tree throws In 
the final seconds, Coggir\s attempted 
a shot from behind the arc to push the 
game into overtime but missed. 

"Iowa State stepped up and made 
the big plays," said coach Deb Pat- 
terson. "We had either a breakdown 
on the offensive or defensive end of 
the floor that they capitalized on, and 
quite frankly, down the stretch in a 
close game, whether you're home or 
on the road, in this league, that's what 
I think separate you." 

Patterson said despite K-State's 
struggles in the end, she was pleased 
with the team's performance defen- 
sively, especially the start of the second 
half, when K-State held the Cyclones 
scoreless for a 7-minute stretch. 

"But, when the game was on the 
line, to give that open three look 
- that was the play that breaks your 
back," she said. 

Medders led Iowa State with 16 
points and seven assists, and Ron- 
hovde, the only other Cyclone to 
reach double figures, had 12, 




' Lyndsey's a great point guard - 
she's the best in the Big 12," Lehning 
said. "She definitely came out and 
made (he plays when she needed to, 
and that's something that's a sign of a 
great point guard " 

Lehning finished just three assists 
shy of recording her second triple 
double with IS points, 11 rebounds 
and seven assists. 

junior Shana Wheeler finished 
with 10 points and nine rebounds, 
and freshman Ashley Sweat scored 
a game and career high of 25 points, 
including connecting on 4-of-4 from 
3 -point range. 

Next, K-SUte will face Oklahonia 
State at 6 p.m Wednesday at Bram- 
lage. 




Laft: Ashlsy 
SwMt 

stumbles past 

Iowa State 
defenders on 
her way to two 
of her career- 
high ? 5 points 
Saturday. 
The Cyclones 
outlasted the 
Wildcats Mith 
a 64-61 come- 
from-behind 
victory, 

Balow, S ha let 
L«hning 
covers her 

f Ke after 
fouling out 
of Saturday's 

game. 

Photoi by 

Chrtttophar 

HaiMwIncMI 

(OlLfCilAN 



Monday, Feb. 26, 2007 

1-MINUTE 
DRILL 

Staff Reports 

RUN|K-Statiwins3events 
at Big 12 Championships 

Senior Moigin Bonds tni sophomore 
Tevirt Ewr»tt ran the sarne distance 
during th« Big 12 Indoor Track and Field 
Champlonihlpt, «nd both ended up at the 
same spot: the first-place podium. 

Bondi won the women's 600-yard run 
with a time of 1 :20 OS, a K-Stale record for 
an oversized track. II was her setorvd Big 12 
Conference title in the event. 

Bonds provisionally qualified for the 
HiKA Indoor Championships in the SOO- 
meter run with a time of 2:06.20 in the 
Iowa State Classic earlier this year, 

Everett's winning time of 1:08 56 in the 
600-yird run broke a 1 0-year-old Big 12 
rKord. The previous record was 1:08.71 by 
Oklahorru's Ryan Kite. This was Everett's 
first Big 1 2 indoor title 

Sophonwre Loren Groves won the weight 
throw with a toss of 67-10 J/4. It was her 
third-best throw of the 2007 indoor season. 

In the same event, sophomore Lati 
Heller placed third with a throw of 6}- 7 
1/2. It was her setorvd best throw of the 
season. 

Other standouts were sophomore Scott 
Sellers and junior Marianne Schlachter. 

Sellers placed second in the men's high 
jump wilh a clearance of 7-S 1/4. He will 
jump in the NCAA championship nwet. 

Schakhter placed third In the women's 
triple jump with a jump of 43-i. It was the 
third-best jump in school history. 



BBC I Wildcat baseball goes 
4-0 over weekend 

Before the weekend started, K-Sute 
baseball coach Srad Hill said he was not 
satisfied when his team went to Shreveport 
^^^^^^ U,Feb16 18and 
^^^^^^H onlyvronthreeoffour 
^^^^^^^H games. 
f^^j^l After the Wildcats 
Kl -"^^B won all four of their 
BL' "Im games last wediend, 
^r^^^^H Hill shouldn't have 
^V ^M much to complain 

^^^^^^^1 about. 
^^^^^^^^ Ihey started off 
Hutt with a 4-2 win Friday 

agairvst Seton Hall at 
the Yankee Player Development Complex, In 
Tampa, Fla. 

Junior pitcher Brad Hutt gave up six hits 
and tvro runs over seven innings of work. 
Sophomore 8)611 Wiley went I -for-3 with 
an RBI. 

The Wildcats played a doubleheader with 
Ohio Slate on Saturday. K State swept ttie 
two games by a combined score of 10 6. 

Ute Wildcats won the first game 5-4 with 
freshman l.J. Muse getting his first college 
hn 

The hit came in the eighth inning when 
the Wildcats were down 4-1. It scored 
sophilmofe Drew Biery, who went 2 -for- J. 
Muse scored later that inning on a double by 
junior Brett Scott to take the tead for good. 
The second game ended 5-2 with K-State 
separating rtsetf in the seventh with four 
hits. Senior Ell Rumler hit a double in that 
inning to score two. 

The last game of the weekend was an 11- 
4 blowout over James Madrson The Wildcats 
had 16 hits. Wiley smacked two home runs 
and had three RBI. 

The Wildcats are 7 - ) and have three inore 
games on their 1 1 gatDe road swing to 
begin the year. 




GIF I Wildcats look to bounce 
bad at Fresno State 

After a tough first tournament, the K- 
State women's golf team will look to bounce 
back at the Fresno State Invitational, teeing 
off at 9:50 a.m. today in Fresno, talit. 

The field is fat from average with five 
teams ranked in the Top SO and 1 4 in the 
Top 10O, according the Gotfweek/Sagartn 
women's team rarvkings. Opponenis include 
No 12 Derwer and Big 12 Conference 
opponent No. 66 Colorado. 

The Wildcats will look to the play of 
freshman Abhi Sonne r, who finished tied for 
second at the Baja Classic earlier this month 
aflershooting?674— 1S0(+6l,cla)ming 
her second collegiate Top-10 finish 

The Wildcats have had a stmng lop-20 
presence, with at least one Wildcat in the 
Top 20 in the last 10 tournaments and will 
look to continue their streak at Fresno State. 



WEQ I Equestrian team splits 
matates with Baylor, A&M 

The K-Stste women's equestrian team 
split its weekend matches with Baylor and 
Texas A&M. 

The Wildcats defeated Baylor for the 
flrst time this season, 1 1B, in Tie first of 
two varsity shows for the Wildcats this 
weekend. 

K-State faced the Bears twice In the fall 
season falling both times. The first was 
an S-7 loss at the Bulldog Invitational In 
Athens, Ga., on Sept. 24 and the second a 
12-S loss at (ox Creek Stables in Manhattan 
on Oct. 1 J. 

K-State dropped its head-to head iTutch 
to Texas A&M, 14-8. Sunday In the Anal 
show ol the weekend. 



ARTS I ENTIRTAINMENT | SEX | FOOD | YOUR LIFE 

THE EDGE 



Monday. Feb. 26, 200> 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page? 



BEST PICTURE 

'The Departed" tame .way with the 
Af .irtenw'i (up hnnof Ihls year, beating out 
compe tiiofs 'Bab(=i:netter5 from two Jima," 
"Little Mm Sunshine' aitd "The Queen" 



ncPAirrcfi 



dlJfk- 




Iqi'iin J^I 


^^^^^^^T '""' -* 

-...,..- ^ 




■^■^■^1 




In the Oscar spotlight 

KMSU STATE COllUtAN 

The Stan shone brightly st the 79th Annual Academy Awards Sunday night. Hundreds of actort. directora 
and industry elite came out for the biggest night in Hollywood. 

Host Ellen Oegeneres made the evening fun and lighthearted, staying clear of political or insulting humor. 

Jack Black, John C, ReiUy and Will Ferrell performed a satirical musical number in which they pretended 
to be angry about how comediaits get no respect from the Academy. No one movie took home all the awards 
and there were only a few upseU, as when Alan Arkin took home the Best Supporting Actor award instead of 
favorite Eddie Murphy. 

All in all, though, Degeneret led a jovial, (eel-good awards show. 



KST 

SUPPORTIHG 

KTOR" 



BEST 
ACTOR 



BEST 

DIREHOR 



BEST 
AORESS 






Alan 



Forest 
Whttak*r 

•MUiUWGWXOTUm' 



•taitifi 
Scortese 

^f(E OfMRTED" 




BEST 

^WPPORT/NG 
ACTRESS 



Mirren 







jaddt 
Urta Haley 



Leonardo 
OlCaprlo 

-BlOODOtAMOW 



Clint 
Eastwmod 

ifnifiSfftoMiwodt**' 






Dilmon 
Houo»«« 

■BlOOOWAMOft'' 



Ryan 
Gosling 

■MAKtltlSOH' 



Stephen 
Freort 

HHEOUEEr 




Hudjoti 

'MMMCiRis- 



Judi 
Oench 

■NOlaOKASanoAf 






Cete 
8'*ncheit 



Paul 
Greengrass 

■UNirE[)93' 




•'"fm WEARS P,A„. ^^^*» 

(^^---__ IffTlf M(SS S(,N5«,^f . 



Maffc 
WahltM^g 



Will 
Smith 

HAmNEiS" 



Alejandro 

Gonizalei 

IMrrHu 




Katt 
Mnnstet 

'Umf(M(lWlEN- 




"Category winners 
are at th« top, 
with their fefiow 
nominees below 
them 



RED CARPET FASHION I The stars who shined, burned out 



J y \ 



Reese WldMnpoen 

ihone the brightest 
in } purple Nina Rkci 
frock showing off her 
slim ham* and sleek 
look with straight 
blond locks and simple 
nulieupi 



'J . ' ■ 


WORM 


WOfiST 




KIrsten Dunst may 


Anne Hathaway didn't 


Afthougb Penelep* 


Cameron Diaz came in 


hive needed to consuh 


use her " Of VI 1 Wears 


Cfui had the right idea. 


thiRt m a white Valentirw 


idiuillt stylist when 


Pr«la'fashion sense in 


her frilly Versace gown 


gown, including a hint of 


ihtdenned a spaitfy, 


herchoke of an off-white 


Just missed the mark, 


coiofwilhgteeneamn^. 


»Nthe7lightbh)e9own. 


Valentino gown with i 


prewniingtoomuchofa 






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good thing. 






upper half of the dresi. 







JesskiSlel stood out 
with a hot pink Oscar 
de la fienta A line gown 
with a backless desic 




STILLER 



(ompiledbTEyMnlMi 



CELEB NEWS 

Stiller named Hasty 
Pudding Man of the Year 

CAMBRIDCt, Mass. — Ben Stiller had to 
put on pinli shoes, a blond wig and slim 
headband and strut against an Owen Wilsori 
impersonator before 
daibnlng Harvard s 
HntyPuddliigUanof 
the Year award. 

'Just tike at home, 
honey,' Sti Iter said 
to his wife, actress 
Christine Taylor, on 
Friday as he put on 
the female attire. 

The event was 
organUed by the 

Hasty Pudding Theatncals, the nation's oldest 
undergraduate drama tntupe. 

Stilief, 41, played along with the good -na 
tured traditional Hasty Pudding roast, which 
lampooned his career. He won the award 
decades after dropping out of him sdwol at 
the University of California, Los Angeles. 

'for somebody wtio never could have 
ever got close to getting into Kanard, (think 
that this was even better, so I thank you very 
nnuch" Stiller said. 

The awards are given to performers 
who havemadea'lastingandimpressive 
Cimtlibution to the worfd of entertainment,* 
Kcording to the drama troupe. 

'Ben Stiller has really pioneered in many 
ways, news forms of coniedy,' Joshua 
Lachter, the press and publicity manager for 
the Hasty Pudding Theatricals, said in a tele ■ 
phone intenriew with The Associated Press. 

Scarlett Johansson received the Hasty 
Pudding Woman of the Year award last wee*. 
Ust year's honorees were Halie Beny and 
Richard Gere. 

— The AssodXed Press 



Amerkanfdol contestant 
photos surface 

m ANG£LfS — The Internet was abuu 
Friday over a series of racy photos linked to 
an'Anwrican Idol' contestant 

The pictures, posted on several Web 
sites, included one with four women posing 
topless aj the beach, their hands covering 
their breasts, and others with a woman 
engaged in a sex act. 

The anonymous postings alleged that 
Antonella Barba, 20, of Point Pleasant, HJ., 
was depicted in the photos and did not 
indicate how they were obtained. 

Alex Gillespie, a Fox publicist in New York 
for the top-rated show, said the network 
would have no comment on the incident or 
whether it might affect Barba's participation 
in the contest. 

This week, Barba survived the first round 
of viewer voting and was scheduled to 
compete again next week. 

Nigel Lythgoe, an "American Idol' 
producer, was quoted on Entertainment 
Weekly's Web site on Friday as saying he was 
unaware of the photographs. 

'We have really good background checks 
on everybody, and we deal with that every 
season,' he told EW.com. "It's sad, isn i it, 
that your best friends are the ones that 
come forward with infomiation that will go 
to Smoking Gun or put your photographs on 
ttwWebr 

In the past, 'American Idol" has dropped 
contestants for actions unrelated to the 
show. Frenchie Davis was disgualihed in 
200} because of her appearance on an adult 
Web site, but she bounced back with a role 
in the Broadway production of "Rent." 

— The Auodattd Presi 



WEEKEND 
BOX OFFICE 

■ The weekend totals listed are measured in 
mHtkms of dollars 

Top movies 

1. "Ghoft Rider' 

Sony 

2. "The Number 2J" 1S.1 
New Line Cinema 

3. "Bridge tnTerebithia' ]U 
SuenaVbta 

4. "Reno 911!: Miami' 10.4 
Fat 




S. "Hoitr 5.7 

Paramount Pictures 

t. 'Music uidLyiki' M 

WametBros 

7. "Breach' 6.2 

Universal 

I. lyicrfcfTyVMdy^LltHtCMi'S.) 
IMmgate 

9. 'The Astronaut farmei' «.S 

Warner Brothers 

10.'Aflwii>g(kace' 4.} 

Samuel Gotdwyn Films 

— mwm.b<u»tfktmefe,«>m 



Pages 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, Feb. 26, 2007 



Right: Blak* Willtami, cowboy from Northaaitf m 

Oklahomi A&M Coll«ga, watu lr> a group of horses 

for ifte team roping competition Satuniay evening. Rain 

forced cotnpetitori to move their horses inside. 

Below: Mike Murphy, Oklahoma Panhandla State 

Univertity ftudent^ a^luits hit belt while putting on 

his chaps Sunday afternoon. 




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Oirtnopbw Hanewlncfcal | COLLEGIAN 



SADDLE 'EM UP, 

Thousands come to watch 15 teams compete 




Catilna Rawton ((OLLtGIAM 
Lance Heaien and Jamai Hajak of Northwait Oklahoma State University ride their horses to their trailers Friday afternoon during the opening day of the K-State College Rodeo Competitors from 1 5 different 
colleges participated in the weekend events. 



Amy Wfllf ort, of Colby 
(Kan.t Community 
Collage, claanf her 

horse, Sammie, Friday 

afternoon twfore the 

evening's events. 




Chriftophar Hmewlnckal t (OlLEGtllN 



Monday, Feb. 26, 2007 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 9 




Tratkrs tr* tMriwd 

in the field in the 
nofthvw5t comer 
of the intersec- 
tion at Kimball and 
Denlson avenu«i 
Saturday nnorning, 
Competitofs 
traveled from all 
across the Midwest 
to compete in the 
tod«o. 

ChrlttophM 
Har««wirKlMl 



TIE 'EM DOWN 

in 9 events at the 51 st annual K-State College Rodeo 





Cstrina RnviMi | (OllEGfAN 




SUvan Doll , (OliEGIIkN 

Top: Balky Blackburn, Fort Scott Kan., Communtty 
CoMtga ftudtnt, attempts to lasso a calf Friday night in the 
breai^away roping competition. Breakaway roping is one of 
nine events that were part of the K-State College Rodeo. 

Abova: DJ. Shlald of CoffoyvMI* (Kan.) Community 
Collage straps spurs onto his boots before the start of the 

bull fiding event Friday night. 

Loft: Jamos Carter, Fort Scott (Kan.) Community College 
cowboy, compotes during the barebacic competition 
Friday evening. Carter was one of eight competitors in the 
bareback competition Friday 



Ctwtstepher NwMwIiKhel |(01UGI«N 
1 



. *,*^H*Vt* *^^S^' ' ^ jr ,#* Ji/ f J^K ^iA ^m ii m m t0 m ^ 



,* v*>v^w\*t'*-^*^ * ♦ «,■• 



Page 10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, Feb. 26, 2007 



Manhattan Arts Center displays specially processed photography 



By Srit Handgraaf 

KANSAS STATE COL LEQIl^N 

Digital photography has 
made it rare for people to 
hand -process photographs, 
but David Bartlett still does it 
the old-fashioned way. 

The Manhattan Arts Cen- 
ter featured Bartlett 'a images 
Friday night when an exhibi- 
tion of his work opened to 
the public. The display also 
featured work from residents 
of Meadowlark Hills Retire- 
ment Community. 

"It was a wonderful open- 
ing," said Tess Purvis, director 
of marketing and programs 
for the arts center. "It was 
well -attended, and we were 
very pleased to have the 
Meadowlark artisU. We very 
much enjoy featuring local 
artists" 

Bartlett, an art professor 
at Morehead Stale Univer- 
sity in Morehead, Ky,, said 
he has been working on his 
photographs for 13 years us- 
ing a technique called photo- 
gravure, a process that gives 
photos a more artistic and 
painted look. 

"I had a brief exposure to 
photogravure when I was a 
graduate student and actually 
made a few plates but did not 



really achieve any mastery of 
the process at that time" he 
said. "After many years work- 
, ing with traditional, large- 
format black and white pho- 
tography, 1 decided to tackle 
photogravure again, partly to 
broaden my artistic horizons 
and partly just for the chal- 
lenge of it. 

"In very general terms, it 
is s combination of photog- 
raphy and intaglio printmak- 
ing," he said. "The linal prod- 
uct is a print in the traditional 
sense ~ an image consisting 
of ink on fine paper made by 
passing the paper through an 
intaglio press in contact with 
an etched and inked copper 
plate" 

Intaglio printmaking is a 
process through which a de- 
sign or image is incised onto a 
plate to which ink is applied. 
The plate is used (o make an 
image on a smooth surface, 
often paper 

The final product of pho- 
togravures is a sepia-colored 
image with subtle lines and 
hues. Many of the images still 
retain details of the original 
print. 

"It still amazes me," 
Bartlett said. "It helps that 
the original images for most 
of them were made with a 



large- form at camera, which 
produces negatives that are 
eight by 10 inches. A negative 
that large has a lot of detail. 
Nevertheless, it is impressive 
that so much of it is retained 
throughout the process." 

Bartlett said much of his 
work focuses on American 
landscapes 

"Many of these images 
were shot in northern parts of 
the country, to which 1 have 
been greatly attracted since 
my childhood in Wisconsin," 
Bartlett said. "1 have made 
quite a few extended trips 
expressly for the purpose of 
photographing." 

Dorothy Currence, anoth- 
er artist featured in the exhib- 
it, said she admired Bartlett's 
work 

"What I really like the 
most, I think, are these scen- 
ery ones," Currence, Manhat- 
tan resident, said "They re- 
alty look more like paintings 
than photographs. It's almost 
unbelievable. He really is a 
marvel." 

The free exhibit, "Photo- 
gravures," will be on display 
to the public until April 7. The 
arts center, 1520 Poyntz Ave., 
is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Monday through Friday and 
from 1 to 4 p.m Saturday. 




Above: AnatyzJng photo- 
gravur* works by David 
Bartlett Jo* Souther, Mapit ' 
Hill rMldant and his ton 
Kalcb, age 9, and friend Isaac 
Houitgn, age B, peruse the 
gallery before going out to take 
their own photographs. 

Left: Bartktf t photogra- 
vure pieces line the walls of 
Manhattar\ Arts Center. They are 
a combination of photography 
and intaglio prlntmakirK). 



FTfrGot 2L^-X} 

m 

Call 532-6556 or e-mail: U collegian@spub.ksu.edu t 




feorStorvDta 






UMMERTIME...SIT DOWN 
OR STAND OUT? 

'looking for summer employmtnt^Frnd on! how f/ie benefiti of working con 
Mp yoti ftand out to future etnploytn. 

Derby Academic Resource Center '"''i"**** 



Monday, February 26 

7p.m 



Now Leasing for 



Fall 2007 

Chedc out our model showing nowl 
Whh 900 apartmente In the Manhattan area 



Gutding You frotn College to Career 



4 



we can find a place for youl 



BEDFtOOMS 



www.k-state.edu/ces 




Campus 
Phone Book 



Only Phone Book with Sludents' Cell Phone Numbers 
Coupons with the Crealesl Deals 
' A Menu Guide wilh local restaurants' menus 



PidtoYHniiKcrfiie!03 



1119 Laramie «5 
Mon.Wed.Ttun 5:30-7:00 
m 4«0-7:00 

Sun S«0-7:00 

1722 Laramte tg 
Mon 10«0-I2«0 
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Wed 12K>0-1:00 
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Mon.WM.Fri 2:00-4 M 

tUH. TiMJn 4;go-6:00 

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Campaign for 

Be healthy. Be sensible. Be YOU! 
Meet >«*«*)[ / Zm<i wM - one of the brave Dovf 'Real Women' who stood proudly 
with ftv* other women in her urxlafweir m pert ol the Dove CwTHJatgn tor Baal Beauty, 



Stacy wi #iafB her wpenerice as a Otw rTw« «d «»«» yoii to W on« Mxiut yous^ 

)Cu wai(^ cr boh Iha Step the dieiR aril) re«w «ilkq hdrisl tTH Irrw to M tMsutlM ri you own ^^ 

When: Tuesday February 27, 2007 

Time: 7:00 - 8:00 p.m. 

Where: K- State Student Union 

Main Ballroom (Second Roor) 





785.776.3804 

indlproperUes.coin 

Saturday Office Hours: 10am-2ptn 

MCCUlLOLJCHnFVFIOPMFr^l 




ALSO UISING FOR THE tW-nm ACAtJEMIC 



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Now Offering FREE TANNING! 



■ Monday, Feb. 26, 2007 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 1 1 



CANDIDATES | Most funds go to shirts, signs 



Continued from Page 1 

Candidates are required to file 
reports listing all donon to 
their campaigns. 

Wagner and Peele have 

raised tKe most money with 

$3;203.75. Wagner said 

he expected there to be a 

significant sum left over after 

the elections, and he and 

Peele plan to donate it lo a 

foundation tchularship. 

^ Mosimann and Piper 

l^ceived $2,805 in total 

;31osimann's parents donated 

:^52.16. just enough to bring 

3ie pair up to the limit on 

donations not from students 

^ "We weren't going to 

^sk them for contributions, 

^ul they feally wanted to," 

Musimann said. 

Candidates for student body 
president and vice president 
are allowed to use as much as 
$»00 from their own money 
and outside contributors The 
rest must come from K-State 
students who can vote in the 
election Candidates may 
accept as much as $20 from 



Expenses by candidates for student body president 
and vice president 



Hiibufn-F«tky» 


None 




NMt 


Mnlmann-P(p«r 


S60J.S8 
250iig[tt 


$t,414.67 
«»stilrts 


$52 


OvM^tadi 


jtot^H 


P VsNrts ,^ 


iM?3i 



W»gner-Pt«tt 



«SliO 



;i,«24.83 



iM.60 



MISS RODEO I Position 
teaches time management skills 



* Signi [vptntnted In Ihii c(Kt-eiq>ense citefory m only tm-mounted slqns. 
" Hilbum and h^f'i fiiln^t included 40 shirts th«y aid lh«y planned to 
purcluit In tlw near future. 



each student. 

Nick Levendofsky, Student 
Governing Association 

elections commissioner 

and junior in agricultural 
communications and 

journalism, said Hilbum and 
Peeley and Ogan and Blush did 
nol file contribution reports 
because they received less than 
$800 He said Ogan and Blush 



will receive late contributions 
and will have to report them 
next week 

Blush said the pair is 
late because their T-shirts, 
which they will be giving to 
contributors for money, are 
not yet in. The pair will turn in 
a contribution report Friday. 

Hilbum and Peeley could 
nol be reached for this story. 



Continued from Page 1 

ride," Holland said "It's so 
much of the competition and 
so much of what it takes to 
do well c^ the road - 80 per- 
cent of the time people saw 
me as Miss Rodeo K- State 1 
was on horseback" 

Holland said Smith stood 
out in the competition 

"She did amazing," Hoi- 
land said. "She won every 
single category. I'm pioud 
of all the girls because they 
all have improved so much, 
but she just took this pageant 
and ran with it, " 

The pageant was not easy 
to win, Smith said. 

"I studied as hard as I 
would for a final in a class," 
Smith said "And 1 was riding 
everyday" 

As Miss Rodeo K State, 
Smith will travel and repre- 
sent the K State rodeo club. 
Holland said she has trav- 
eled to tnaniy rodeos, parades 
and even a cancer ride 



"I was on the road for 
three months out of the sum- 
mer," Holland said. "As Miss 
Rodeo K-State you have to 
want to be around people 
and be a public person." 

Smith said she is looking 
forward to traveling, 

"This will bring many 
brand new experiences to 
me," Sirtith said. 

Miss Rodeo K-State also 
b in charge of plaiming the 
next year's pageant. Holland 
said working on the pageant 
helped her gain marty skills 
she will use in the future. 

"It's definitely taught me 
patience and organization. 
It's all about time manage 
menl," she said. 

Holland said the best way 
for Smith to represent K- 
State as Miss K-State Rodeo 
is just to be friendly. 

"It's important that we're 
getting the spirit of rodeo out 
there and making it some- 
thing that is on people's 
minds,' she said. 



JAZZ I Group to take cultural classes; South American tour will fulfill course requirements 



Continued from Page 1 

Excited about the opportunity 
: to learn about other cuKuies 
'. and muMc genres. 

"Most of th^e cultures ac- 
■ tually have had a very drastic 
; impact on American jazz in the 
: last 50 years," said Matt Leifer, 
.3ru miner for the group and ju- 
nior in music. "It will be a good 
Opportunity to go and actually 
?ee it from the souit;e." 

To prepare for the trip, the 
five members will take two 
courses about the music and 
cultures of the South Amen- 
can countries. Coins will teach 
a course on South American 
music, and Bradley Shaw, as- 
sociate professor of modem 
languages, will teach language, 
politics and other aspects of 
South American societies. 



"It's not ortly an oppor- 
tunity to learn cool stuff that 
I'm interested in anyway, but 1 
also think it's a great opportu- 
nity provided by the university," 
Leifer said. "We will be able to 
present ourselves as well-in- 
formed citizens nol just stupid 
American tourists" 

Though Coins has traveled 
across the worid with various 
jazz groups, most of the mem- 
bers have not performed over- 
seas. Phil Ward, brass player 
and graduate student in mu- 
sic, said he played in Europe 
for three weeks, but the trip to 
South America will be a totally 
difierent experience for the 
whole group. 

Coins said he also received 
a large amount of support from 
several college administration 
members. 



"President Wefald has been 
our biggest supporter from day 
one," he said. 

The band will perform at 
several different venues in 
Manhattan and Kansas before 
the trip The members said they 
thought they were musically 
ready for the trip. 

"1 don't think I've ever had 
a group of students that play on 
the level that these students do 
and I felt confident enough to 
take out of the country," Coins 
said. 

Althot^ the group has 
been together since the begin- 
ning of last semester, they said 
they have all performed with 
each other over the past four or 
five years 

During this time period, 
Kelly McCarty, bass player and 
senior in applied music, said 



they have learned what to ex- 
pect from each other. 

"The four of us have played 
so much over the past three 
or four years that none of us 
necessarily have to lead on 
the bandstand just because we 
know what each other kind of 
wants," he said. 

Much of the group's pcrfor 
mances focus on the perform 
ers' ability to improvise, said 
Rick Smith, guitar player and 
senior in music education. 

"It's kind of a chance to 
show who I am and show what 
my influences are, based on 
what 1 play," he said. "But it's 
also very technically demand- 
ing." 

Leifer said they have prac- 
ticed enough to know their 
strengths and when members 
like to improvise solos. 



"It's hard to learn but it al- 
most makes your job easier in 
the long run," he said "There's 
always new stufl to learn about 
it, but in a certain sense, we can 
all just pick up our instruments 
and play right now." 

Smith said he could not pick 
a better group of performers. 

"This trip would awesome 
even if we were going with 
people we necessarily didn't 
like, but we are brothers here," 
he said. 

This is the last semester in 
the jazz program for most of 
the members of the group. 

Coins said the members 
will write an essay and discuss 
what they learned from the trip 
to fulfill course requirements. 
After that, some will remain in 
the program, and others will 
leave and find work elsewhere. 



RODEO I 

Many fill arena 

to support rodeo 

participants 

Continued from Page 1 

land had reigned as the K State 
rodeo queen since last year's ro- 
deo. 

The main event followed the 
crowning ceremony, with men 
splitting their pants after fall- 
ing off the bucking horses, and 
barrel-racing horses kicking up 
dirt. 

fri all, Daly said Saturday 
evening's rodeo went well 

McQuade, who was a nomi- 
nee for rodeo queen, said she 
was impressed by the number of 
people who came to tlie rodeo 

"There really weren't any 
open seats in the house," she 
said. "It was amazing.'' 

She said she was especially 
impressed with the number of 
students who attended 

"I hope every year we get 
that many more students com- 
ing," she said "Our rodeo is one 
of the largest rodeos around It's 
great to have the student body 
supporting us" 

During the three days, Doug 
Munsell and his son Wacey 
served as the rodeo entertain- 
ment and performed various 
humorous routines 

Shonda Wilson. K State 
alumna and former K-State 
Rodeo team member, said she 
comes back to offer support 
even though she now is an as- 
sistant coach at another college. 

After the events on Friday and 
Saturday, participants and the 
crowd were invited to a rodeo 
after party at RC McGraw's. 

The three-day event culmi- 
nated Sunday with the finals of 
several events, including broiic 
riding, steer wrestling and break- 
away raping. 

McKinstry said the overall 
rodeo went smoothly. 

"It was probably the best 
one we've had in the past few 
years." 





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Monday, Feb. 26, 2007 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 13 



II I I _L II II II ,, ,, 

L» :: L» 'J : 




■ I 1 1 I ■ • 



LET'S RENT 




1103 THURSTON. Of>« 
btook to cwrptA. Naw eon- 
Ont ind two- 
ifM^tmanli, 
tifl dryw, dlth- 
wutMH. Moony, privat* 
parking, Mcurity llghting 
Ha pets June 2007 laaw 
785-539-5508 or 

785-564-0857 

1l1t POVKrrZ. actou 
Ifotn ctty parti with oH- 
■trost partying Camrsl ilr, 
wsWiBF'' dryer fiteutral oo(- 
an wW total ra-ntodal. 
W«M( and lru^ paid 
Jur^e teaM. Ho pats 
785-313-4812 



1828 FAJRVIEW. Quiet 
one-twdfoom ($400) end 
Shidto (1375) (war KSU 
Laundry Water, Iraah 
paid (4o pats, no Bnctt- 
mg. 1 JUNE. 

530-442-1121 



1832 Ct^FUN ACfOss 
Irom Marian Had IWo- 
badnMMTi apartments 

Clean, quiet, private partt- 
ir>g. No BmoKlng. no pets 
tew. Auguat laaaa a . 
788-539-5508 or 

788-564-0857 



350 N 16t^ Two tXocks 
10 K -State and AgglevAa 
twro^sdrootn apanrrvants 
Clean, quiet, prtvate park- 
ing. Ho srriokinB. no pels 
1884. June and August 
leases 785-53a-5S08 or 
785-S84-0857 

JUME LEABE two.t>ad 
room apartment Walk lo 
campus. EiMltaOl condl- 
Vanl tocstkm. Wpjfttwti .- 
r an t ka I a ta .com 
785-410-2814 



PRE-LEASNa JUNE and 

Auguat. Some units brand 
new. dose to KSU, 
washer/ dryer included 
Call lor deiBllE 

786-7762102 youngwHk- 
t®yahoo.com, wwwwHk- 
taptscom 



TWO AND ttvaa-bed 
room Close to campua 
Central air, dishwasher, 
ooln operated laundry la- 
ality. AvaUabla June or 
Auguat No pels. 

7B5-537-1 749 or 

785-539-1545. 



200 N. nth On City Park 
Two large, sunny three- 
bedroom (S7S0) ljun*v 
Water, trash paid No 
peta. no amoking. l JUNE 
and 1 AUQUST 

530-142-1121 




1111 WHARTON Manor 
Road. four-t}eOfoom tower 
ievel dupiei with neutral 
cokMS. two tMttis. washer/ 
dryer (urriistied 817 Vat- 
ttar, three-bedroom tower 
level duplex with new car- 
pet, neutral cotors and 
washwr/ dryer hook-^jps. 
Very reaaonat>la rant with 
great apace in tsoth du- 
pleies June leaM No 
pots Call 785.313.4812 

NICE DUPI^X 608 Vat- 
tlaf Four-bedroom, two 

balh includes all appli- 
ances, was^sr/ dryer No 
pets Availatiie August l 
11080/ month 

785-293-5197. 



Pierre. 420 Ijramie 
nice lour-twdroom. 
bath Washer/ dryer, can- 
iraj air conditkining Large 
badrooma. 785-313-3876, 
7B5 31 J-5573 

AVAiaftii Mm t 

Three to lour-twr>room 
house 1541 HINcraal No 

smoiting. no pels $1035 
785-456-3021 

MUhLl JUkE 1.t 



NEW USTWM. avallabi* 
June 1 Four to 1tve-ti«eJ- 
room twusa k>c«l*d east 
ol AggievWa at 824 
T^ bath, 
diyaf. dish- 
washer, central tk. 
doposil ptui 
765-539-3672. 



^1^ Hllrf t6 



campus, one 

through six -bedroom 
houses, and apartmenls. 
Waaher/ dryer, cantrti air 
Available now 0) tall No 
pets TI5-S37-7O80, 

AUI-IEMflOMI — TB 

choose from Availat>(e 
Junaor Auguat 1SI $325, 
$330. $360, $370, and 
$390 785-712-7257 



FOUR BEDROOM 

tKHJSE CkM* lo oani- 
pus Laiga baelcytM. Can- 
tt^ air/ hieat. Na tmoWng 
or pels. Wiiad tor hot tub. 
August laaae. titOW 
month 1520 Hartford 
Road 785-759-3620 

FOUR-BEDROOM. ONE 
bath house lor rent. 900 
ValUar June lease 
Washer/ dryer, central air- 
condltkinkig Fenced back- 
yard, peta alkwed $1200/ 
month Party shack and 
garaga Included 

785-539-4949 

FOUR-BEDROOM, TWO 
and one-half bath, study 
August 1 $975 per 
month Knighl Real Es- 
lata. Call 785-539-5394 

FOUR-BEDROOM. 
JUNE. Juty. Augusi Al- 
llanca Profiarty Manage- 
rnani 785-539-4.357 www^- 
rtnlaerrLMMn 

ONE TO live-badKiom 
i«»«riinant* and houaaa. 
ClOi* to campus. 
785-539- 1S75 Or 

785-313-8292. 

ONE-BEDROOM TO llve- 



HOUSE SEVEN minutes 
from campus $200 00 per 
month Call 

913-981-S929 



SUBLEASER NEEDED 
■or Spring 2007 awrwster 
1315/ mon»i. Four-bed- 
room apartment. First 
rrtontti'a retYl paid, cheap 
utWUea. ei3-«9&-25S8 or 
9 1 3-408-1 034. 



THREE-BEDROOM 
APARTMENT two bkjcks 
to campus, dose to Ag- 
gievlHe. Rent $300/ per- 
Bor.Ca»78S-221.6»0, 



TWO-BEDROOM APART- 
MEt4T, walk lo Campus, 
$820/ month includes uHM 
786-278-1*09 leave 




Si'ivkc Ditrctory 



Three-bedroom, one btack TRREfTlbFlOOM MAIN bedrooms Apartments, 




tool KEARNEY Pour- 
Bedroom, also have 
Three, Five, Six and 
Seven -Bedroom ttouies. 
All JUNE 1 rentals. Pels 
OK 785-317-7713 

1838 CAMPUS Hoad 

Four-bedmom. two tiathi 
Central air. washer' dryer 
tumished Neutral colors 
with nice, new tialhB. 
Large badrooma (or an al- 
lordBble price June 
lease. Ho pets. 

785-313-4812 

18SS PLAIT, Four-bed- 
room. Central heal and 
air Washer/ dryer, 
garage June tst lease 
Mo pots Also have triree- 
bedroom availabls. 

78S-«t6-t74a. 



wesi of campus Washer, 
rlryer. and dlshwast>er in- 
eluded $870 per monlh 
Jim, 785-565- 1748 

AVAILABLE JUNE, lour- 
tiedroom, two bath 
houses. Waaher/ dryer, 
dishwasher, central air 
condltKjning 824 Fre- 
mont, 1022 Hurr^ldt. Jell 
786-313^876. Doug 
788-31 3-5873 

BEAUTIFUL REMOD- 
ELEDhORM* 1612 1614 
Pierre, lour- five-twdnxim, 
two bath, fresh carpet/ 
paint. Naw kitchen, bath, 
modem appliances Cloee 
to ctmpue. Move in June: 
August 788-304-0387 



houaa lout/ live- bedroom, 
two and one-halt baths, in- 
cKides appliances, 

washer/ dryer No pats 
AvBliabta Augusi 1 
785 293-5197 

nTTTTFITTOI 

HOUSE Walk to campus 
Two kitchens, tiraplacaa. 
central air. r>eutral cotors, 
washer/ dryer lumiahe<]. 
garage. lawn mainte- 
nance June lease No 
pets Can 785-3 13-48 12 

FOUR -BEDROOM, TWO 
bath, cioae lo campus 
Two living roon^s 
Washer/ dryer, central air. 
No pets June and August 
ieases 788-338-1124. 



noor. two-bedroom base 

rnent apartment Washer/ 

dryer in both. 

laaaaa. available 

1, 1211 ThureWv 

7ftS-«68-3471 <M after 

7p.m 

THREE-BEDROOM. 

TWO bksm duplei, two car 
garage, washer/ dryer, 
very well maintained 
Avaitabie June 1, t93<V 
montti. 621 MisskMi 
765-776-9260 

TWO AND three-bed- 
rooms TWO Macka (o cam- 

pua. June and August 
leases. No pels, laundry 
hook-ups, centrsl air 
$295/ bedipom. 

785-338-1124. 

■ I 

TWO-BEDROOM, 

CLOSE to campus Large 
bedrooms, avallab4e June 
(Irtt. $590 786-712-7187. 

TWO-BEDROOMS, CfiEi 
bath, attached garage. 
Central air, apptiances, 
washer/ drj/er No pels 
Augusi. $780 

765537-6420. 
785-341-5346, 

VERVNICEnva-badnxMYi, 
two bath Available June 
rtrat $1500 

786-712-7287. 



duplexes artd 
Most dose lo campus. 
Sotne farther sway June 
or August taaaaa. Cheek 
out our 
ameraldpropertymanag- 
ment.com or call Erf>erakl 
Property Managamant 
788-887-9000 lor mora In- 
lonnabon. 

RENTAL HOUSE $600 
One year lease Jur>e 
2007 10 May 2008 Excel- 
lent distance to walk to 
campus Call Mrs. Kim 
913-681-9959 

SEVEN TO elgtii-b«Jroom 
(two kitchen) June, July, 
Augusi. AlNanoe Property 
Managemenl. 
78S-S39-4357 www renl- 
9pm .com 

SIX-BEDROOM ^w5 
kflcrisn) June, Jufy. Au- 
guat Alliance Property 
Managamant. 
785-539-4367. »irw»(.farrt- 
apm.com 

SPACIOUS FOUR-BED- 
ROOM. hro bath 
Wastwr/ dryer, nice 
kitchen, ftosr City Parli. 
Available May t $1100/ 
month pkis utilities 
785-313-1886 

THREE, FOUR. FIVE. SIX 
PLUS BEDROOMS Look- 
ing loi that pertect tiorrw 
to rent? Great selection 
and prtces Capetone 
Management 
765-341 0666 



PWUvestoOt Sfnrim 



AKC ENGLISH MastHls- 
male and temales- 
brtndlas, apdcots and 
fawna. All ages 

785-539-0227 $600- 

$1000 




THE COLLEGIAN cannot 
verity me financial poten- 
tial ot edvartlsamanta Irt 
tf<a Emptoymertt/Carear 
ct«««lflcatk>n. Readers 
at* advtaad to approach 
any such buslneas oppor- 
tuittty wtth rea- 

sonable cau- 

lion. Tit* CoHaglan urgaa 
our readers to contact the 
Better Businee* Suraati, 
sot SE JaNereon. 
Topaka, KS 8«807-t180. 
(TW)232- 0484. 



Rent-Apt. Unfumt^ied Rent-Apt. Uijumt^Kd Rent-Apt Unftimisfied 



TWO-BEDROOM apart- 
ment. Newly renovated 
AvaiaM June 1. $600, 
two bkicks to campus and 
Agglevllle. Dishwaaher. 
central air, laundry lacilily 
443-687-7527 

TWO- BEDROOM SPE- 
CIAL at Park Piace Apart- 
rr>enta $495 rent plus tree 
cable through July '07. 
765-539-2951 

TWO-BEDROOMS. ALL 
billE pa kl 785-341-4498 

VERY NICE three-bed- 
room. Iwo bath apartment. 
Three bbcks to Aggieville 
822 Fremont Attonlable 
utlimas. August 1 . 
765-313-1807 



WHY RENT WHEN VOU 
CAN BUVT Condos lor 
sale. Two and three-bed- 
room itarting at $112,850. 
collaglalevllla.com 
785-537-2098 



WILDCAT VILLAGE Avail- 
aMe June or August lour- 
two balti, 
tfl dryer, slomi 
rxMm, $1400. Cable pahl. 
785-T76-Z4ZS or 

785-565-3760. w«vw.vi- 
lBge-renials.com 



TWO-BEDROOM, 
CLOSE to campua. Per- 
sonal wastwr' dryer. $645- 
$675/ month. 
785-34 1-449S 

TWO-BEDROOM, many 
sizes and prk:eb, June or 
August. 785-341-0686. 



NOW LEASING 



Pre- 1 ease 

Today for 

Spring! 

Only A few 
homes remain 

Amenities: 
■Washer/Dryeri or 

hookups available 
•On-Site Management 
•Garages Available 
•Private fitness Center 
•Storm Center 
•Peai:etul Garden 

Setting 
•Enormous Closets 



1420 

Bcechwood Terraci 

New Apartitiptil 
L<). 2 & 3 Bedrooms 
1" Baths 
Washer/Dryer 
Energy Efficient 

On i Wosdeil 

Stclutleil 2 Acre Let 

with Crack 



$710 & $885 
341-4021 



•»•"»» 



S,sc»ui^'' 

Fsw Spa cat Rtmsin tor 
•Greduttt Sludtntt 
• Upper CI I a 

Ainseiiiet 



4 ,. . 1^*0 

.-nag 
.-(wnaCkaM 

• ,-; ,4,;.Uil« 

• Mu4H PstirvGnie 

• SkniCnie 

■ ''>i*r««MiiBitlit»M>ai^ 
'.viiitnifCtltartiiiiairii^ 



WESrrHF.STf R PARK 
776-1118 



ly4B4|<|.t««lMlF>l| 



GEORGETOWN 

776-8080 



spacious 
Duplexes 

Custom built with the 
l^-State student 



Eick dupieii Itnurat wiMi-in 
ciDivlt. all krtchtd 
Bpplisncfs.wlbhBr/drvfir. oil 
nrati pftrKinu, piione tnd 
cable conn9cli{]iii in wary 
lOQii. lacurrtvligliiii^B. traiti 
arid lawn cire 

Secumv dspoid n tha tama 
SB oria morttv's rsrrt Tha 
laiu |iena4 btfiiii Auguti t 
lor ana yaii 



4 8edr(iiinis, 1 Baths 
I. NO Si) Fl 
HeveitSluilv office 
ONLVIllWino 



4 Bsdroomi, 1 Bsthi 
I JDD Sq Ft 
0MY$1.1Wmo 

Sorry, No Pttl 

Quiet Neighborhood, 

Convenient and Close 

to Campus 

Day: 11 3-0791 

Higin: S37-4M2 



.irge 2 B<>droorii '^i 
CNHilitiilpe Stiu.ri 
Saniistone 
Pebblcbrook 



Qm\ S,«1un)4v 10 J 

[«37-9064 

i.liillKmsOMr«ti4l.can 



• 2000 Coiled* m** 

•1114 Fremont* 

• S19 0aag«< 



Rent-Duplexes 



LOOKING FOR three 
itxMntnates in lour-bed- 

room duplex 500 

Laramla $265 per room 

Washer/ Dryar 

785^10-2918 or 
785-447-0852 

THRSE-BEDFIOOM 
UNIT locaiea at 6. 602 
North Sill No pels. $975/ 
month, available Jun* 1 
785-564-0372. 

WALK TO Class One, 
two. three, four-tiedrbom 
No smoking, no dnnkirig. 
Tvnreis 785-539-1554 



THREE- 
ROOMS, neer 
August lease. 
785-776-2051 



Sm-BED- 
campus. 
pels ok. 




Reni-Duplexa 



FOUR-BEDROOM three 
baths (Augusl> $1260, 
ntoe. Wftstvar/ Dryer $02 FREMONT, Ihree-bed 



1310 N. Iltti- Two-bed 
room, June lease No 
pets, cloaa to campua 
785 539-1975 or 
795.313-8292 

1417 NlCFtOLS. four-bad- 
rooms. family room. 1909 
Kenmar, three-badrooms 
8oth two bathrooms, 
washer/ dryer, garage 
gamQ room, lenced yard/ 
palio 78S-5391177 



THREE -BEDROOM 
HOUSE at 1721 Ander- 
son. Available June 1 Un- 
fumiahed. ott-street pant- 
ing, $750 per month Call 
KSU Foundatwn at 
785-532-7569 or 
785-532-7541 

THREE-BeDROOM, 
TWO bath, one mile west 
ot campus. Waaher and 
dryer provided. $1000 per 
monlti 785-313-7473 

THREE-BEDROOM 
JUNE. July, Augusi Al- 
llanca Projiarty Manage- 
ment 785-539-4357 www.- 

rsru-acm.Mtii 

TWO-BEDROOMS. 
JUNE. July. August. Al- 
liance Froparty Manage- 
men! 7 65- 539-4357. wwmL: 

lem-aem.com 



ADMINISTRATIVE ASSIS- 
TANT- Networks F>lus. ttie 
laador in provMing t>usH 
nass computer servk^s. 
has a tul-Ume posHion prefarabiy 



BANK TELLER 

ale opening tor lut-tirTW 
Irom llrw arxV or dnve-up 
leHer tOOMng lor outgo- 
ing, energetic, proles- 
sional. servica ortenied 
paraon. Mar bank or 
caalt tuftdlng iMparttrtoa 
Is a piut but net raquked 
Forty hour work week. 
Oreal hours. Great bene- 
Ills. Appty at Kansas Stale 
Bank. 1010 WesUoop 
Manhaitan Equal Oppor- 
tunity Employer 

BARTENDINQl $300 • 
day polential No experl- 
snca necessary. Training 
provided. Call 

1-800-985-6520 ant. 144. 

CAMP TAKAJO Naples 
Maine rtciied lor pic- 
hiresque iakelront kKB- 
lion. axceptkxiai facilities 
Mid- June through mid- 
August Counsekx posi- 
tions in tennis, baseball, 
baskatt>sil, soccer, 

lacrosse, golf, tlag loot- 
bal, roller hockey, swim- 
mk^. sailir^. water skiing, 
gymnastics, dance, horse- 
back noing. arctiary, 
weight training, newspa- 
per, photography, video, 
woodworking, ceranscs/ 
pottery, cratts. fine arts, 
silver leweiry, copper 
enamel, nature Study, ra- 
dkv electroniee, 
ooslumer, piano 
niat. muBic instrumervlal- 
ist, badipacking, rock 
cttnAIng, canoaMg/ kayak- 
ing, rapat oourta, sacre- 
tarW, nanny Cat Taka^ 
sl 866-356-2287 Submrt 
applk:atk}n onkne al 
takajo.Gom 

COMPLETE OUTDOORS 
Inc. seeking all positions 
in landscape. Irrlgatkin. 
and maintenance. 

765-776 1930 

HARVEST HELP wanted 
Late May through August 
Pays well 785-587 1956, 
evenings 

HAY COMPANY in search 
of summer workers, larrn 
ekperteiKe needed Excel- 
lent wages. 785-564-2590 

HORTICULTURAL SER 
VICES, tnc is seeking reli- 
able, motivated Individu- 
als for lull-Unie or part- 
time seasonsl positions in 
our retail garden center. 
Above average wages 
commensurate with expe- 
nenca and abiiiMB. App^ 
in parson ai it 524 Land- 
scape Lane. St George, 
Kansas 785-494-2418 or 
785-776-0397 

HOWE LANDSCAPE Inc 
has seveial positions 
evailable loi our iandacap- 
ing. imgaiion and mowing/ 
maintenance crews This 
is for tun lime and part 
time help, with llexible 
schedules lor students, 
four hour 



JOIN THE K-State Onkne PBOjeCT MANAQER. 
team al the Office ot MadI- ClvlcPlus has an opening 
aled Educanon. and oon- ^ our Manhattan heed- 
btbule 10 a variety of kn- quarters ottlce tor a lull- 
ponant K- State web atles ume Project MHiager. 
and appHcatlons Candl This Chatonglng posAkm 
dates must be motivated, entails managing rtkjl^ile 
etpable al learning new wsbsila ladaalgn protects 
skllt quickly, self-di- Irom sian to Imish. Poai- 
rected. able (0 work al tion requires attenttoo lo 
least 15 hours a week, Mlail Ihe ability to man- 
and wiilH^ lo devote at age multiple task, priori- 
least 8 year lo the poel- ties and deadlines and a 
Hon Working with web chaarlul altttude Training 
technok>gies in an ottica ta provUad. Benefits tr\- 
that values its sluoenls ch>de HaMlh, Dental. Paid 
provMas a tun yel chal- Holk)av>, Pakl Vacatkxt 



langing work environment 
Starting wages begkt at 
$7 00 For mors inlortna- 
tlon email us SI OiTwof- 
fkjei9ksu.edu. 

LOOKING FOR part-time 
help in Scrapbook store 
Monday- Wednesday- Fri- 
day daytime 



end 401(k) maUMng. 
Email reauitia in text of 
Word tormal to jobaS- 
cKrtcpJus.oom 



prelerred Pleasa call Sab 
nra 765-410-31 77 

LUNCHROOM/ 



SEVERAL POSITIONS 
available lor liekl techni- 
cians wortdng wtth greater 
Expertence p,,^ chk*ena ki 



Kansas Tlwse po*ltk>na 
are Ideal for anyone kilar- 
ested in graduate sdvool 



PLAY- 

QROUND SUPERVI- '«' wlklllle btokigy. WH be 

$ORS immediate open- f"l««ii lo thiny hours per 

ings- Manhattan- Ogden *••'< starting immedi- 

Elamentaty Schools "'■♦)/ f'i *» W 25 per 

$6.50 per hour one and a htwr All interested per- 

hall- two hours per day. «>"» P*««" »""d resume 

11:00 am- tflO pm Ap- ind ccver letter via e-mail 

plk^bon available SI www • to gregolataksu.adu or 

usd383.org/Dis1rict/Hu- cad 785-532-6413. 

manResourcas/ or apply ^^,^„^^^^^^^^ 

si Human Resources De- y^pg LANDSCAPING Is 

partmeni, 2031 PoyntiAv k.^^^ ^r dependable 

enua Applksatk^w ae- ^1 mo«v««l lui »d p«1 

cepled until positkins «• a™ he*.. ConvMHlV* 

filled Apply lo Manhattan- ^.^^ ,^,„^ ^^j^^ 

Ogden USD 383, 2031 htugt be 1 8 with Dt. Apply 

Poynti Avenue, Manhal- by e-mail lapsirriaatk>n«s- 
lan, KS 66502 




INDOS FOR sale: 

Two ana three-bedroom 
starting al $112,850. oone- 
gialevilla.com 
765-537-2096. 



room, one tialh. no pets 
Available June 1 
785-539-1975 or 

785-31 3-8292 

ATTRACTIVE 

able June 1. Locations. 
2076 Collega View, 2505 
Wlnne, 1841 Platte. $950' 
rrvonth. No pets. Contact 
Ryan Rehtait. 

785-778-7 708. 
765-3134458, 



Call Ragku at 
EnnarakI Property Man- 
agemenl 785-587-9000 



Need a 
Subleaser 



Advertise 

785-532-6555 



hookups, onstreet park- 
ing, great k)calion, no 
pets/ smoking. 

785-532-8256. 

FOURBEDROOM, TWO 
bath duplex for reni plus 
study room. Ona-haif 
bkick Irom KSU. Every- 
thing rtew. comptotaly re- 
modeled including new 
hardwood floors, new 
floar covertngs, new 

kHctien cabinets snd appli- 

ances (even washer end (t'|VE-BEDR(MIll',""fBB 
dryer). Trash and lawn ^^^ ^^g, lor rwt 181 
Mre meludwi No pel* ^^„ j^„, ^,„ 

!'^. "^*' i'fUL?'^, Waalter/ *yer. window alr- 
' "' condlBonlng. Fenced back- 
yard, pets alkrwed Off- 
street parking $ 1 500/ 
month 785-539-4949 

PI Some Fivf^sfBRSSKT j;:^ 
July. August. AWanoe 
tfin? Property Management. 

Cp* 785-539-4357. www.ienl- 

apm com 

~ FOR I^ENT. I^vier lour- 
bedroom duplex Good h^ 
eaten with dishwasher, 
wastwr and dryer No 
pets $ti60 

785-537-7597 

FOUR LARGE bedroom, 
two bath, quiet k^cation 
near KSU Washer/ dryer. 
A/C. No smoking/ peta 
June 765-S39-6653 

FOUR TO five tjedrooms, 
two bath, washer/ dryer, 
central air, dishwasher 
Clow 10 campus. 
788-832-9564 

FOUR -BEDROOM AND 
all -tiedroom houses 

Cirae lo campus and Ag- 
gieville. Parking and laun- 
dry 785-539-5800 



FABULOUS 
lour-bedroom. 
one-half bath, 
home 



UPDATED 

one and 

tjrtcti ranch 

west of 



KSU. $149,900. 
785-539-6751 



Call 




A<5lvertls 
' It In the 

CoWeqmn*' 




K*w^!*rinTrfinrrT«t 



CHRISTIAN FEMALE 

Iwo female room- 
slartmg fall 2007 
August ip May lease New 
Itnee-twdroom. Iwo bath 
house with washer' dryer. 
$350 pkis one-third utili- 
ties Call 647-975-1464 

FEMALE HOUSEMATE 
No drinking/ smoking 
1285/ month One-third 
uUklies. washer/ diyer, Au- 
gust lease. aml- 
Ca31 38ksu.edu. 
785-537-1464 

MALE. WALK to dass. all 
furnished, lower level, 
washei dryer wittKMit me- 
ter No smoking, drinking, 
pets. 765-539-1554. 

ROOMMATE NEEDED 
until May 31 Rent $275/ 
month plus one-fourth uHl- 
lieg Washer/ dryer, dish- 
washer In house Can 
785-537-3737 

ROOMMATES NEEDED 
for two twdnxirrvB In live- 
bedroom house. Next lall 
Cbse to campus Outdoor 
pets weloanis 

820-382-7241. 

TWO ROOMS available in 
tour -bedroom house, le- 
fflele roommates warned. 
$290 plus ulikties. 
318-481-2317 or 

913-206-57^. 



avaVsble in Manhattan, 
KS This chiallanging posi- 
bon requires the ability to 
handle muMple tasks and 
pfkirtliea while mamlain- 
ktg a positive and ener- 
gatk: altRude $12/ hour 
full-time only, opporturii- 
tles lor advancement E- 
mall rssun->e in Mktosoh 
Word or t«id lormat to: |ob- 
sOdvlc^us.eom. 

AS NEEDED JUVENILE 
INTAKE AND ASSESS- 
MENT OFFICER Fliley 
County Cwwnunltt Cor 
nCSong IS accepting appk- 
cattons for several as 
needed, on-call luvenils In- 
take and assessrrtenl offi- 
cers. Minimum require- 
ments induds a high 
school diploma. Hourly 
rate for call-oul duty is 
$10 On-can retmburse- 
ment is $30/ day On-call 
officers work a rotating on- 
call schedule, wtlh tfie 
usual schedule tieing one 
week ot on-call duty every 
8- 10 weeks Law anforoe- 
menl experience or direct 
experience working with 
juveniles is preferred 
Valid dnvsr's lk:ense and 
ability to work ttexibie 
f)Our« Is mandatory. Appli- 
cations can be obtained 
Irom Riley County Clerk s 
Office. 110 Courthouse 
Plaza, Manhattan. KS 
66502, or visit our web- 
site www.nlaycountj/ks. ■ 
gpy Riiay County Is an 
equal opportunity em- 
ployei 



tilocks ot lime Applicsnts 
must be 16 years or age 
and have a vakd drivers li- 
cansa. Starting iwaga' is 
$6.00/ hour Apply three 
way^. in person Monday 
through Frxlay- al 12780 
Madison Rd In Riley, call 
765-485-2857 to obtain 
an appllcalKin. or email 
us at ttoweiandAitAnbu.- 

QBt 



Got o\d 
stuff? 



RID 




in the 

KwsAs Stati-: 

C()I.LH(iIAN 

532-6565 






Network 

Support 

Technician 



Salina Public Schools is seeking a 
professional to join the Information 
Technology team in delivering 
services to 1 700-t- certified and 
classified employees. 3-5 Years 
experience with Windows operating 
systems, A■^ and Network 
Certifications. Ability to lift and 
deliver 40 pounds. Salary 
commensurate with qualifications 
and experience. Applications 
accepted until filled. For more 
information or to apply, go to 
Wy>v.usd505.com , EOE 



bcgkiba! nel 



call 



785-587-2000 Equal Op- 785-539-8875, 9am-4pm. 
portunity Empioyer. 



MATH TEACHER: USD 

378 IS accepting applKa- VILLAGE INN. |olrv our 
ttons for a high school foam I Now hmng tuK-time 
math teacher Contact •«! part-time servans and - 
Backy PuKz at hosts and part-time oooka v 

al our Mantvatlan, KS T 
restaurant Competitive 
wages, friendly environ- - 
ment, giaai benetits and 
opportunlUes tor advance- 
ment, /^iply in person tt 
the Manhattan Village Inn. 
204 TutHe Creek Blvd. 
Equal l3cportunity Em- 



bpultz9usd37e com or 
785-465 4000 

NOW HIRING Frklge 

WtmleBale Lxjuor 10- 20 

hours per week Apply 
wittiin 

PART- TIME cashier 



and 
associate needed 

Must be available ployer. 

evenings and weekends ■ ^^^^^— ^^ 

Appiy St Midwesl Ace WILDCATSNEEDJOBS - 

Hanlwara 600 TuWe COM PAID survey Ukers 

Creek &vii needed in Manhattan. 

PUV SPORTS! Have '00% tree to loin CItek on 

fun' Save rtkjrwy' Maine •U"™y* 

™"* ."".""^ '!'"_.^"'S WlfTTER/ SPRINQ Posl- 
ttons AvaUabla. Earn up to 



counselors to tea<^. AH 
land, adventure and water 
sports Greal summer! 
CaK 868-844-6060. apply 
t^mpcedarcom 

PROGRAMMER- CtVIC- 
PLUS IS the nations lead- 
Htg providei o< City, 
County, and School web- 
sites. Full-lime posltwn m 
Menttaltan Mk^rosolt ASP 
and SOL eipertance re- 
quired $15.50/ hour plus 
tirrw and a ha/f for over- 
bme. Benefits mckjde 
Health. Denial. Paid ftofi- 
days, Pakl Vacatkir, and 
401 K matching Email re- 
sume in Microsoft Word at 
text lormat 10 (oti8®Civic- 
plus.com 

PROJECT MANAGER 
ChncPlus has an opening 
In our Manhattan head- 
quarters office lor a tull- 
tmie project managsf 
This chalier>ging poartion 
emails managing muhlpie 
websne redesign pro)ects 
from start to finish Posi- 
tion requires attention to 
detail, Ihe ability lo man- 
age muNiple tasks, pnori- 
lies artd deadlines and a 
cheerful attitude Training 
is piovKled Benetits in- 
clude health dental, paid 
holidsys, |}aid vacation 
and 401 (k) matching. 
Email resume in text Or 
Word lormal to 

(ot>s tgi civicpiu s , c om 



$150 per day Experlanoa ', 
nol required Undertiovar >- 
shoppers needed to judge ~ 
retail btkI dining sslabtish- - 
ments Call 800-722-4791 . 




Op«n Marki't 




COACH BOB Hu 
bobblahead dolls Limited . 
edition, in original box. r 
two availatiia. meke olfer " 
or trad* Can Dallas at ' 
813-522-1048. .^ 

HIDE A bed couch. $100 ' 
or besi offer Table arkt . 
tour chairs $225 or betl 
oKsr Stove $100 Or beat 
oiler 785-539-0227 

KING SIZE waterbed. 
complste setup includes '. 
hame sheets, knar, mat 
tress and pad. $200 
765-567.5720 

POOL TABLE lot sale 
Good conditKm Call 
785-564-1465 



Pregnancy 
Testing Center 

539-3338 



5u|do|ku 

Fill in the grid so that every row, 

every column, and every 3x3 box 

contains the digits 1 through 9 

with no repeats. 



9 1 

5 2 



5 7 
2 



8 



3 

7 6 
4 



3 

1 8 



9 

5 6 

7 



g 6 
1 



3 

6 2 
9 



9 

1 6 



7 2 
4 3 



Solution and tips 
at www.sudoku.com 



h',.iiil,>/u. A'l'ij/ //*■//-. /V,,//0/if/-.i/, 

Frtf pni;iiiiit( > li'vliiii; 

llllllllt (IHlt'llfl'lltllll >4l\i(l 

Suini' tlui ifsulU • Cull Tor iipiMiliiiitii'iii 

,l..-,ll, lii-.^ IhHIi . illi|4l' 11. kli.i,- 1... \ 1. , 

' MiMi In '1 ,1.111 ^ |i Hi 



^ff »ir»» m % » <>^ 



^ ^*»*» *-^n»- ^ J- •» j»^ r-^ -1 



Page 12 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, Feb. 26, 2007 



FICTION 



Earbud Evil The alarm clock was the first to go 



KANSAS STHE coil EOIW 

* 
Editor's note: Viis is the first segment of "Earbud Evil," a 
fictional story the Collegian will publish daily for the next three 
weeks This story (olloms Alex, a fictional K-State student, as he 
deals with a campus-wide crisis that threatens the university. 

Though the names of real people will accompany made-up 
chantcters. all events are fictional This is intended for entertain- 
ment and is not factually based 

I had a nice alarm clock once, but 1 broke it 

It was this little plastic box the same size and shape as most 
digital alarm clocks: four inches wide, three inches deep and two 
inches high with a big snooze button and the red, glaring numbers 
they all come with 1 sometimes wonder if clock designers suffer 
from peer crushing pressure. 

This alann was special, though, because I never had to set the 
time. It simply found the right time when 1 plugged it in. The clock 
would him off during overnight power outages, then pop back on 
just in time to set off the alarm It remembered its set alarm time, 
too, through some mechanism I doubt I'll ever understand. 

Most people like dependable things, but I came to dislike 
this alarm clock on mornings when the wilt to face the day was 
particularly elusive. I'd wish it would fail bom time to time like a 



normal, cheap, imported electronic device is supposed to do. 

But this one didn't. It rang every morning and pulled my sorry 
self from my scarce slumber and ordered me to face the world 

I hated this timepiece for operating, for^ve the pun, like clock- 
work. It was not an aid that kept me from missing the classes I'd 
paid so much to attend, but an evil, inanimate little demon that 
ruined what often was the best part of my day So I killed it, in a 
manner of speaking. 

This clock had seen plenty of falls since I bought it frrahman 
year Its first, as far as I know, was the five feet between the shelf 
my left arm knocked it from and the dirty tile floor of the hard- 
ware store that made me buy it. The second was the^hrec feet be- 
tween my car's trunk and the concrete parking lot in front of the 
same store Three, four, five and sbc came before I ever plugged it 
in, and dozens more came during its lifetime. 

Perha{^ it was a suicidal alarm clock 

The final drop, not two feet from my nightstand to a wadded- 
up coat at my bedside, came a few days ago when I took a swipe 
at the darned squealing that never stopped. I woke up two hours 
later, realized what I'd done and jolled out of bed. After a quick 




Spring Break 



Cnttoswr* Oaly 

TM4M ptcMnt cM^on far d«c«MM 



any lotion 
in stock 

lUluramie^iPI 



Holrcut & HiUti 
^6 EytbrowWox 
^10 Mm's Haircuts 
^2S Mossags w/ KSU ID 

* 10 Ptdicurt w/ Any Sirvict 

3U0*WPHBCIII«>L 7>S.S39.1t2i liUUlHWm.tSti503 gPIIK 3-31.07 



shower and shave, I tossed a stack of books into my pack and left. • 

My precious 20 GB iPod, with the 895 son^ I normaUy need • 
to have with me. stayed behind. 1 might have been humming • 

"Fli^t of the Bumblebee" throu^out my humed morning rou- j 
tine, but music was not a priority this day. J 

I cursed myself for mining one of my few dependable pieces J 
of property as I made my way north along I7th Street to campus, J 
where I hoped to make it to the end of my second morning class. 
Mass Communication in Society. Sneaking into class wasnl a Z 
problem because it's in Umberger 105, one of the lai^est rooms on 
campus. * 

I walked fast but not fast enough. I got in the doors just before ■ 
the professor made his last remark about radio and something -^ 
called an "Audion T\ibe." 1 heard the roar of countless backpacks 
zipping closed as a few hundred students got up to leave, and 1 
went right back out before the human tidal wave overcame me. 

1 felt lousy for breaking the clock and missing two classy whOe * 
I moped my way west to Botany lab in Ackert Hall. 

I hadn't the slightest idea that my alarm clock's unlikely demise ■ 
ultimately saved my life. 



IPmO ©sjyeKsr ycDOiff \stoOQt? 




lj^8_Moro 



Get your body bikini resdyl 
liiilliai til Illy MS 




ciG.iAi 



>o\o 



n I II 






OOM 



Mcn l— HH^^t ihcn 

you book your 

appointment foi j 

cut and 
hlfhiltc 

receive 3 

''" i\tv. 



ESSENTIA 



78S-537-3200 



Mention this ad and receive 
one of the following specials: 

Basic Monicure 
and Pedicure 

All over color 
with Haircut 

All over Hilite 
and Haircut 




Claflin 



1800 Claflin Road 



are 

the jj^^^d in 



HAVE A SAFE SPRING BREAK 



ANDDIUVB 



ilwal. 



w^ 



^ We Specialize In AoCoaftdc ^ 

Tnnsadasiona and Ctutclkcs 
f Domestic It Most PareleiiGaist ^ i 

• Certified Teclinlcuuis • rT^^W^^ 



D1ACII03IS 



SEKVINGTtI£M.'\NtI^n^ AREA F0ROVER2Z YEARS! 



Mi)n.-I-ri. Ua.m.S p.m. 
2i.B Sky-Vuo l.n. 
Manh;Mi,iii. KS 



785-539-2900 




[LDCAT 
VILLAGE 

4 Large Bedrooms 

Walk-In Closets 

Washer & Dryer 

Safe Room 



Alorica inc. 



FLEXIBLE SCHEDULES 
FUN ENVIRONMENT 
FANTASTIC WAGES 



GAIN WORK EXPERIENCE 
BUILD YOUR RESUME 
START YOUR CAREER 



^^776-2425 



NOW HIRING 



www.aloricajobs.com 

5970 SYKES BLVD 
MANHAHAN, KS 66502 

PH: (785) 564-4413 



CLASSIFIEDS 



Classifieds continue ; 
on the next page • 



LET'S HELP OUR 

LOCAL CHARITIES. 



Please consider a 

contribution to support 

our local charities. 



THINK GLOBALLY. 

AQ LOCALLY 




Rent-Apt U n^mtsfieti Rent-Apt Un/umisbed 



Biillelin Bodid ■ Housing Real Estate 



AnnoufKementi 



LEARN TO FLVi K-SlHie 
Flying ClMb has Rve Bir- 
pitiM and lOMMt rates 
CM 785-776-1744, mim- 




Loit ind found Kit c*n 
b* plae«d fr«* tor thr** 

day* 



Rent-Apt. fumlsh&i 



Manfiittan CITY Ordi- 
nance *9l4 auuraa av- 
•ry parton aqual opportu- 
nity In houalng wlttiout dl t- 
tlnctlon An account of 
raca. tax, familial atatu*. 
mllltarv alalua. dlaablllty, 
religion, age. color, na- 
tional origin or an tail ry. 
Vtotatlon* altouid b* ra> 
porlad to the Olractof of 
Human naaourca* al City 
Hall, (TBSlSa 7-2440. 



MANHATTAN CrTV Ordl- 
nanc* 4A14 aaatiraa av- 
ary parai^n aqual opfioftu- 
nity In hotjalng wtttHHJliMa- 
Unction on account of 
raca. aax, famHIal ilatua, 
mHllttY tlMia, dtaaMHty, 
rallglon, aga, colot. na- 
lloflal origin ot antaatry. 
VMatlotii ahouki ba ra- 
pe rtad 10 ll*« Olf«clor of 
Human naaowrcM •! Ctty 
Hall, (71S)UT-I440. 

AVAILABLE JUNE 1. one- 
bed roorr^. large, clean. 
Only pay electrtcfty. Srrull 
pets allowed Balcony, 
great location $570/ 
month 7B5-S41-72B9. 



( -all 785-5;)2-()555 to 

Advertise 

Kansas State Colle(;ian 
Classifieds 



1117 VATTIEH Naw . 
electric Two -bedroom a, 
appliancet lumished, no 
peta Clo»a lo campui. 
7B5 539-1975 or 
795-31 3-8Z92 

ADJACENT TO campus 
Ona-bfldroom, central 
Ileal and air. All bills paid, 
encept elaclrlcily. Juna 
I el posse ulon $47S 
78S-532-B771 oi 

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ALLIANCE PROPERTY 
MANAQEMENT Ona~bed- 
room Juna, July, August. 
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room apanmenlV housas 
lor June and August 
leases 7S&>Sa4.08S7 



ONE. TWO. ibrs«. and 
iour-twdroom apartmants 
Close to campus and og- 
gievilie Part<ing and laun- 
dry 795-539-5800 



ONE. TWO. Itvrea, lour, 
live, all bedroom apart - 
menu houses new to cam- 
pus Washer/ dryer, cen- 
tral air No Pots. 
TftS-UT'TOSO. 



ONE-BEDROOM APART- 
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at 1111 Ptait Avallabte 
June 1st Unlumishad, 
central air, parking, water 
and traah psKj No pets 
1375 per month. Cad KSU 
Foundation at 

785-532-7569 or 

785-532-7541 



ONE BED ROOM TO live- 
bedrooms Apartments, 
duplexes and homes 
Most close to campus 
Some larther away June 
Of August leaaat. Check 
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PARK PLACE Apart- • 
menls One- Bedrooms. • 
Summer/ fall teasing. Pels 2 
wetoomo One- h«« mile • 
Irom KSU si Sath Child" 
and Ciallln. 785-S39-2961 

PXdk hlktl Apart- 
mens Two- bedrooms." 
Pels welcome Summer/*, 
Fall ieesing. One- haH^ ■ 
rnlie Irom KSU at Seth ' 
Child and Ciallln. '. 
765539 2951 

room apartments avail-. ', 
able in August Cloat to. ■ 
campua. Water and traah ; 
paid Coin operated laun- i 
dry 785-537.78t0,' ' 

785-537-2255 ' [ 

TWO, THREE and lour- ; 
bedrooms, ckwe lo cant- ' 
pus, cerlrat air, dish- ; 
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No pata. available Fabru- ' 
ly I 785-539-0866 ,'! 

ONE- THREE-BED- ' 

ROOMS, near campui. ', 
August tease, pels oil. ~ 
785-776-IOSt 



\ • 1 "- V ^ 



Page 14 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, Feb. 26. 2007 



Operation in India helps student regain use of his arm 



ByWUIo<wWlllt»m*on 

KANSAS STATKCHLEfilAN 

Levi Flory has not been able 
to use his arm since a motor- 
cycle wreck in July 2001. 

Flory, senior in horticulture, 
landed on his shoulder so hard 
he severed three of the five 
nerves in his spinal cord that 
controlled his right arm. Doc- 
tors said there was no chance 
to correct the injury and that 
he would never be able to move 
his arm again. 

"You've screwed something 
up we can't fix, so live with it," 
Flory said the doctors told him. 

Flory said he did not give 
up, though 

He kept talicing to doctors 
and tried to find different opin- 
ions. He was referred to Dr. Ra- 
hul Nath in Houston, who took 
some nctves from the back of 
Flor/s calves and put them 
into his arms 

"Not as much came back as 
1 had hoped," Flory said. "I got 
a little bit of function and a little 
bit of feeling" 

About three years later, Nath 
recommended a procedure that 
could restore more movement 
and feeling to Florys arm. 



Flory had a choice to make; 
he could have Nath, who had 
very little experience with the 
surgery, perform the opera- 
tion at a cost of $250,000 or 
he could travel to India, where 
doctors had done the surgery 
numerous times with a 98-per 
cent success rate In India, the 
surgery would cost $3,750. 

"There was no qu^ion in 
our mind," said Julie Danah, 
Floiys mother. 

Flory and Darrah traveled to 
India in December 2006, where 
doctors performed an intensive 
surgery on him for 1 1 hours. 

"They live their job," Darrah 
said. They breathe it. Its phe- 
nomenal." 

The entire trip, including 
airplane tickets, surgery, hous- 
ing, food and hospital fees for 
both Flory and his mother, cost 
$11,000. 

"They took such good care 
of me over there," Flory said. 
They were so dedicated to 
their work." 

Flory said his medical ex- 
perience in India exceeded the 
standards in the United States. 

"Here in the States you'd see 
a doctor the day before you go 
in and have a surgery, and then 



you'd see him the day before 
your release," Flory said. "They 
(the doctors in India) came and 
checked on me twice a day, ev- 
ery day for two weeks." 

Family biend John Bechtel 
started a fund to help Flory and 
Darrah while they were in In- 
dia. 

Bechtel said he had known 
the family for a long time and 
though someone should start a 
fund, so he and Jeny Wark, an- 
other friend, took it upon them- 
selves, 

Bete h el and Wark organized 
a rafile and put advertisements 
in the newspapers and on the 
radio stations They also set 
up an account with Commu- 
nity First Bank to which donors 
could send money. 

TTie project raised a good 
amount of money for Flory, 
Bechtel said, although it did 
not cover everything. He would 
not say how much mon^ was 
raised. 

Flory still has his arm in a 
sling and has not fully regained 
movement and feeling, but he 
said he hopes for continued 
improvement in the coming 
years. 

"In the next three years, I 




CatrinaRMWenlCOLLECIAN 

Jtrtmy Flory, SMilor In hortkuftura, Iravatod to India for surgery in December 2006. He said he opted for 
surgery outside of the United States because it cost $3, 7 SO In India, as opposed to $2SO,000 in Houston. 

should be in some condition to thing similar, to contact me. a brick wall," she said, but they 



work and slowing down on sur- 
geries," he said. 

Flory said he wants to raise 
awareness for getting alterna- 
tive medical help 

"I just want to get the word 
out there, if you have some- 



and 1 will help you go down the 
right path," Flory said. 

Darrah said the reason she 
and Flory found the doctors 
in India is because they never 
wanted to give up 

"We just kepi rurming into 



kept looking. 

Flory said it took his will 
and determination to find all of 
his options. 

"It's changed my way of life," 
Flory said. "It has changed the 
way I look at life," 



Ceremony to celebrate low-income housing development opening 



By Logan C. Adams 

lUNSASSTATKOlttGtAN 

A ribbon-cutting ceremony 
will celebrate a new low -in- 
come housing development in 
northwest Manhattan Ttiesday 

The celebration for "The 
Gardens at the Flint Hills" is 
set to start at 11 a.m. Tuesday 
at 1400 Flint Hills Place. 

The Manhattan Area Hous- 
ing Partnerehip and the Man 
hattan Housing Authority own 



the development, near the in- 
tersection of Kimball and Man- 
hattan avenues. 

Jo Ann Sutton, executive di- 
rector for the housing author- 
ity, said workers broke ground 
for the 48-unit development at 
the end of 2005 

"I believe it was the coldest 
day in December," Sutton said. 

She said the buildings most- 
ly more finished last month, 
and only a few minor details 
require completion. Half the 



units already arc rented out. 
she said. 

The development's units arc 
two- and three- bedroom apart- 
ments that people who meet 
certain eligibility requirements 
can rent. The requirements in- 
clude income and citizenship 
restrictions, she said. 

The person or people in 
each household must make 
less than 60 percent of median 
area income to rent a unit, Sut- 
ton said, and the rent varies 



doku 



J 



1 



Check Out 



in the 

C I a 5 s i f i e 



ilf:f.ii}mt;ilil'' nn.ility sr'vwi^ 

^5c self-serve 
copies 




APARTMENT HUNTING 101 

Most Locations Near KSU 

You can WALK to: 

Class • Library 
AggievUle • Banks 
Restaurants • Coffee Shops 
Watering Holes (NO DUts) 

Clean 1-2-3-4 BR Apartments, 
Duplexes, and Houses 

DOWT SKIP CLASS BECAUSC VCMJ 
CAMT FIND A PARKIMC SPACBI 

^mOii^ STUDENTS RENT MW; 

SINCE 1974 

view our property starting the 19th -26th 

www.moor^propertymaTiagement.com 
Lease signing begins Feb. 26th 

785-537-0205 




9^*^ iVti^^tm^ 



x'S^^ 



% 



Friday. March 2, 2007 
At K-State Student Union 



Oral Presentations: 

Poster Display: 

Poster Q&A: 

Award Ceremony: 



10:00 am to Noon (Undergraduate session) 
1:00 pm to 4:00 pm {Concurrent graduate sessions) 

10:00 am to 4:00 pm 

11 :30 am to 1:30 pm 
4iJ0pm 



'V 



Come listen to students talk atwut their research I 
Sponsored by The Graduate School and Graduate Student Council. 

Drinks are provided! 



depending on income and unit 
size. She said it ranges (between 
$400 and $590 per month. 

About $3.6 million in tax 
credit funds and a $200,000 
loan paid for the development, 
Sutton said She said there are 
funds left over, which wilJ be 
kept in reserve. 

'The property is self-sus- 
taining," Sutton said. "The 
rents will pay the bills." 

The tax credit funds come 
from taxpayers who donate 



money toward a fund for spe- 
cial uses to get a larger amount 
taken of! of their tax liability, 
she said 

The two- bedroom units 
have 960 square feel of space, 
Sutton said She added that 
the three-bedroom units have 
1,145 square feet of space, Sut- 
ton said. 

She said the housing au- 
thority and the partnership 
combined efforts to build the 
development. 



The housing authority con- 
tributed the land, and the part- 
nership worked with a devel- 
oper to get it built, Sutton said. 

The housing authority is 
managing the development, she 
said, in addition to more than 
200 units it operates around 
Manhattan. 

Invitations to the ceremony 
indicated drivers should go 
north on Manhattan Avenue 
past K-State campus and turn 
left into Flint Hills Place. 



<^&m<:A'^ ttiA) A Lifatime 



— — Everyone's doing it. 1 

To jnnfi.nct your mMttlon.. .rtMl lt«l.l. IM. Ta »fc»tB^ CJ|[ yjJHg | 



Strike a pose 





these 

k-staters 

did 



we'll be in aggievJile thursday. march 1, 

9:00 - 11 :00 p.m. under varney's m^quee 

and Saturday, march 3 at bramlage 

for the Oklahoma state game. 

so bring your friends and strike a pose! 

it's free and the best shots will 
be in the 2007 royal purple yearbook. 



II. 



royafmiml 

/\j^'yearDoot( 



e 

k&dvd 




to see other students who got their pictures taken go to 
royalpurp\Q.ksu,Qdu 

t 

1 ^_____ 



k /^^K A N S A S STATE 

" Collegian 



INSIDE 

Prins' publications 
and world travels 
haw put K-State 
on the map. 

imttKfttitil 




www.ksUtecollegian.com 



Tuesday, February 27,2007 



VoLlU.NalH 








THE DECLINE OF 



handwriting 

Technological advances have made 
written communication more difficult 




By Kristvn Rodarkh 

KAKSAS STATE (OLLEQIKN 

A teacher stands in front of the class- 
room, lecturing while students scramble 
to handwrite notes. 

But Josh Bralley, junior in criminol- 
ogy, sits at the front of the classroom 
behind his computer, typing notes along 
with the lecture. 

He has typed his notes since 2003. 

"It's a lot faster, and 1 can take notes 
more accurately," Bralley said. "I can also 
type down what the teacher is saying." 

In fact, students without laptops 
sometimes struggle to keep up with lec- 
tures, according to an article in The New 
York Times. Handwriting is becoming 
more like an "unused muscle." 

Kate Gladstone, a handwriting spe- 
cialist in Albany, NY., told The New York 
'Hmes a student needs to write 100 words 
per minute to keep up with the pace of an 
instructor, which is impossible. Someone 
who is writing by hand can only manage 
about 30 words per minute, she said. 

More than 51 percent of college class- 



rooms nationwide now have wireless ac- 
cess, according to a survey by the Cam- 
pus Computing Project. 

"Wireless is a great thing," said Ken- 
neth C. Green, founding director of The 
Campus Computing Project, in a release. 
"It fosters access, mobility and coUatx>ra- 
tive work among students and faculty." 

At the beginning of the fall 2006 se- 
mester, more than 70 percent of K-State 
had wireless connections, Rebecca 
Gould, director of the Information Tech- 
nology Assistance Center, told the Col- 
legian. 

With more emphasis on technology, 
however, the importance of handwriting 
skills seemingly is decreasing 

"It's partially because of text messag- 
ing and e-mail," Bralley said. 

The other reason people use legs cur- 
sive is because the only time they need it 
is for signing documents, Bralley said 

"Most people come up with a mixture 
of cursive and long hand," he said 

Carol Russell, instructor of linguistics 

SM HANDWRITING I>t9«10 










Belly dancing promotes 'good body image' 



ByWUtowWillMinuon 

KANSAS StAItCOlUQAN 

Dancers swayed their hips and un- 
dulated their torsos at a program last 
night in the K-State Student Union 
I The program. "Belly Dance Your 
Way to a Better Body Image," featured 
performers from the Maya Zahira 
School of Belly Dance. 

The five dancers, wearing brightly 
colored costumes, performed three 
pieces The first was to a traditional 
belly dancing song, the second to a 
modem song and the third was to a 
drum solo. The dancers said they con 
sider belly dancing to be positive for 
female body image 

Mika Selm, sophomore in educa 
tion, said she loved the belly dancing 
community. 

'There is always an aura of accep- 
tance," Selm said. 

Amanda Ratzlafi, junior in apparel 



and textiles, said one of die main rea 
sons she was drawn to belly dancing 
was the pictures she saw on the Za 
hira School's Web site 

"Our school promotes not only 
healthy body image but also cultural 
awareness and education," said Gaitri, 
assistant director lo the Maya Zahira 
School and K-State graduate 

Belly dancing has a long history, 
she said. 

"It emphasized the the movement 
of the womb," she said. 'They were 
moves that were practiced lo help 
prepare a women for giving birth," she 
said. "'Keep in mind Ihey didn"l have 
epidurals back then." 

The program was sponsored by 
Sensible Nutrition and Body Image 
Choices, or SNAC. It is the first of a 
series of events for Eating Disorders 
Awareness Week. 

"With all the negative images peo- 
ple see in the news and media daily, 




iMtyn Brown j COtlEGIHN 
TMchlng b«1ly dancing txtrcUts. Gaitri, assistant director of tha Maya Zahira 
School of Bally Danct, wraps up a presentation by teaching the dudtence basic 
steps. The pfeseniation began with three dances from Gattri and students in her 
Advanced Belly Dancing class taught at UFM Community learning Center. 



its refreshing to get a reality check on 
what's really important," said Zoe Gill, 
vice president of SNAC and senior in 

dietetics. 

Other events include "Real Wom- 



en, Real Curves," a presentation by 
a model from the Dove Campaign 
for Real Beauty, Ihe RkkI and Mood 
Workshop and Fearless Friday: A Day 
Without Dieting 



Primary 

polls open 

today 



rottoJH 



By Logan C Adwiu 

KANSAS STATE (OlLEaAN 

Voting begins at 8 am. today in 
the Student Governing Association's 
primary election. Voters will choose 
which two pairs 
of candidates ygft I 
for student body jtj 
president will ad If-Udlt.adb 
vonce to the gen 
eral election next week 

Students must log on to sgiuelet 
tiom.k'itate.edu with their K-Statc 
elD and password and choose one of 
the four pairs of candidates The polls 
will close Wednesday at 6 p.m. 

Nick Levendofsky. SGA elections 
commissioner, said students can use 
any computer connected to the Inter- 
net to vote. He said computers would 
not be set up just for voting as there 
had been in previous years. 

Candidates are forbidden from 
setting up places to vote by SGA 
elections regulations 

Ixvendofsky, junior in agricultural 
communications and journalism, said 
he expected the results to be tabulal 
ed and ready fur announcement IS lo 
20 minutes after the polls close. That 
could be delayed, he said 

"1 don't want to come out and say 
there will be a problem, but anythini; 
could happen with a computer sy.<> 
tern," Levendofsky said. 



Commitee 

conducts 

survey about 

rec expansion 



By Hannah Blick 

KANSAS STATE COilE&tAN 



Last Friday, all full-time K- Slate 
students received a survey request via 
e mail from the Student Governing 
Association regarding the possible 
expansion of the Peters Recreation 
Complex. 

Lucas Maddy, student body presi 
dent and co-chair of the expansion 
proposal committee, along with his 
co-chair, Jason fbpp. junior in agri 
cultural business, put together a com- 
mittee to investigate student interest 
in the future of the rec center. 

They visited several other univer- 
sity rec complexes for ideas and in 
spiration. traveling most recently to 
the University of Missouri -Columbia, 
home of the recently updated. No 
1 rec complex in the nation, Maddy 
said. 

"1 was really impressed with how 
professionally everything was run 
there." Maddy said "Every employee 
followed a strict dress code, from 
their matching polos to just an over- 
all neat appearance It was very well 
organized" 

Maddy and the rest of the com- 
mittee were impressed with more 
than just the dress code of the Miz- 

SetltECPi9etO 



Today's forecast 

^ J^|| Paiily cloudy 



High:S} Low:}8 



INSIDE 



lust In ttm* for shorts and bathing suit w*athw, 
turn for an irrfonrutional looii A (esKtng 
pofceliin skin behind through modern advifKK 
In tanning including tanning beds, lotions, pills 
and aiitrush tanning. 

SMHoryPigtlZ 



CAMPUS NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 



G>lumbia University 
leader to speak 

James Neal, vice president tot infor- 
nution lechnotogy and unlvenfty 
librarian at Colurribla UniwryTy, 
will prfsenl a lecture on the currwH 
andfuturrtrendiolthe acadernk 
meardi llbiary l:3&-3 pm. in the 
H«nlsplimRoom(i(HaleLI)rarY It 
b part of X-SUte^ ^KmsltS \xmt 



Film to show liattles 
of soldiers after Iraq 

"The Ground rruth,''a Wm about U.S. 
sokJien who served the milltiry in 
Iraq and wtunwd home lo fate new 
battles with feruly and ftwflcis win 
show at 7 pm. In Room 21 ) of the 
K-State Student Union, It is one of 
many films shown during KStales A 
Season (or Nonviolence: 64 Days 64 
Ways 10 Practice Nonviolence. 



Photography exhibit 
displays student woric 

An eirtiibit of the 32nd Annual 
Shident Photography Contevt wil 
feature student wxt today through 
febi 28 in the Kemper Art Gallery. 
located in the K State Student Union 
Student worii will be displayed 
homSa.m toSp.m weeluiaiillhe 
contest and exNut is sponsored by 
(he Union Program Council. 



f«nH and war I ^ "^^' ^""^ ^' '^ Ammum wnh ittlgtous 
UUU dllU Wai I ,ffi(i««,j(w«tt,eylW about the war ti Iraq, 

B Oppose the war 
I Support tive war 



S«i 







AH Americins Catholics Jews Monnons Proltstants No Religion 



Page 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Tuesday, Feb. 27, 2007 



iau C/effifi fid Wk f785; 776-3771 



www ctaftinbQoks.com 



fax: (785) 776-1009 



Puzzles I Eugene Sheffer 



ACROSS 

1 Witn 5- 
Across. 
non- 
eaters of 
quiche? 

5 See 
('Across 

S Vivacity 

12 Plankton 
compo- 
nent 

13 Sean 
Lennon's 
mom 

14 Peart 
HartKjf 
site 

15 'Murder. 
Sha 
Wrote" 
heroine 

17 Color- 



18 Corn 
spike 
tS Pang 
21 Tic 

24 What 
Citi FiekJ 
will 
replace 

25 Diplo- 
macy 

26 Revue 
segments 

30 tntention 

31 Bakery 
workers 

32 Historic 
time 



33 Country 
singer 
Wilson 

35 Desire 

36 Help a 
hood 

37 Home of 
the 
brave? 

3BFall 

41 Fix the 
sound- 
track 

42 Dazzle 

43 Griped 
46 Gel your 

secortd 
wir\d 

49 Wet 
wriggler 

50 Car 

51 Females 

52 Gram 
counter- 
part 

53 Vegan's 
no-no 



DOWN 

1 Fliers 
O.H.M.S 

2 Rlghl 
angle 

3 Candle 
count 

4 Most 
updaled 

5 Comedian 
Jay 

6 Compass 
dir. 

Boreal 
12- 
member 
band 

9 Deserve 

10 Carpet 
type 

11 Tooth 
paste 
holder 

16 Neely ol 
hockey 
lame 

20 Douses 



7 
8 



Solution tlnw: 


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¥««l>rd*y's •n*¥nr 



21 Unes- 
corted 

22 TvKOSOfTK 

23 Pinnacle 

24 Trap- 
shooting 
variation 

25 Longtime 
sports- 
caster 
Chris 

27 Pile 

28 Sea 
eagle 

29 Fill till 
full 

31 Cold War 
weapon 
(Abbr) 

34 Mocks 

35 Online 
pic trans- 
miller 

37 Hisloric 
boy king 

38 Venom- 
ous 
vipers 

39 Beetiive 
State 

40 Melody 

41 Take 
oul of 
context? 

44 Victory 
sign 

45 Shade 

46 Greek 
vowel 

47 Morse 
morsel 



FILL IN THE BLANK 



Your take on an Aademy Awards acceptance speech 



What an honor. What an honor. I feel so 



to be receiving this award. This film was a/an 



WilCIIVt »■>««"« 

forward for mankind. I just want to thank everyone who helped get me here: my mother, 



NOUN 



my friends - everyone. Ha, and so many said it couldn't be done, They were 



. wrong. 



for being my partner in crime. Your 



AtlltlBUIf 



and my . 



ADVERB PfRSONNOJ 

work oh*so well together. 



PUSON NO^ 1 

J thanks 



AtmiBUTE 



By Donnie Lee 



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The blotter | Arrests in Riley County 



( RVI'IOQIIP 

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Reports are tak^n dirKtly from the Riley County Poike 
Department's dally logs. The Collegian does not list wheel 
locks or minor traffic violations because of space con- 
straints. 

Friday, Feb. 23 

■ Curtis Alan Bolingcr, no address given, at 
8:25 a.m. for worthtess check. Bond was $178.28. 

■ Irina Leonidorna Frew, Clay Center, Kan., at 
8:45 a.m. for driving with a suspended or can- 
celled license. Bonawas $500, 

■ Aaron Keith Cooper, Milford, Kai>., at 9:38 
a.m. for driving with a suspended or cancelled 
license. Bond was $500. 

■ Jamie Ray Mclnteer, 614 Kearney St., at 2 
p.m. for failure to appear. No bond was set. 

■ Paul Garcia Villarreal Jr.. fort Riley, at 4:40 
p.m. for failure to appear Bond was $2000. 

■ Eddy Dean McDowell, Frankfort, Kan, at 6 
p.m. for criminal use of a weapon and driving 
with a suspended or cancelled license. Bond was 

Siooo. 

■ Joy Lynn Presley, St. George, Kan., at 10 p.m. 

for worthless check. Bond was $i68. 

■ Matthew Joseph Rodriguei, 8636 Josie Lane, 
at 11:50 p.m. for purchase o7 alcohol by a minor, 
reckless arivinq and driving under the influence. 
Bond was $750. 

Saturday, Feb. 24 

■ William Lee Grimm, 2114Northview Drive, 
at 12:09 a.m. for driving with a suspended or 
cancelled license. 6ond was $500. 

■ Adam Wayne Morris, Douglass, Kan., at 12:10 
a.m. for battery. Bond was $500. 

■ Jonathon Richard Seay, 1026 Osage St., Apt. 
6, at 1:45 a.m. for disorderly conduct, bond was 
$750, 

■ Amanda R. Love, Durant, Okla., at 1:57 a.m. 
for driving under the influence. Bond was SSOO. 

■ Shawn Manteo Dixson, Fort Riley, at 2 a.m 
for tewd and lascivious behavior, obstruction of 
the legal process and disorderly conduct. Bond 
was $ i,S()0. 



■ Michael Scott Struble, Mulvane, Kan., at 2 
a.tn. for aggravated battery. Bond was 52,000, 

■ Justin Lee Merrltt, Onaga, Kan., at 3 a.m. for 
failure to appear. No bond was set. 

■ Joshua Lawrence Liotta, 2401 Woodway 
Drive, Apt. J, at 3:18 a.m. for driving under the 
influence. Bond was S750. 

■ Fredrick Derell Swinson, 730 Allen Rd., Apt. 
70, at 8 am. for failure to appear. Bond was $750. 

■ David Lee Huffman, Ogoen, Kan., at 5 p.m. 
for battery. Bond was S500. 

■ Tvson Dean Ratts, 2305 Butternut Lane, at 
7:10 p.m. for battery and intimidation of a wit- 
ness. Bond was $1,000, 

Sunday, Feb. 25 

■ Michael Paul Soderlund, 415 N. 16th St„ Apt. 
5, at 12:17 a.m. for resisting arrest and criminal 

trespass. Bond was $1,500, 

■ Hui Suit Jacobs. Junction City, at 12:37 a.m. 
for driving under the influence. Bond was $500. 

■ Jeremey Allan Meyer, Bellvue, Neb., at 1:58 
a.m, for driving under the influence. Bond was 
$750, 

■ Daniel Harold Harrison, Fort Myers, Fla,, at 
2 a.m. for battery, criminal damage to property, 
aggravated false impersonation, and six charges 
or failure to appear. Bond was $36 000. 

B Joshua Edward Campa, 1026 Bertrand St., 
Apt, A, at 2:30 a.m for arivinq under the influ- 
ence. Bond was S7S0. 

■Jennifer Nicole Vanschoelandt, 1220 Centen- 
nial Drive, Apt. 3, at 3:27 a.m, for driving under 
the influence. Bond was $750. 

■ David William Ramlow, 2912 Karen Terrace, 
at 4:20 a.m. for driving under the influence. Bond 
was 51,500, 

■ Jamie Ray Mclnteer, 614 Kearney St„ at 10:20 
a.m. for worthless check. Bond was $315.67. 

■ Eddie Evans Lafayette Pittman, 727 Griffith 
Drive, at 2:45 p.m. for two counts of failure to 
appear. Bond was $2,000, 

■ Melvin Tyrece Kirk, Lexington, Neb., at 1 1 :40 
p.m. for driving with a suspended or cancelled 
license. Bond was $2,250. 



The planner 

Campus bulletin board 

■ Tlic Jif sntif ApprKiation AsMcla- 
titn trtll mtftat 7 p.m. Wednesday In 
Union 203. 

It«m In the calendar can be publlttied 
up to three times. To place »n item in the 
Campus Calendar, stop by Kedzie 116 and 
fill out 4 form oi e-mail the nevifs editor 
alcoiiegian^'spub.iisu.eduby 11 a.m. two 
days btimi it is to run. 



Corrections and 
clarifications 

Thwe was an trrni in Monday's Coll*q(an. 
Teny Wart Is a friend of Levi Flory. Ihe Col- 
le^ianrtgiftstheerror. Ifyoti^etsoimthinq 
that shouM be coneded, call n«ws RJitor 
Alex Peak at (785) 532-65S6 or e-mail co/- 
kgmn&ipubkw.tdu. 



Kansas State Collegian 

(USPS 291 020) The Kansas State Col- 
legian, a student newspaper at Kansas 
State (Jniversity, is published by Student 
Publications Inc., Mi\t lOi, Manhat- 
tan, KS 66S06. The Collegian is published 
weekdays during the school year and 
on Wednesdays duf ing the summer. 
Periodical postage is paid at Manhattan, 
KS 66S02. POSTMASTtR: Send addtess 
changes to Kansas State Collegian, 
circulation desk. Ked»e 103, Manhattan, 
KS66S06-7167. 
O Kansas State Collegian, 2007 




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Tuesday, Feb. 27, 2007 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 3 



Documentaries, publications 
showcase teacher's knowledge 



SyKlMnHodgM 

The Dutch have an ongoing 
joke ihey say divides the people 
in their villages: there are those 
wKo never travel anywhere, and 
a small number o{ people who 
can be found around the world. 

Harald EL Prins, disUn 
guished professor of anthropol- 
ogy, falls into the latter catego 
ry 

Bom and raised in the Neth- 
erlands, Prins teaches anthro 
pology at K-State. However, his 
jiiuniey to Kansas was no one- 
slop trip. 

In ftins' office, a number 
of artifacts tell the stories of 
his world-wide journeys; a rug 
made in Guatemala covere his 
desk, a mask from Nepal haitgs 
on the wall, and reels of film 
line his shelves. 

"If you really start search 
ing. you can find more," he said, 
"but it's nothing compared to 
my home." 

f^is has worked in numer- 
ous countries and has studied 
anthropology, archaeology, 
compardtivc history and 16 nun 
Filmmaking 

In addition to his adven- 
tures, Prins has more than 100 
publications, an international 
hlmmaking award, and numer- 
ous documentaries. He has won 
a number of leaching awards, 
including University Distin 
guished Professor at K-State in 



2005 and Kansas Professor of 
the Year in 2006 

Betsy Cauble, head of the 
Department of Sociology, An 
thropology and Social Work, 
said membei^ of the depart- 
ment nominated Prins to be a 
distinguished professor because 
of his scholarship and teaching, 

"He's a very special person 
to have here, and he is also 
consistently bringing an inter- 
national perspective to K-State," 
she said 'He has made K-State 
visible in places where we 
would not have normally been 
well known." 

Prins said he enjoyed en- 
couraging students from small 
towns to travel if that's what 
they want to do. 

"It's a real joy to make that 
dream and then put reality into 
their dream and say, 'OK what's 
stopping you? Stop dreaming, 
and put your dream into ac 
tion,'" he said. 

Sarah Kruse, sophomore in 
hotel and restaurant manage- 
ment, said she took Prins' intro- 
duction to cultural anthropol- 
ogy class. 

"You can tell that he is pas- 
sionate about his work,' she 
said. "He knows a lot about 
certain areas from his personal 
experiences." 

Prins said he considers his 
greatest accomplishment to 
be his involvement with the 
Aroostook Band of Mi'kmaqs 
in Maine, a regional culture that 



was once poverty-stricken and 
landle^. 

Prim said he became the di- 
rector of research and develop- 
ment for the group and helped 
it form the Aroostook Mi'kmaq 
Council With the help of his re- 
search, documentary and publi- 
cations, the federal government 
later recognized the council 
as an Indian tribe, making the 
group eligible for federal servic- 
es and assistance. Tlie govern- 
ment also granted them 5,000 
acres of reservation land. 

Throughout the process. 
Prins also served as an expert 
witness for the tribe in front of 
the US Senate. 

"[ look back on my work, 
and, yes. there are good big 
books," he said, "but what I re- 
ally believe is that to have been 
able to be an instrumental fac- 
tor in improving the lives of an 
entire commimity is something 
that 1 really thmk, when 1 go to 
my grave, that will be the best 
contribution I've made." 

Prins also has worked in the 
Middle East on banana planta- 
tions and archeological excava- 
tions, and has spent much of his 
time doing fieldwork in North 
and South America 

"Much of what has driven 
me, I guess, is really a sense of 
adventure and a sense of getting 
oH of the beaten trail," he said. 
"If I knew other people were 
going there as a tourist desti- 
nation, 1 would probably stay 




LyndMy Bom | (OllEUAN 
HaraM E.L Prins, (llstlngulsh»d profassor of anthrapology, has travttad to numerous countries 
studying anthropology, arctweology, comparative history and 16 mm fllmniaklng. 



away. So, no Cancun, (Mex.), 
for me ' 

Throughout his studies. 
Prins has created documenta- 
ries showcasing his knowledge. 
He said he was trained (o use 
16 mm film cameras when he 
attended film school in New 
York. 

"In my mind, it was really to 
learn another language, a visual 
language, and how to tell a sto- 
ry,' he said 'If I could translate 
my knowledge in a form of a 
film, then I could reach so many 
more people who would never 
pick up a book or never pick up 
a journal article." 

New York also is where Prins 
met his wife, Burmy McBride, a 
writer, author and an adjunct 
faculty member at K-State. 

"I'm very lucky that I ran into 



her in 1979." he said. "It was, as 
they say, love at first sight." 

Prins said he and his wife 
have been partners and co-au- 
thors for different publicatiorts 
and projects. 

Most of Prins' work sur- 
rounds indigenous people, and 
he said his passion staried when 
he was 8 years old and fascinat- 
ed with American Indians 

"I didn't know the different 
tribes spoke different languages. 
but every time I saw statements 
made in books, I wrote it down 
and memorized it, and then I 
would speak the language when 
playing with friends," he said, 

Prins said he grew up ad- 
miring people who were al- 
ways traveling, including his 
father, A.H.J. Prins. a Dutch 
anthropologist; his godfather 



Harold E Lamberi, a British 
anthropologist after whom he is 
named; and his neighbor |ohan 
Fabric ius, a well-known Dutch 
writer 

"There have been people that 
I have admired, not so much as 
role models but beacons, show- 
ing me what they had done and 
what they had not done,"' he 
said. 

Next fall, Prins will be on 
sabbatical He said he wants to 
visit the research sites where his 
father and godfather worked 

IMns also is a co-principal 
investigator with McBride in a 
National Parks Service ethno- 
graphic research project and a 
guest co-curator for an exhibit 
at the Smithsonian Institution 
National Muwuni of Natural 
Histo^. 



Accomplished concert pianist fronfi Costa Rica performs at Hale Library 




Chrlttophar HanawtnclMl | CdUEGlAN 
Costs Rkan pianist ManutI Matarrita performs to a crowd gathered in the Hale Library Hemisphere room 
Monday everting. The Costa Rican Student Association sponsored Matarrita's performance. 



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All available seats were 
filled for a performance Mon- 
day night by a renowned Cos- 
ta Rican pianist. 

Manuel Matarrita played 
several piano pieces from 
Spain and Latin America in 
the Hemisphere Room at Hale 
Library. He said he tried to 
present a different style of pi- 
ano performance to the crowd 
because most people do not 
know the music unless Ihey 
are raised in that culture. 

"I'm offering them music 
they don't know,'* he said. 
"I'm bringing Latin American 
music from Latin America." 

The Costa Rican Student 
Association sponsored the 
event. Lorena Barboza, presi- 
dent of the association and 
Spanish professor, said this is 



the biggest event the group has 
sponsored in several years 

"The Costa Ricans are very 
pleased to have a distinguished 
pianist like Dr. Matarrita be- 
cause he has a good reputation 
as a pianist," she said. "We are 
very pleased, very honored to 
have him here." 

Barboza said the idea 
of Matarrita performing at 
K-State arose when Norman - 
Armando Gamboa, director of 
orchestras at Washburn Uni- 
versity, contacted her a few 
months ago Matanita was 
visiting Washburn to perform 
and teach with the orchestra 
and Gamboa said he called 
Barboza so other areas in 
Kansas could view Matarrita's 
abilities. 

"It gives great exposure to 
the students," he said "They 
never get this type of musical 
exposure" 



More people than expected 
showed up to the event, and 
the association had to bring 
in extra chairs to accomodate 
the extra viewers The packed 
crowd applauded after every 
piece and gave Matarrita a 
standing ovation after his final 
piece from his home country 
of Costa Rica. 

"1 enjoyed it," said Brian 
Geiger. senior in civil engi- 
neering "It's nice to hear live 
music for once and it's not 
music you hear around cam- 
pus all the lime." 

Barboza said the Costa Ri- 
can students are lucky to have 
the opportunity to have a per- 
former like Matarrita come to 
K-State. 

"We would like to do more 
events like this in the future 
because wc want to show our 
talent with special guests like 
Dr Matarrita," she said 



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OPINION 



Page 4 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Tuesday, Feb. 27, 2007 



Online voting technology leaves would-be-voters out of excuses 



You have no excuse not to 
vote in the Student Body Pres- 
idential and Vice presidential 
primary elec- 

tion, which editorial selected 

■itflHs at 8 ^"'^ debated by 

sians ai o j,^^ editorial board 

a.m. today. ^'^^ written after a 

majority opinion 1$ 

For Start- formed. This 1$ the 

ere, you have ^Sf"'"^"" 
a 36-hour 

window in which to cast your 
ballot. That's more than two 



weeks' worth of class periods 
for the average student, so it 
shouldn't be a challenge to 
find a few spare minutes. 

Second, you don't have to 
go anywhere special or wait in 
a line to do it fust direct your 
Web browser to sgaelections. 
ksu.edu and log in with the 
same elD and password you 
use to enroll or check your K- 
State Webmail. 



Third, you just click the box 
next to the pair you want to 
see run in the general elec- 
tion. You've seen their signs, 
T-shirts, banners, cards, cups 
and tables in the Union, right? 
It's not tike they've been in 
hiding the past few weeks. 

Just pick the one you want. 
It's so simple, a Jayhawk could 
doit 

On top of all that remem- 



ber this election affects your 
future, and it is your respon- 
sibility as a student to make 
a good choice for the univer- 
sity's sake. The pair that wins 
the presidency will set the 
course for the student body 
and represent the university to 
the state, not to mention the 
nation. 

So hurry up and vote. What 
are you waiting for? 



Tax cuts help 



BRETT 
KING 



Every year on April 15, Ameri- 
cans are required to give > large 
portion of their income, which will 
b« spent on liberaJ, 
bleeding-heart so- 
cial programs, back 
to the government. 
Since the imple- 
mentation of the 
Bush tax cuts in 
2001, we have had 
to give less, which 
bothers those who 

feel we should be __ _ 

giving more. 

These tax cuts have spurred 
economic growth for this country 
and increased government revenue 
But voices from the left, sounding 
like a broken record, make state- 
ments that tax cuts are only for the 
wealthiest one percent and neglect 
the lower class and working poor. 

While Americans are burning 
the midnight oil to stay awake, 
those who believe in large govern- 
ment have images of W-2s. W-4, 
1040s, 1099s and 4868s dancing in 
their heads. 

Those who believe the nation 
cannot function without the in- 
come tax should understand the tax 
was not instilled until 1913, with 
the 16th Amendment, 

Since then, Americans have 
been subject to a progressive in- 
come tax 

The 201)1 tax-cut package, which 
democrats are opposed to extend- 
ing, has increased the Earned 
Income Tax Credit This tax credit 
allows working poor families to 
receive a larger refund from the 
government when Uncle Sam 
comes knocking 

The amount received from the 
tax credit is a function of a person's 
"earned income," which consist of 
wages, tips, salaries and net earn- 
ings from a self-employed business. 

A family with two kids, making 



lew than $36,348, could 
be eligible for up to 
$4,536 

Kansas even has its 
own EITC tax credit 
program, which the ad- 
ministration of former 
Republican Gov. Bill 
Graves started in 
1998 

Former Attorney General 
Phill Kline led the charge for 
the creation of the EITC in 
Kansas when a he served as a 
representative in the Kansas 
House and chairman of the 
taxation committee. 

Many lower-income 
families cannot 
afford to have 
their 




taxes done professionally, so they 
miss important deductions and 
refunds 

According to the general ac- 
counting office of the Internal 
Revenue Service, IS to 25 percent 
of those qualifying for the EITC do 
not claim the credit on their tax 
forms. On average, 3.5 to 7 million 
American households are ne^ect* 
ing to claim at least $6.5 to S12 
billion in refunds, which would be 
an average refund of $ 1 .766 per 
household. 

For lower-income families strug- 
^ing to figure out our monstrous 
tax code while living paycheck to 



paycheck, organizations such as the 
United Way can help by providing 
tax preparation services. 

Those who qualify tor the EITC 
have the opportunity to receive 
money quicker than ever 

The IRS has enacted a new pro- 
gram allowing Americans to receive 
income tax returns through direct 
deposit. 

The new direct deposit system is 
very similar to the Social Security 
program, saving money on both the 
printing and mailing of checks. 

For those receiving a tax return, 
the money is accessible in their 
account within 10 to 14 days after 



IlltutriUon l>y [>onnla Lm | COU.KIAN 

being proce^ed. The turnaround 
for this new system can be up to 
two months quicker. 

The call to repeal Bush's tax cuts 
will not just be a repeal on tax cuts 
for the rich Withdraw of these tax 
cuts will hurt struggling families. 

Two to four thousand dollars 
can be extremely helpful to lower- 
income families struggling to make 
ends meet. These tax cuts are not 
)ust beneflcial to the wealthy, but 
even those who struggle to get by. 



Srett King n t Junior In political tcttiKt. n<«t 
lertd (omnwntf to opinloiii<i>tpub.lau.tdu. 



k LOLLEGIAN 



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Jicqut Hug | (0 (W* CHriF 

Jvul Hifrundti | TO fmCHIEF 

Login C. AdMnt | MiriH) FCHIM 

L*t*y 0. MKlwy i FtAtURES tmlOB 

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trwtdin Pratgti | PKEVFUltligk F»IT(M 

Royc* Hiyn« \ (IMIUFFEMTOFI 

Oonnt* LM I F'liH(ll EMFOn 

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WRITE TO US 

letim an b« subFtiFtt^d by email to tfttenf^yH^. 
ksu.e^u, or in person to Kedzie 1 16 PledW intlud* 
your full mmf, ^dr in sthool ^nd mafor. letters 
ihould i>e limrted to 250 words. All submitted l«tten 
may bt «dit«d for length ind clarity. 



CONTACT US 

Kansas State Collegian 
Kedzie 101 Manhattan, KS 665U 

Oiipl4y*ds (7gS|5]MS60 

CU»l6ed»di..(78S)SJ2-6SSS 

Mhrery (7eS)S«-6SSS 

Newstoom (785)S32-6S« 

nem^ipiib.kui.edu 

ONLINE: ^ 

In the campus pmld»)t4l eietHon, wtikh 
nymr lo you? Wngh in M lisuatalltgiM.<m. 



STREET TALK 



What do you think of your handwritingi 





'Kind of lik« I emptied 
an ink bottle and put it 
on paper' 

ttortnl S«rangapanl 

CR«DU«T[ STUDENT IN 

mumam 



"Very good.' 

Sandra Agudalo 

GRADUAUSEUDtNIlN 
CHEHItM (HGm([RING 



/. 









V 00€r 



Jite loz^ cA 



7 



^ 




'tt'itefrible.' 

AiKlrtw Stonnar 

lUKiOHiNFTODiCltNCf 
«NOINDUSERV 






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"Not wry jood.* 

Cj.Mar 

'.OPHOMOREINItOWMiCS 







Area leaders 
should see 
PFLAG play 

Imagine, if you will, being com- 
pletely removed from everyone you 
know and love because you tell 
them you are gay. 

PeiionaUy, I 
cant imagine it, 
becauM although 
I am bisexuai, my 
mother and father 
ftiU love m« un- 
conditionally. 

Sometimea I LOLA 

think 1 confuH SHRIMPLIN : 

my father, but • . 

that's another matter altogether. 

My family life supportive. 1 am 
convinced my grandmother would 
defend me to the end, even if I went 
on a murder spree down Poyntz 
Avenue. 

She would lay I had a reason. 

And Larry Fry, pastor of College 
Avenue United Methodist Church, 
would come visit me in jail. 

Yet, there are people who risk ev- 
erything when they tell their families 
and churches they are homosexual, 
bisexual or transgendered. 

That issue will be addressed on 
the (tage at 7 p.m. March 9 and 10 
and 2 p.m. March 10 and 11 at the 
Manahttan Arts Center. 

The play "You Belong Tb Us" . 
presents first-hand dialogue from 
parents of lesbian, bisexual, gay and 
trtnigendered people who discuss 
tiie ftntggle some parents have with 
the knowledge their children are not 
heterosexual. 

Coming out to your parents ts 
hard, and dealing with children who 
admit they are LGBT would be just 
as difficult. 

Luckily, the Flint Hills Chapter 
of Parents, Family and Friends of 
Lesbians and Gays brought this 
dialogue to Manhattan 

The group facilitated a discussion' 
with area pastors at a luncheon last 
week, and Fry said those who went 
were very supportive. 

Those attending were allowed to 
hear part of the play, and Pry said 
he felt it was beneficial for not only 
religious leaders to see, but also for 
the public. 

"I think it would be a very helpful 
play for anyone to see," Fry said. 

Leaders from the campus min- 
istry, Ogden Friendship House, the 
Hrst Con^pregational church and 
the Manhattan Jewish Congregation 
attended the luncheon in addition to 
his own church, Pry said. 

No one there dissented or had 
questions about the play. That's sad. 

TTiis play is supposed to foster 
discussion and support a healing 
atmosphere for people who need 
it most While Manhattan has a 
plethora of churches, only a few 
reach out to embrace people in crisis 
and who face discrimination 

1 understand some churches dis- 
agree with homosexuality on moral 
grounds, but 1 would think the need 
for Christ's forgiveness and love 
would take precedence over unrea- 
soning bias. 

It doesn't surprise me that Larry 
Fry and a few other pastoi^ attended, 
the luncheon. - 

College Avenue United Method- '* 
ist Church and Ogden Friendship 
House apparently preach inclusion 
of everyone, as do the Manhattan 
Jewish Congregation and Fii^t Con- 
gregational Church. 

But something this important, 
something that talks about an event 
that could change someone's life so 
completely, should be attended by 
more than just a few pastors and 
religious leaders 

This is an important play, not just 
for those who are struggling with the 
issue of coming out to their family, 
or their family's struggle to cope 
with the knowledge. 

Those church leaders who didnt 
take advantage of the opportunity to 
attend the luncheon should attend 
the play itself. 



Lata Shrtmplln ti a imlof In )awiwllim and mats 
wnnumkattom. Mmm iMtd yoyt cwnmtntj » 



Tuesday, Feb. 27, 2007 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGtAN 



Pages 



WORLD NEWS 




CANADA ANNOUNCES 
NEW AID PACKAGE 
FOR AFGHANISTAN 

TORONTO - Prime Min- 
ister Stephen Harper an- 
nounced a new $172 million 
reconstruction aid package 
for Alghanistan on Monday, 
heeding opposition lawmak- 
ers' calls for Canada to focus 
more on development projects 
in the country. 

The new funding, to be dis- 
bursed this year and next, will 
go toward five different areas: 
governance and development, 
counter-narcotics, policing, 
de- mining and road construc- 
tion. 

The funding is in addition 
to $860 million Canada has al- 
ready pledged for reconstruc- 
tion. 



BOMB ALMOST HITS 
IRAQI VICE PRESIDENT 
IN SECURITY LAPSE 

BAGHDAD, Iraq - He 
came to praise workere who 
believe better days are ahead 
for Iraq. Then he watched 
helplessly as some people he 
knew lay mortally wounded 
and others staggered about in 
agony and disbelief 

Somehow a bomb was 
smuggled into a place where 
the security should be airtight: 
a government building ringed 
by Iraqi police for a visit by the 
Shiite Vice President Adel Ab- 
dul-Mahdi. 

But the message was still 
chilling: that suspected Sunni 
militants can strike anywhere 
d^pite a major security crack- 
down across Baghdad. 



BOOK LOOKS AT SECRET 
POLICE PENETRATION 
OF POLISH CHURCH 

WARSAW, Poland - A book 
titled "Priests In The Face Of 
The Security Services," released 
Monday, dredged up more pain- 
ful allegations from Poland's 
Communist era, naming some 
30 Homan CathoUc priests, in- 
cluding several bishops, as reg- 
istered informants with the se- 
cret police. 

The author, the Rev. I^eusz 
Isakowicz-Zaleski. was twice 
brutally beaten by the secret po- 
Ike and b one of the leaders of a 
drive to expose clergf who sup- 
plied inf Donation to authorities. 
The church, he says, must con- 
fess and repent to heal wounds. 

— Tbt Astodstcd PrHt 



Challenge course set to open 
near beginning of June 



•y Eric Davit 

KANSAS STATE COlttCIMt 

A new challenge course in 
the works might include wire 
zip lines and cargo nets that 
allow participants to climb 
and act through various sce- 
narios. 

For the past few months, 
many people have worked 
to bring such a course to K- 
State students and Manhat- 
tan residents. 

The course will be north 
of the K-State Child Develop- 
ment Center, which is located 
in the jardine Complex, and 
is set to open near the begin- 
ning of June this year. 

Tim Stoecklein, interim 
challenge course coordinator 
and assistant director of rec- 
reational services at Peters 
Recreation Complex, said the 
protect still is in the planning 
phase at this point. Stoeck- 
lein also said one of the most 
difficult parts of the planning 
process is deciding what ele- 
ments to put in the course. 

"We want to offer some- 
thing in our challenge course 
that other courses in the area 



cannot offer," Stoecklein 
said. 

A typical challenge course 
offers both high and low ar- 
eas for the participants to 
climb, Stoecklein said. 

He also said the planning 
group wants lo find different 
ways to approach familiar el- 
ements of the couree as well 
as introduce new and differ- 
ent elements. 

llie planning process al- 
ready has begun, and orga- 
nizers are waiting for a con- 
tractor to accept the bid to 
build the course. 

Once the groundwork is 
done, Stoecklein said the in- 
stallation will not take very 
long, relative to other con- 
struction projects. 

Emily Lehning, assistant 
dean of new student ser- 
vices, also is working on the 
project. She said the plan- 
ning group received approxi- 
mately $200,000 to build the 
course. 

Lehning said the plan- 
ning group initially requested 
$115,000, which the uni- 
versity allocated. The Stu- 
dent Governing Association 



contributed $85,000 to help 
keep the operating cost of 
the course down. 

There will be a fixed fee 
to use the coune, with dis- 
counts for students and cam- 
pus-related groups. 

"We have a community 
meeting scheduled for March 
28 from 3 to 5 p.m where we 
will have a formal presenta- 
tion, and after that we wUl 
have the plans the consul- 
tants gave us," L«hning said. 

The goal of the meeting 
will be for people from the 
community to come in and 
see the progr^s, Lehning 
said. 

Students around cam- 
pus expressed mixed reac- 
tions to the introduction of 
a challenge course. \Vhile 
some were excited about the 
course, other students were 
more reserved, including 
Kent Bumham, graduate stu- 
dent in landscape architec- 
ture. 

"1 would have to say it 
sounds like a lot of fun," he 
said, "but I would need to see 
more of a purpose for having 
one at Kansas State." 



South Korean author 
says he will change 
'anti-Semitic' comic 



THEASSOOATEOPOESS 

SEOUL, South Korea 
- The author of a best-selling 
comic book series intended 
to teach children about other 
countries said Monday he 
would change a chapter on 
)ews that has been called anti- 
Semitic and similar to Nazi 
propaganda. 

Rhie Won-bok maintained, 
however, that his depiction of 
Jewish control of American 
media and politics was based 
on fact and "commonly be- 
lieved." 

"The lews are the invinble 
force that controb the US," 
Rhie, a professor of visual arts 
at Duksung Women's Univer- 
sity in Seoul, told The Associ- 
ated F¥ess. "I wrote the chap- 
ter to let people know that 
you can't understand the U.S. 
without knowing the fewish 
community." 

More than 10 million cop- 
ies from the 12-book series 
titled "Meon Nara. Vlwoot 
Naia," or "Par Countries, Near 
Countries," have been sold 
since it was hrst published in 
1987 

The comics, with playfully 
drawn figures have sought lo 
explain European countries, 
the U.S., Japan and even Ko- 
rea itself 

The first volume of three 
focusing on the United States 



was published in 2004 In a 
chapter titled "You have to 
know the Jews to see the U.S.," 
Rhie takes a wide-ranging look 
at Jewish history. 

Although noting that Jews 
have faced prejudice for many 
centuries, the book takes a 
more sinister view of their role 
in the United States. 

Rhie said the Sept. 11 at- 
t^ks occurred because of 
Arab tenorists' hatred for 
the United States he blamed 
on Jews, who "move the U.S. 
in the way they want using 
money and the media as their 
weapon." 

The book also says Kore- 
an-Americans are diligent and 
successful in the U.S. "but in 
the end, always run into the 
wall called the Jews." 

Images from the book 
"echo classic Nazi canards," 
Rabbi Abraham Cooper of the 
Los Angeles-based Simon Wi- 
esenthal Center said in a state- 
ment eariier this month In a 
letter sent to the publishers, 
Cboper urged them to review 
"the slanders in this book." 

Rhie asserted he is "not 
at all anti-Semitic" and that 
he would remove the parts 
that have drawn offense or 
write them differently 'The 
last thing I want is a conflict 
between the Koreans and the 
Jews because of my book," he 
said. 



Facebook.com founder faced with option to sell 



Campus Phone Books 



THE ASSOCIATID PRESS 

PALO ALTO, California 
- As Facebook.com's master- 
mind, Mark Zuckerberg is sit- 
ting on a potential gold mine 
that could make him the next 
Silicon Valley whiz kid lo 
strike it rich. 

But the 22-year-old found- 
er of the Internet's second 
largest social-networking site 
also could turn into the next 
poster boy for missed oppor- 
tunities if he waits too long 
to cash in on Facebook Inc., 
which is expected to generate 
revenue of more than $100 
million this year. 

The bright outlook is one 
reason Zuckerberg felt justi- 
fied spurning several takeover 
bids last year, including a $1 
billion offer from Yahoo Inc 

"We clearly have a bias to- 
ward building than selling," 
Zuckerberg said in a recent 
interview. "We think there is 
a lot more to unlock here." 

The build-or-selj dilemma 
Zuckerberg faces is becom- 
ing more common among the 
precocious entrepreneurs im- 
mersed in the latest Internet 
craze, a communal concept of 
con tent -sharing that has been 
dubbed Web 2.0." 

Besides Pacebook, other 
Web 2 startups frequently 
mentioned as prime take- 
over targets include online 
video site Metacafe Inc and 
Photobucket Inc., which has 
emerged as one of the Inter- 
net's busiest destinations by 
hosting personal videos and 
photos that routinely are 



On sale in Kedzie 103 
8 am. to 5 p.m. Mon.-Fri 




@[fQ(§© 8m (3 



•ngagcmtnta 
and wtdrfififlf 



in the 

Collegian, 

the first friday 
of the month. 



. 1 



-Notice- 



Car Clinic 



is moving to 



'S 



*^ <:^oto% Unn, Una. 

At 209 Sarber Lane 

After 42 years of faithful service, our 
community's friend Dave Ekart is retiring. 
Under this new merge, the businesses will be 
jointly named Car Clinic, Inc. 

Due to downtown redevelopment, the 
business wiU be closed on March 1-2 and 
relocate to: 209 Sarber Lane. 

Car Clinic, Inc. will re- open Monday, March 
5th at 7:30 AM. To know more, call 539- 1040. 



f^ ^^H 



tUK Xtpilt 



linked to top social-network- 
ing sites like MySpace.com 
and Facebook. 

These sites' operators find 
themselves at a critical junc- 
ture reached several years ago 
by the Intemet's first big so- 
cial-networking site, Pritnd- 
ster.com, which chose to stay 
independent instead of selling. 
That decision is now regarded 
as one of Silicon Valley's big- 
gest blunders. 

Web 2 startups have 
emerged as hot commodi- 
ties because they are draw- 
ing more people away from 
television, newspapers and 
other media traditionally used 
for advertising. Online video 
channels and social networks, 
a catch-all phrase attached to 
sites that enable people with 
common interests to connect 
and deepen Iheir bonds, are 
particularly hot. 

Deep-pocketed companies 
are now angling for a piece of 
the Web 2 action - a quest 
that already has yielded a 
couple big jackpots, helping 
to propel the sales prices of 
startups to their highest levels 
since the dot-com boom. 

News Corp paid $580 mil- 
lion in 2005 to buy MySpacc, 
the largest social-networking 
site, and Google Inc. snapped 
up video sharing pioneer Vou- 
Tube Inc. for $1 76 billion late 
last year. 

"I'm surprised a lot more 
companies haven't already 
been bought," said Reid Hoff 
man, a veteran Silicon Valley 
executive who has invested 
in many startups, including 



Facebook. "My hunch is the 
deals are only going to get 
more expensive in 2008 and 
2009" 

In 2006, the average price 
paid for a startup funded by 
venture capitalists rose 19 
percent to $114 million. That 
was the highest amount since 
the dot-com frenzy of 2000 
when the average price of ven- 
ture-backed startups peaked 
at $337 million, according lo 
data from Thomson Finan- 
cial and the National Venture 
Capital Association. 

If the dealmaking market 
continues to heat up, Zucker- 
berg will end up looking smart 
for rebuffing Yahoo and other 
suiton that included Micro- 
soft Corp and Viacom Inc. 

Assuming Facebook hits 
its financial targets, the Palo 
Alto-based company should 
be able to command a sales 
price well above $1 billion or 
pursue an even more lucrative 
initial public offering of stock 
in the tradition of Google, 
Yahoo Inc., eBay Inc. and 
Amazon.com Inc. - a group 
of Internet icons now worth a 
combined S250 billion. 

A Facebook sale or IPO 
is bound to happen eventu- 
ally so the startup's early in- 
vestors, consisting mostly of 
venture capitalists, can real- 
ize some profits Facebook 
has raised about $36 5 million 
since Zuckerberg started the 
site in 2004 while he was still 
a sophomore at Harvard Uni- 
versity. Zuckerberg has some 
flexibility in deciding when to 
cash out, because Facebook 



already is profitable. 

An IPO or sale will "make 
sense at some point for the 
company, but I never think 
that's the goal," said Zucker- 
berg, who is believed to con- 
trol nearly one-third of Face- 
book's stock. "The goal is to ... 
continue introducing certain 
revolutionary products that 
push us to the next level." 

Marc Andreessen, who 
made a fortune during his 20s 
as co-founder of Web browser 
pioneer Netscape Communi- 
cations, is among those who 
believe Facebook is going to 
become even more valuable 
during the next year or two. 

"Facebook is doing the 
smart thing. If you are in a big 
market like social networking, 
you are usually better off wait- 
ing (to sell)," said Andreessen, 
who is now chief technology 
officer for another social-net- 
working startup, Ning Inc. 
Had MySpace remained in- 
dependent, it would probably 
be worth $5 billion now, An- 
dreessen estimated. 

Should Facebook stumble, 
it may some day be suffer- 
ing the same pangs of regret 
tormenting Friendster Inc., 
which tumed down a take- 
over bid from Google in 2003 
when it reigned as Intemet's 
hottest social -networking site. 

Had that offer been ac- 
cepted, Friendster founder 
Jonathan Abrams and a small 
group of early investors re- 
portedly would have received 
$30 million in Google stock 
that would have been worth 
about $1 billion today 



T 



Union Program 
Council %c 



Tuesday, February 27 



Real Women, Real Curv^ 

CD-sponsored with SNAG. 

Main Ball room, second floor • 7 - 8 pm 



Friday, March 2 



Film: Inh&n the Wlna- Little Theatre, first floor • 8 pm, $1 
Also showing: Saturday, March 3 » 7 & 9:30 pm, $1 
Sunday, March 4 • 8 pm, $1 
After Hours: Comedian Arvln Mitchell 

Union Courtyard, ground floor • 10-U pm, free!! 



Want to get involved with UPC? 



Applications for UPC Executive Board available online or in the 
UPC office. Due March 7, 



How much would you pay to see Dane Cook? 




Take an online survey at www.k-state.edu/upc. 
Student photography contest exhibit, February 19-27. 






301 K StJtc lludfnt Urvion UP( ptione 532 6Sn www k itJtP P(!u up( 



Page 6 




Weiser better 
than we give 
him credit for 



If you were like me, you probably 
weren't amused by the way Athletici 
Director Tim Weiser handled the fir- 
ing of former coach f— 
Jim Wooldridge lait 
year 

Maybe you ques- 
tioned his char 
actcr, wondering 
how he could fire 
Wooldridge - the 
ultimate Mr Nice JEFFREY 

Guy - just minutes RAKE 

after his team's 

season ended in the first round of 
the Big 12 Conference Tournament. 

Shouldn't Weiser have mulled it 
over and given the decision some 
extra thought? 

The Wildcats had done all right 
for themselves, winning IS games 
and coming ohsoclose in several 
others K- State lost nine games by 
five points or less, llie team was 
improving. 

Problem is. Weiser is all about 
hanging banners, and in six years 
with Wooldndge as coach, there 
weren't any Though Wooldridge's 
teams progressed each season dur- 
ing his tenure, he hit a brick wall 
and couldn't make the next jump. 
He never finished higher than sev- 
enth in the Big 12, and never won 
more than six conference games. 

Had Wooldridge been afforded 
the opportunity to stick around 
another year, the "next jump" would 
have been an appearance in the Na- 
tional Invitation Tournament But 
what's the fun in that? 

Weiser wanted to skip a step. 

So he moved quickly, firing 
Wooldridge (this is a "bottom-line 
profession," he said at the time) 
and conducting a national coaching 
search. 

He needed to find a coach who 
could come In and take the medio- 
cre roster Wooldridge left behind 
and sculpt it into an NCAA Tour- 
nament-caliber team He needed a 
coach who could somehow turn all 
those close losses into victories. He 
needed a coach who could destroy 
a losing culture and add instant 
credibility to a dying program that 
hadn't sniffed the postseason since 
1999. 

A magician would have been the 
ideal candidate. Instead, he hired 
Bob Huggins And it's amazing what 
Huggins has done in just one year. 

Twenty wins for the first lime 
since 1998-99; the No 1 -ranked 
recruiting class for 2007; a whole 
bunch of celebrities on the pre-game 
video board and "Big Monday" 
games on ESPN. 

Yes, K- State basketball matters 
once again, and Weiser deserves all 
the credit in the worid for making it 
happen. 

He could have played it safe by 
sticking with Wooldridge for an- 
other year, as many fans had hoped 
for. or by making the low- risk hire. 
There were plenty of deserving can- 
didates with squeaky clean records 
and nice-looking r^sum^s. 

Yet, those candidates didn't have 
a chance in hell of getting KState's 
pro-am turned around in one year 
Most coaches are slow movers They 
like to build programs from the 
ground up, weeding out the left-be- 
hinds while bringing in new talent 
each year until it's time lo get fired 
and start looking for a new job. 

Huggins is different He doesn't 
make excuses Rather, he just uses 
the players he has and finds a way 
to win with them. At 20-9 overall, 
the Wildcats are on the cusp of 
making the NCAA Tournament 

Weiaer won't have to hire an- 
other men's basketball coach for 
quite some time, and his decision 
to fire the previous coach without a 
second thought could teach us all a 
valuable lesson What is papular is 
not always right; what is right is not 
always popular. 

Not until we see the results, any- 
way 



ttflrtir M» ts * JMikr In frint joanullun. 
n«Mt MiH (ommffits If fp9rti»t^b.liw.*dt. 



SPORTS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Nearly there 




K-Sta«a's Cart(«r 
Martin talk* 

with coach Bob 
Huggins during 
rhe first half 
against Kansas. 
Martin and 
me Wildcats 
will travel to 
Oklahoma State 
tonight to play 
the Cowboys. 

Clvrtttoph«f 

H*n«windi*j 



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K- State looks for crucial road win at Oklahoma State 



staff rapofis 

MNSUSIAIiCOaCGi/kN 



The NCAA Tburnament might not 
start until next month, but tonight's 
matchup between K-State and Okla- 
homa State could be an early elimi- 
nation game. 

The Wildcats (20-9, 9-5 Big 12 
Conference) and Cowboys (19-9, 
S-8), two teams seemingly going in 
opposite directions, both are on the 
tournament bubble and need a few 
more wins to pad their records. 

K- State enters the game having 
won seven of its last 10 games, while 
Oklahoma State has lost seven of 10, 
including four straight. 

Once an apparent tournament 
fixture, the Cowboys have stumbled 
since Big 12 play began Jan 6. They 
have lost all six of their road games 
after playing no true road games in 
their n on -conference schedule. 

Luckily, they'll play K-State at 
Gallagher- Iba Arena, a venue that's 
treated them well so far this season 
(the Cowboys are 14-2 at home) 

But even that comes with a dose 



K-SUtc at Oktahofiu State 

Wllii:SlMi9ht 
WlMn: CiKiQltir-nH Arm 

SoMMkOIw. 

M«UM:ESWpkB 

IMt: K-StJtt iportJ radio netwwt 

Uw ftjb wMik at k-stiitt^>tira.am 

of negativity. Oklahoma State has 
lost back-to-back home games - first 
a 75-64 loss to Missouri, then a 66- 
46 loss to Texas A&M on Feb 21 
- and will look to put an end to the 
streak. 

In order to do that, it will rely 
heavily on senior Mario Boggan 
(20.2 ppg) and junior )amesOn Cur- 
ry (17.3 ppg), both of whom rank in 
the top 10 in the conference in scor- 
ing. 

K-State has not beaten the Cow- 
boys at Gallagher- Iba since a 75-62 
win on )an. 9, 1993. However, the 
Wildcats have been a solid road 
team, winning eight games away 
from Bramlage Coliseum this sea- 
son. 

A win over the Cowboys would 
give K-State plenty of reason for 



optimism in terms of making the 
NCAA Tournament According to 
noted statistician Ken Pomcroy, no 
team with 20 wins overall and 10 
conference wins from the six major 
conferences has been denied a tour- 
nament spot since 1999 

The Wildcats also could secure 
fourth place in the Big 12 with a win, 
which would be the highest finish in 
school history. K-State has not fin- 
ished better than seventh in the Big 
12 since its inception in 1996. 

Senior Cartier Maritn leads the 
team in scoring with 16.2 points per 
game, and the Wildcats will look to 
build oif their strong offensive per- 
formance against Colorado Satur- 
day. K-State scored 67 points in their 
win against the Buffaloes, its highest 
total since scoring 93 points against 
Cleveland State Dec. 5, Oklahoma 
State averages 76 points per game. 

The game will mark the first time 
K- State coach Bob Huggins and first- 
year Cowboys coach Sean Sutton 
have met. Sutton was previously an 
assistant coach under his father, Ed- 
die Sutton, for 13 years since 1993. 



2nd player leaves tennis team roster 



ByWandyHaun 

KANSAS VTAFKOtUGIAN 

The K-State tennis team expected 
to play without junior Tamar Kvar- 
atskhelia. However, the Wildcats 
didn't expect to play without sopho- 
more Maria Perevoshchikova 

Perevoshchikova decided to leave 
K-Statc and return to her hometown 
of Izhevsk, Russia, because of home- 
sickness, coach Steve Bictau said. 

With Kvaratskhelia out with an 
injury, Bietau moved junior Tereza 
Prochazkova, who had been side- 
lined since December with a knee 
injury, into the lineup. 

'Tereza has been training the 
whole time," Bietau said "She was 
hoping to work her way up to earn 
a spot. With the situation we had 
this weekend, her process acceler- 
ated, and she was close enough to be 
ready" 

On Saturday, K-State (2-4. 0-0 Big 
12 Conference) tost to Boise State {6- 
1, 2-0 Western Athletic Conference), 
5-2 

The bright spots were juniors Vivi- 
ana Ynireta and Pcmanda Da Valle's 
victories at No 1 and No. 2 smgles, 
respectively Yruicta defeated Polina 
Kokoulina (7 5, 7-6) and Da Valle 
defeated Bianca Jochimsen (6-3, 6- 
3) 



"We were pretty flat in the dou- 
bles," Bietau said. "The singles were 
improved, but the highlights were 
Tereza getting back in there and 
playing competitively and the quality 
of the play at No 1 and No 2 singles 
Both Viviana (Yrureta) and Fernan- 
da (Da Valle) played well." 

Sunday it was the doubles teams 
that excelled against No 38 New 
Mexico (51, 0-0 Mountain West 
Conference) Junior Olga Klimova 
and sophomore Katerina Kudlacku- 
va defeated Sandra Zmak and Jen- 
nifer Ryba (8-3). freshman Natasha 
Vieira and Prochezkova won their 
first doubles match as a team, defeat- 
ing Maria Sotirchos and Nora Quin 
tal (8-3) 

'Tereza (Prochezkova) and Nata 
sha (Vieira) winning their match to 
secure the doubles point was a better 
stari to Sunday," Bietau said 

However, New Mexico swept the 
singles matches and won the dual 
match. 6-1. 'Yrureta and Da Valle 
both forced tie-breaking sets by win- 
ning their second sets Yrureta lost 
her battle to Ola Abou-Zekry (6-1,6- 
7 10-0) and Zmak defeated Da Valle 
(6-4, 3-6, 10-7) 

Bietau said the overall attitude 
of the team improved in Sunday's 
matches. 

"1 thought the effort was great," 




OirMoplwr Hantwlnckal j (OIKGIAN 
Maria Paravoihchlkova s«rv*t during 
K-State'i match against Drakeearlier this 
semester. She left the team last week to 
be closer to Het family in Russia. 

he said "We fought ^eat, and we 
had good team spirit going into the 
matches on Sunday We played ex- 
tremely hard, but we just weren't 
good enough" 




Walsar 



Tuesday, Feb. 27, 2007 

1-MINUTE 
DRILL 

Staff Reports 

KSU I K-State receives high • 
marks in dhfenity study 

Tfie LaboTimy Ibf Otwnlty in sport jt Totaj 
tm UniwBl ^ WBi^ wog nted the K-Sote 
DcpMUiKiKnHHDMNjMc MMofcrlB 

fffix«lnthe«Mor 
divenity. 

K Stat* rKWtd 
OiwnftyinAthlettts 
jwaidsfbrtiathdhir- 
sitystrattgjiandTHe 
IXcofTi|iKinct.The 
jtthieto dtpartment 
Wis one of right in ttw 
ndt»n to be lauded for 
rtsdiwfsity strategy 
and one of nine to be 
singled out fvltscompliarKe with Trtie IX 

The award annoummwnt piDcwdi attiletia 
dfcKtor Tim Weser's scheduled teitinwny 
before th« congrnsiorMl Committee on Energy 
and Commene Subcornmrttet on Commerce, 
Trade and Consumer Protection on Wednesday 
inWashngtor),D.C. 

WMser will represent both K-StHe Univmlty 
and the Dwision I Athletics Dirpctof fesodatJon 
at the hearing which will locus on the lact of 
diverstty in Itider^lp positnns In collegiate 
sports^ 

Olwrsity in Athletics awanh are presented 
on an annual bisis to recognize NCAA Dmsion 
l-A idMc d^kinments that excel m the area 
(i(dhcnlt)r.'nKawanjsa(elMsedondata 
(Oltded Iroin all NCAA ONision l-A universty 
itMetkdtpamnents. 

KSU I Athletic administration 
issues open letter to fans 

K-State^ athktks administration released a 
letter on tofowspofts-oim Monday, condemning 
sewfal instances of animal metreatment at the 
K-State/Kansas men's baskettull game ht 19 
at Bramlage Coliseum 

K-State has a poky thai ansiden Ive 
anlTiab (ciKept guide animab) at atlMD 
evmB ID be omBabind. K-State also forbids 
ttiKMlng ofatects on the playing surface at 
itMetks events. 

TaHun to comply with these potdet sufaftcb 
offrndeis to ejection fmr the fadity and 
possible prosecution under applicable penalty 
of law," according to the letter. 



GLF I Wildcats look to Improve 
soNVS after day one 

After playing just IS-of- J6 holes due to 
Inclement weather Monday at the Fresno 
State Invitational in Fresno, Calif, the K-Stite 
women's golf team is 1 1th of 18 teams, 17 
strokes behind the lead. 

Leading the WIdcats is freshman Abb) 
Sunner, who shot a 77 t-f 5), closely followed 
by junior Hailey Mireles, who shot a 78 ( -Hi}, 
and junior Michelle Regan, who shot a 78 
(+61. 

Coach KristI Knight said she Is looking 
forwan) to the final round today with just 
seven stokes between the Wildcats and 
Imirth-place team. Long Beach State. 

"Michelle shot a six over par today, but 
was hve over on two holes,' Knight said.'Oui 
consistency needs to improve.' 



The AssociateiJ Press 

BBO j Royals need Berroa 
to return to rookie form 

SURPRISE, Ani. — The Kansas City Royals 
need their shortstop to be more like hB younger 
seK this year, not the wtiiffin^ fmshated fHift 
he was in 2006. 

Tm going to e)cpect 
'Viqd Berroa to come 
!)d(ktobetheAngelof 
2003,' general nunager 
Dayton Moore said 
Monday 'For us to be 
a winning team, we've 
got to have consistent 
play horn our shortstofi 
Angel realties this is a 
defining year for him.* 
BefToai, 29, Is signed to a multi-year contract 
that eqiiRS m 200S with an option tor 2009, 
But his job cnM be on the line if he doesnt 
rewrse hts downward trend. 

The HoyaK have two young promising 
shortstops, Andres Blanco and Angel Sanchet 
waiting in the high minors. They tho brought In 
veteran Alei Oonzalet as a non-roster Irwite. 

Berroa edged out New rork Yankees 
outfielder Hideki Matsui by tour votes in 200J 
to win the American League Roolue of the Yisar 
award. That year, he hit 2S7 with 17 home runs 
73 RBIs, 2T stolen bases and 92 mns. 

last year, he Nit .234, with a iS9 on-twc 
percentage, and had only 2B einn-base hits ani 
three stolen bases. 

H*s plate disdpline was hontWe — be 
had 14 walks and 88 strikeouts In 474 at -bats 
— andhehflapuny.montheroad. 

"last year was no good, and I am woriting 
1 10 percent to get it nght,' Berroa said, TTiis 
ywf I warn to get back to (20051 and show 
|M|)le the real Angel Berroa. i want to put 2006 
behind me and start new." 

Can Benoa be as good as he was in 2003? 

THa^ an WieiKtmg question,' Moore sakt 
"We've asked ourselves that a lot' 

(nstead of returning in the offseason to the 
OomWcan ReputJic, Berroa twiamed in Kansas 
Qtyand worked cwi his AeKlbtlity with Royah 
dnngth and conditioning coordlnalor Ty Hill. 




Berroa 



¥ 



Tuesday, Feb. 27, 2007 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 7 



Preparing pets for homes 

Untfl adopted, animals live with foster parents* 



lyNatMhaMiytff 

KAMSUSTATKOILEGIAN 

Poster parenting no longer 
is limited to children. 

People of sll ages, includ- 
ing a handful of K-State stu- 
dents, have volunteered to 
shelter animals during the 
adoption process. 

In order to take in ani- 
mals, those looking to foster 
must be evaluated and obtain 
a Kansas Poster License. 

The Riley County Humane 
Society helps find a place for 
animals needing a temporary 
home, and foster coordina- 
tors Madelyn Short and Lisa 
Pryant work to find foster 
families for cats and dogs. 

The state limits foster par- 
ents to 19 animals, Short said, 
including animals the owners 
might already have. 



"That's pretty ridiculous," 
she said "Of course, if you 
have a mama cat or dog with 
a litter, the numbers can run 
up pretty quickly." 

If an abandoned puppy is 
found, the Humane Society 
tries to find a home with a 
mother to nurture the ani- 
mal. If the mother will not 
accept the baby animal, it 
will be bottle fed, although 
Short said this is rare. 

Julia Paul, junior in animal 
science and industry, said 
she heard about becoming an 
animal foster parent from a 
co-worker, and she and her 
roommates now act as a fos- 
ter family. 

Paul's roommate, Erin 
Kolarik, senior in mass com* 
munications, said she enjoys 
being a foster parent because 
she wanted a dog but never 



got one because of cost and 
housing 

Kolarik and Paul have fos- 
tered three dogs, one for one 
week and the others for two 
weeks each. 

Both women said it is hard 
not to become attached to a 
foster pet. 

"Every time you come 
home from class, there's 
someone excited to see you, 
but there's a lot of respon- 
sibility with it, too," Kolarik 
said. "There's messes on the 
carpet and whining at night." 

During a dog's stay, I>aul 
said foster families work to 
correct its problematic char 
acteristics. 

"Every animal you're go- 
ing to have is going to be 
hard because the point is to 
make them an adoptable pet," 
she said. 



*- ^^^S^f^^^l^B^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 


U^^^T'^^^ 








1 


n 


m 



LyndMy Som | COLLEGIAN 
Julia Paut Juniof In animal Klanca and industry, and Erin Knlarlk, senior In mats commun I cations, 

play fetch with Hulk Tuesday afternoon in their backyard. Hulk is a fostei pet awaiting adoption. 



The Humane Society pro- 
vides foster parents with food 
and other necessities for the 
animals including veterinary 
appointments, but parents 



have to find a way to get the 
animals to the scheduled ap- 
pointments. 

"It's just a really, really 
great thing to do," Kolarik 



said. "It's a great way to vol- 
unteer, and the Humane So- 
ciety provides you with ev- 
erything so you just have to 
have time." 



Biologist discusses conservation projects, pitfalls to conimunity 



ByMHwKttliy 

KANSAS SIME COLLEGIAN 

A biologist from the U.S. 
Fish and Wildlife service spoke 
Monday about the agency's 
conservation efforts in Kansas 
as part of the Friends of Sunset 
Zoo winter education series. 

Michele McNulty, biologist 
for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service's Manhattan field of- 
fice, presented 'Kansas Con- 
servation Efforts through the 
Fish and Wildlife Service" to 
an audience of almost 50 at 
City Hall. 

■ "Our mission is to provide 
biological advice to other fed- 
eral and state agencies, indus- 
try and the public concerning 
the conservation of fish and 
wildlife that may be affected by 
development," McNulty said. 

Habitat toss is the largest 
factor in the decline of all fish 
and wildlife species in Kansas, 
she said. 

Twelve species are listed as 
threatened or endangered in 
Kansas on the U.S. Pish and 
Wildlife service's Web site. 
These species include the dino- 
saur Rsh, whooping crane and 
piping clover. 

'. The bald eagle is one species 
making a return in Kansas, she 
said. Originally listed as threat- 
ened in 1967, it recently was 
proposed for de-listing due to 
its thriving population. 



"We've been conducting 
research on this growing nest- 
ing population in Kansas since 
the '80s," McNulty said. "We 
use purple bands to distinguish 
Kansas' bald eagles in an effort 
to collect data and track the 
birds" 

Kansas has 25 bald eagle 
nests resulting in 35 fledglings, 
she said. 

However, not all of ICansas' 
species share the same success 
The neosho madtom, a stream 
fish common to Kansas, has 
been monitored since 1991, 
McNulty said She said large 
businesses have hurt their hab- 
itat. 

"In the areas where they 
occur, gravel dredging is big 
business, and Kansas does not 
regulate it," McNulty said. 

As well as protecting spe- 
cies native to Kansas, McNulty 
said the introduction of new 
species or reintroduction of 
species is another endeavor 
of her branch. One example is 
the black-footed ferret reintro- 
duction program. 

"We want to begin possibly 
next fall. All the ferrets would 
be microchipped so we could 
monitor them," McNulty said. 
"We have talked about captur- 
ing natural ferrets from South 
Dakota and Wyoming, possi- 
bly as many as 40 if we could" 

The black-footed ferret was 
listed as endangered In 1967, 



and was last seen naturally in 
Kansas in 1957 A potential 
reintroduction site is Logan 
County, which McNulty said 
would be a good opportunity 

"We don't have plague in 
Kansas, and ferrets are suscep- 
tible to plague," she said "Also, 
since there (is) a large prairie 
dog population, Kansas is a 
good fit." 

The ferret's natural food 
source is the prairie dog, Mc- 
Nulty said. A ferret eats about 
100 of them per year, but the 
plan has met some resistance. 

"Farm Bureau is one of our 
biggest opponents due to land 
owner rights," McNulty said. 

Preservation of the Flint 
Hills' native tall grass is one of 
the efforts being the service is 
conducting in partnership with 
the Partners for Fish and Wild- 
life program. According to the 
U.S. Pish and Wildlife Service, 
the Flint Hills area has the 
largest remaining area of na- 
tive tall grass prairie in North 
America. Only three percent 
of the original tall grass eco- re- 
gion remains in North Ameri- 
ca, and the remaining tall grass 
faces continued threats. 

"Th^ work with land own- 
ers directly, through wildlife 
extension agreements," Mc- 
Nulty said. "At times, they will 
pay for up to 90 percent of the 
land cost for enhancement and 
restoration." 




MIchck McNulty, biologist with 

conservation efforts in Kansas the 

So far, 147500 acres have 
been restored. 

The winter education series 
is an attempt to inform citizens 
about the natural world that 
surrounds them, from their 
own backyard to issues on a 
national scale. Earlier this year, 
the series featured a wildlife 
photographer from National 
Geographic magazine. 

"The idea is to talk on vari- 
ous subjects of natural resource 



lyndMy Bom I COLLEGIAN 
tha US Fish and Wlldllfo Sarvka, glvoi a presentation about animal 
Manhattan City Hail Tuesday evening. 



interest, particularly those that 
affect animals, and also to keep 
people interested on those is- 
sues during (he winter months, 
when they're not going to the 
zoo per say," said Curt Loupe, 
director of Parks and Recre- 
ation. 

Loupe said he regularly at- 
tends the series 

Friends of the Sunset Zoo is 
a membership-based organiza- 
tion whose mission is to sup- 



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Page 8 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Tuesday, Feb. 27, 200? 



House bill targets 'obscene' materials in Kansas schools 



THE USOaATEQ PRESS 

TOPEKA, Kan. - Lcgula- 
tore are taking aim at a legal 
protection for teachers, taying 
it allows obscene materials in 
the classroom under the guise 
of academic value. 

Supporters of the bill said 
there is potential harm to 
minors in being exposed to 
obscenity or pornography in 
novels, plays, books and Rims. 

The bill would strip the pro- 
tection from criminal charges 
from elementary and second- 
ary teachers, but retain it for 



college and university instruc- 
tors and professors. 

"The practical effect of 
this defense is that materials 
that would be illegal if sold 
at a pom shop may be legal 
if displayed to a kindergarten 
data," said Rep. Lance Kinzer, 
R-Olathe, who sought the leg- 
islation. 

The bill, expected to be de- 
bated in the coming weeks, 
was endorsed by all but one 
member of the House Federal 
and State Affairs Committee 

"This bill is not about stop- 
ping nefarious teachers." said 



the lone dissenter, Rep. Ann 
Mah, D-Tbpeka. "This bill is 
about giving nefarious district 
attorneys a tool to bring charg- 
es against English teachers." 

Mah was referring to John- 
son County District Attorney 
Phill Kline, the conservative 
former state attorney general. 
She said there was a test case 
for the obscenity bill in the 
Blue Valley school district, 
also in Johnson County. 

The parent group Citi- 
zens for Literary Standards 
in Schools has sought for two 
years to get the school district 



to remove 14 books from its 
curriculum. 

Rep. Benjamin Hodge, R- 
Overland Park, said state taw 
regarding promotion of ob- 
scenity, gives school boards 
too much authority over class- 
room behavior. 

Kinzer's bill, Hodge said, 
would "at least give parents in 
Blue Valley a voice." 

Kinzer, however, said the 
bill's intent goes beyond a lone 
group of angry parents in a 
sin^e district. 

John Burford, who lives in 
Mission and serves as pastor 



of Ward Parkway Presbyte- 
rian Church in Kansas City, 
Mo., said school employees 
shouldn't have leeway to pres 
ent obscene materials to mi- 
nors 

"The last place that should 
be immune from prosecu- 
tion for distributing obscenity 
to children is the schools we 
charge to teach them the truth." 
Burford said "Obscenity is all 
about lies Its lies include that 
sex is acceptable with anyone, 
at any time, in any place. Ob- 
scenity teaches that women 
uill eventually enjoy rape if 



the rapist persists." 

David Schauner, general 
counsel for the Kansas-Na- 
tional Education Association, 
said the bill would have a chill- 
ing effect, prompting teachers 
to self -censor lessons to avoid 
potential lawsuits. 

Mark Tallman, lobbyist 
for the Kansas Association of 
School Boards, said cunrici^; 
lum disputes were best left to 
voters to decide when choos- 
ing school board members. 

"We have elections every 
two years," he said "This is not 
B legislative issue." 



Regulators approve 
sale of Aquila utilities 



THE ASSOCIATED PNfSS 

KANSAS CITY, Mo. - 
Kansas regulators signed off 
on Aquila Inc.'s plan to sell 
its electric utilities in the state 
for S249 million, the company 
said Monday. 

The Kansas Corporation 
Commission late Friday ap- 
proved the sale, the final piece 
of a plan announced in 2005 
to sell the company's natural 
gas utilities in Michigan, Min- 
nesota and Missouri and other 
assets to three companies for 
$896.7 million. 

It's not connected to the 
company's announcement 
earlier this month that it plans 
to sell the rest of its assets to 
utilities Great Plains Enei^ 
Inc and Black Hills Corp for 
more than $2.6 billion. 

TTic Mid-Kansas Electric 
Co., a coalition of six con- 
sumer-owned cooperatives 
that also owns the SunQower 
Electric Power Corp., is ex- 
pected to close the Kansas 
electric deal by April 1, ac- 
quiring 69,000 customers. 

Aquila announced the 
three-company deal in Sep- 
tember 2005 as a way to 
streamline operations and 
generate needed revenue to 
pay off high levels of debt in- 
curred over the years from ill- 
fated forays into energy trad- 



ing and other nonregulated 
businesses. 

The Kansas electric deal 
was originally to bring in 
$255 million, but the price 
was scaled back because of 
existing contracts with Mid- 
Kansas and Westar Energy 
Inc 

Despite assurances it would 
not sell the company, Aquila 
officials said on Feb. 7 that its 
cross-town rival, Great Plains 
Energy, would acquire all of 
the company's outstanding 
shares for $1.7 billion in cash 
and stock and assume about 
$1 billion in Aquila's debt. 

Before the sale. Black Hills 
would purchase Aquila's elec- 
tric utility in Colorado and 
its gas utilities in Colorado, 
Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. 
Black Hills, based in Rapid 
City, S.D., would pay about 
$940 million in cash for the 
utilities. 

Officials said it could take 
up to a year for regulators and 
shareholders to approve the 
deal. 

Norwalk, Conn-based 
hedge fund IHrate Capital 
LLC has led a chorus of in- 
vestors lobbying shareholders 
to shoot down the sale. They 
say the price is too low and 
Aquila executives will receive 
exorbitant severance pack- 
ages. 



Giuliani, now a Republican, addresses his Democratic past 



tHEASSOCKtEOWSS 

WASHINGTON - Re- 
publican presidential hopeful 
Rudy Giuliani addressed his 
Democratic past on Monday 
and offered one reason for his 
political conversion - taxes. 

"I don't think anything 
separates us more right now 
between Republicans and 
Democrats than how we took 
at taxes," the former New 
York mayor said. "What we 
understand as Republicans is 
that, sure, the government is 
an important player in this, 
but we are essentially a pri- 
vate economy. What Demo- 
crats really believe .. is that it 
is essentially a agovemment 
Iconomy" 

In the days of President 
Kennedy, Giuliani said. 
Democrats understood the 
concept of the private econo- 
my and cutting taxes But, he 
said. Democrats have "kind 
of lost that." 

"It's one of the reasons 



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exercise thereof; or 
Blirid{(ing the freedom of 
speech, or of ttie press; or 
the right of the people 
peaceably to tissemble, 
and to petition the 
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that I used to be a Democrat 
and I'm now a Republican," 
Giuliani said before quoting 
Winston Churchill as saying: 
"If you're not a liberal when 
you're 20, you have no heart, 
but if you're not a conserva- 
tive by the time you're 40, 
you have no brain," 

The line prompted laugh- 
ter from Giuliani's audience, 
a few hundred people affili- 
ated with the Hoover Institu- 
tion, a public policy center 

As he seeks the Repub- 
lican nomination, Giuliani 
faces the challenge of win- 
ning over conservatives who 
make up the GOP's base and 
view him skeptically because 
of his moderate views on 
social issues and his past al- 
legiance to the Democratic 
Party. 

In 1994, Giuliani en- 
dowed Democratic Gov. Ma- 
rio Cuomo over Republican 
challenger George Pataki. 

Addressing his political 
about-face, Giuliani said he 



once was a Democrat, then 
spent five years as an in- 
dependent before finding a 
home with the Republican 
Party. 

"Ronald Reagan made 
only two changes. 1 was like 
Churchill, I made three," he 
quipped. 

Turning serious, he said 
he struggled with his politi- 
cal identity while he was an 
independent. 

"I would say to myself 
Democrats care about the 
poor and Republicans don't, 
and how can I join the party 
that doesn't care about the 
poor," Giuliani said. "1 fi- 
nally came to the conclusion 
that we care about the poor 
more." 

Later, when questioned 
on whether he had the for- 
eign policy credentials to be 
president. Giuliani sought 
to diffuse another potential 
stumbling block to the nomi- 
nation. 

"What makes you think 



Royal PuTDle yearbook 



stories 



that the mayor of New York 
City doesn't need a foreign 
policy?" Giuliani asked, as 
the crowd laughed and ap- 
plauded 

Defending his record, he 
said he's traveled the world 
extensively since being out 
of office and grasped forei^ 
policy issues while mayor in 
the 1990s. 

"It's something that f 
think I know, I think I know 
as welt as anybody else who's 
running for president, prob- 
ably better than a lot," Giu- 
liani said. 

At an evening event in 
northern Virginia, the ex- 
mayor sought to buck up ac- 
tivists at a state Republican 
Party dinner a few months 
after the GOP sustained se- 
vere electoral losses at all 
levels of government. 

"You learn more from de- 
feat than you do from victo- 
ry," Giuliani said. "Our parlV 
has to be and should be th^ 
party of the future." 



Buy your copy 
in Kediie 103 
or tall S32-6SSS 



2007-2008 SGA Elections 



Primary Election 



http://sqaeiections.ksu.edu 

Tuesday 

February 27 

8:00 a.m. 

until 

Wednesday 

February 28 

6:00 p.m. 



Select tlie two president/vice president 

t(cl<ets tliat will be placed on the 

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Tuesday, Feb. 27, 2007 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Rige9 



FICTION 



Earbud Evil | A song worth fighting for 



By Logan C. Adaini 

KANS*i SIAU COIUGIAN 

Editor's note: TOis is the second segment of "Earbud 
Evil." a fictional story the Collegian will publish daily for 
the next three weeks. This storj/ follows Alex, a fictional 
K-State student, as he deals with a campus-wide crisis that 
threatens the university. 

Though the names of real people will accompany made- 
'iip characters, all events are fictional. This is intended for 
entertainment and is not factually based. 

I wouldn't have cared much (or botany lab if not for Ly- 
copodium. 

' Bill, my lab partner, and I learned the spores from this 
fern-like plant can be fun when Chip, the wacky grad 
student in charge of our lab, iprayed some on a lit Bunsen 
burner. 

Poof! 

The airborne spores bunt into flame as Chip's face went 
all plant -pyromaniac. He explained that Lycopodium makes 



great organic fireworks. Bill and i looked forward to lab 
from then on. 

But Bill didn't seem so upbeat this time. He wouldn't 
speak or look at mc when 1 walked in the door and didn't 
return my salutations when I sat down beside him. 

Bill would only stare at the front of the room and listen to 
whatever was playing on his iPod. Class began and he took 
out his pen and notepad, but all he wrote were little squig- 
gles. 

"You all right, there. Bill?" I asked, but he didn't hear me. 

I reached to pull out the nearest earbud. Bill grabbed my 
wrist with one hand and my neck with the other. He shook 
his head slowly and mouthed the word "no." 

"Bill, Alex, is there a problem?" Chip demanded from up 
front. My partner relaxed his grip and returned to his sense- 
less doodles 

1 figured it was one hell of a song he had playing and left 
It at that. Par be it from me to worry about him getting his 
five daily points. I'm not his tutor. 

Class ended early, and Bill quickly shoved his notepad 
into his bag and showed little care for other students as he 



bumped into every single person between his seat and the 
door Chip stopped me on the way out. 

"What was the deal with your pv^trr" he asked. "Did 
someone rtin over his dog or his cat or - 1 durwo, hia ham- 
ster?" 

I paused, pushed aside my lousy day and managed an 
answer. 

"Am I my partner's keeper, now?" I asked with the beat 
grin 1 could manage, which wasn't much. "I bet it was juft 
something he ate." 

I said goodbye, but the last word stuck in my head, and 
my gut. 

Ate. Eat. Pood. 

tt was now early afternoon, and my stomach was ada- 
mantly reminding me I hadn't eaten anything since the night 
before. I took the south exit out of Ackert Hall and made my 
way south to the Union. 

A large man slammed into me near Ward Hall and nearly 
knocked me Uito the grau. 1 only caught a glUnpa* of hla 
face, but I noticed Httle white wires going out of hll ean Mnd 
into his chest pocket. 



Brownback seeks attention in crowded field 



THUSJOCIATED PRESS 

, SPAHTANBURG, S.C, 
TT Sen. Sam Brownback said 
Monday he is calling every 
Republican in this county 
he can before a presidential 
^traw poll later in the week 

It's that kind of personal 
attention the Kansas sena- 
tor hopes can take him from 
obscurity to the front of a 
crowded field for the OOP's 
2008 presidential nomina- 
tion 

The straw poll will be 
one of the first tests in Spar- 
tanburg County, which is at 
the center of the contest in 
South Carolina, one of the 
earliest primaries in 2008. 



The county will run its 93 
precinct meetings Thursday 
as if they were a caucus. 

People will show up at 
their local polling places 
and choose from among 11 
Republican candidates listed 
on a paper ballot, county 
Republican chairman Rick 
Beltram said 

Brownback is working for 
the vote harder than most 
candidates by calling vot- 
ers, sending them mail and 
spending time here. But he 
isn't alone. 

"We see five or six cam- 
paigns actively working the 
crowd," Beltram said. 

That includes U.S Sen, 
John McCain of Arizona 



and former Massachusetts 
Gov. Mitt Romney, who 
have made several visits to 
Spartanburg In the past y«ar. 
Former New York Mayor 
Rudy Giuliani made a trip to 
the area last week to talk to 
firelighters, 

Brownback stopped by 
The Beacon Restaurant on 
Monday, to the applause of 
about two dozen supporters. 

The restaurant specializes 
in greasy burgers and fries 
and has become a popular 
spot on the campaign trail. 

"How many votes do I 
get for eating a chili-cheese- 
burger?" he asked. 

Brownback tried to ap- 
peal to the conservative 



crowd by decrying same-sex 
unions. 

"We've got to rebuild the 
family, not tear it down " he 
said. 

It was the same message 
Brownback delivered earlier 
in the day as he stopped by 
U.S. Rep. Bob Inglis' regular 
monthly meeting with con- 
stituents only a few blocks 
away. 

Brownback also stopped 
at a Spartanburg crisis preg- 
nancy center. 

"For the life ofme, I don't 
understand what's contro- 
versial in standing for life. 
And yet for some reason 
that's become controversial," 
Brownback said. 



Sebelius won't back 
candidate until next year 



MASSOCIATEDPKSS 

WASHINGTON - Demo- 
cratic presidential candidates 
hoping to get an endorsement 
fi^m Kansas Gov. Kathleen 
Sebelius will have to wait until 
next year. 

Sebelius said Monday she 
won't back anyone until 2008 
at the earliest because she b 
focused on helping her par^ 
elect governors this year in 
Louisiana, Mississippi and 
Kentucky. 

"I think it's appropriate that 
my political focus remain on 
those three governor's races," 



Sebellui said in an Inttrvlcw 
between forums at the winter 
meeting of the National Gov- 
ernors Association. 

Seven other governor* al- 
ready have endorsed preaiden- 
tial hopefuls who want to tap 
into established networks for 
fundraising and par^ support. 

"Tht candidates are very 
wise to seek governors' sup- 
port," Sebelius said. "Clearly 
governors have already dem- 
onstrated they know how to 
put together a majority of the 
votes in their state border and 
know how to talk to their con- 
stituents." 



The Collegian U avaUsble at ^^^^^^ 

|li2locatloii8neary«m. Oituciw 




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Page 10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Tuesday, Feb. 27.2007 



REC I Committee uses Mizzou Complex example 



continued from Page 1 

Mizzoy Rec Complex Maddy 
CKplained everything inside its 
complex was "branded," mean 
ing there were many displays 
of Tiger pride. 

The Missouri mascot wa* 
depicted on the end of every 
dumbbell, lai^e "M " logos were 
displayed on every door, even 
the building's color scheme in- 
volved strictly school colors 

"School pride is definitely 
something 1 would like to see 
more of at K- State's rec com- 
plex," Maddy said 'We don't 
want the rec to be just a name- 
less, shapeless place that stu- 
dents go to" 

Another innovative move 
Missouri made was to invite 
outside vendors into its rec 
complex to open small service 
venues for students, like a spa 
complete with tanning beds, 
massages and a supplemental 
drink "mini bar ' 

These also are several pos- 
sibilities the committee is con- 
sidering for its expansion pro- 
posal. Maddy said. 

While the purpose of the 
committee is to assist in orga- 



nizing a Rec Complex expan- 
sion proposal, it made it clear 
its mission is to represent the 
students of K-State. 

"Our mission is to ascertain 
whether or not the students 
are in favor or whether or not 
there is a perceived need for 
expansion," Tbpp said. 

This is where the student 
survey comes in. The commit- 
tee will know the results of the 
survey in several weeks and 
will be able to put together a 
more complete proposal for 
the possible expansion after 
reviewing students' responses. 
This also would include an 
overall cost analysis. 

If the committee feels stu- 
dents are, by majority, in fa- 
vor of updating the rec, it will 
propose the expansion to the 
Student Covering Association, 
which in turn will vote If the 
resolutoin passes, SGA will 
assign separate committees 
to continue the project, Ibpp 
said. 

Many students offered 
strong opinions about the pos- 
sible expansion of the rec cen- 
ter 

Melissa Slack, sophomore 



Royal Purple yearbook 



we've got the stories you've got to 



Bu; your copr 
in Kcdiif 103 
or cM SI2.iSSS 



in advertising, said updating 
the rec complex is a good idea 
and would help cut back on 
the crowding issues. 

However, not everyone is in 
favor of the updates. 

"I'm happy with the rec just 
how it is," said Andrew Ma- 
ncss, freshman in secondary 
education and mathematics. 
"I've never had a problem with 
it, and I'm not sure why they're 
even considering updating it," 

Both Slack and Mancss said 
they frequent the K- State Rec 
Complex about five times a 
week, using multiple areas of 
the facilities. 

While the committee puts 
the finishing touches on its 
Rec Complex expansion pro- 
posal over the next few weeks, 
members encourage students 
to take the survey sent in an e- 
mail last week. 

"It's only a few simple ques- 
tions, and we would really ap- 
preciate student input," Maddy 
said. "We just want to do this 
as a representation of the K- 
State student body" 



i/5c self-serve 
copies 

^iaflift ^oeii aid topi' 



HANDWRITING | Shorthand affects grammar 




11 ^^ 

\ ^TLR & GKILL 

1 J 



APARTMENT HUNTING 101 

Most Locations Near KSU 

You can WALK to: 

Class • Library 
AggieviUe * Banks 
Restaurants • Coffee Shops 
Watering Holes (NO DUIs) 

Clean 1-2-3-4 BR Apartments, 
Duplexes, and Houses 

DOMT SKIP CLASS BECAUSE VOU 
CANT Fim A MUIKIMC SPACE! 

SERIOUS STUMNTl R ENT mH: 

SINCE 1974 

view our property starting the 19th •28th 

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Lease signing begins Feb. 26th 

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mimm-. mm mmi 

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continued from Page 1 

for teachers of English, col- 
lecU old books with hand- 
written inscriptions by the 
author at the beginning 

"Many of my books have 
wonderful inscriptions in 
them," she said, "I like them 
in linguistic value of how 
sentence structure was then 
and now." 

Sentence structure is no 
longer what it used to be, 
she said. Students are in a 
hurry, and use shorthand in 
their writing often utilized 
in text messaging. 

Students learn to write 
when they are in preschool, 
said Kasey Kile, preschool 
and school-age program de- 
velopment coordinator at 
the K-State Child Develop- 
ment Center 

"Our goal is to make them 
use their finger and thumb, 
building their muscles and 
working from there," she 



said. "We don't focus pri- 
marily on specific ways of 
writing techniques We'll 
help guide them through let- 
ters and letter recognition." 

Handwriting is empha- 
sized in middle school, but 
by the time a student reach- 
es high school, it is almost 
nonexistent, according to 
the New York Times article 

In fact, only a handful of 
universities have classes that 
emphasize handwriting, the 
article said. These universi- 
ties include Brigham Young, 
the University of Nebraska 
at Kearney and St Ambrose 
in Davenport, Iowa 

Steve Graham, a profes 
sor at Vanderbilt University. 
told The New York Times 
some might not think it mat 
ters, but there is a link be 
tween lack of handwriting 
skills and poor grammar. 

But Susan G. Harris, the 
headmistress at Harford 
Day School in Bel Air, Md , 



told The New York Times 
handwriting skills stick with: 
students for life. < 

"We don't do the glam-> 
orous makeover here," she' 
said "We believe that skills; 
and habits of the mind take; 
years to develop We just I 
know that there aren't quick • 
fixes. ' 

"With handwriting or; 
anything else, you need the; 
Rrm foundation there Once 
you learn to walk, you won't; 
go back to crawling again." * 



ROYAL PURPLE 



we've got the sto^je^ 
you've got to read. 



Get ^oiji 

Royvil PurpI* Y^^i^>ook 

in Kpdzit' 1(Ji, 

or c^ll 53i-655'- 



Strike a pose 





these 

k-staters 

did 



we'll be in aggievIKe thursday, march 1 , 

9:00 - 1 1 :00 p.m. under varney's mofquee 

and Saturday, march 3 at bramlage 

for the Oklahoma state game. 

so bring your friends and s^ike a pose! 

it's free and the best shots will 
be in the 2007 royal purple yearbook. 






to see other students who got their pictures taken go to 
royalpurple. ksu.edu 




CLASSIFIEDS 



Classifieds continue 
on the next page 



Congress shall make no law respecting an wm 

establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free 
exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of 
speech, or of the press; or the right of the 
people peaceably to aSSetflble, and to petitiof 
th e Go vern ment for a redress of grie vances, ^ 

First Aniendment 





Loil and lounii sd> ctn 
b» placM tTM fof thrM 

diyi. 



lEARN TO FLVI K-Smt* 
Rymg Club has liv* atr- 
piarfes and tomnt lales 
Cal 78S-77e-t7M, www - 



ML...ii 



U.S. CONS in UTION 



ADUn 

IB 


[Tilt 

1 

i 


SI 

bsa 


s 

BS 




nanca 4S14 taaum » 
•fy parion wjyal tipportu 
nUvkihoudngwIthoutdli 
Unction Qn account ol 
r«c«, i.t, familial itatun 
mm»ry italui, ditablliiv 
rrt(9lon. aga. colof. na- 
tional or^jln or ancMtrv. 
VJoladon* inouid ba ra- 
ftotfa to th. D*r#ctor at 
Human Ratourc.t al City 
Hall. (7«B)S«7-»40. 




Tuesday, Feb. 27, 2007 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 1 1 



Classifieds continue 
from the previous page 



CLASSIFIEDS 



lb place an advertisement call 



I I L II II I I 

■ lu- 



ll II 

■J s 



I I I I 11 '. 




LET'S RENT 



CLEAN. QUIET baumant 
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SPACIOUS FOUR-BED- AS NEEDED J U VENUE 
ROOM. tm> M(h INTAKE AND ASSESS- 
Wuhwf dryw, nice MENT OFFICER. Blm 



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p«r«on All utIllltM Irv 
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yinl, pels allowMl OA- 
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monlti pkiB 
78S-3r3-iMe 



T>1REE. FOUR, FIVE. SIX 
PLUS BEDROOMS Look 



1. $1100/ rcctfona <s accepting appk- 
cattotis lot several as 
needed, oo-call [uvenile in- 
take and ji«s«s&manl offi- 
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menls inctude a hign 



mo lo. mat peilecl home ^,^1 ^,^ ^^^y 
to rant? Qreat satectton ^^ 



1203 THURSTON, one 
btock to campus NMveOfv 
•toueUon. One am! two- 
bsdnxxn apaitmenls, 

washer/ dryer. dish- 
washer, tMk»ny. prtvat* 
parWng, Mcurlr^ Hgfiilng 
No pets. June 2007 leasA 
785-539-5508 or 

785-564 -oeS7 

1I1S POfNTZ, iwo-bed 
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park wWi olt-ati«at parH- 
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trash pakl. June lease. No 
pels. 765-313-4812. 

162* FAIR VIEW. Oulet 
orw-bedrDOm (t400) and 
Siudlo (S375) near KSU 
Laundry. Water, trash 
pakt. No pets, no smok- 
ing. 1 JUNE. 
530-343-1121. 

1832 CLAFLIN Across 
tram Martatt Hall TVvO- 
badroocn apartments 
Clean, quiet, private park- 
ing No smoking, no pets 
Swo. August iMwa. 

7a&-539-SS06 or 

7«6-S64-0aS7 

350 N leih Two btocks 
to K-5t«te and Aggleville 
two-l>e4ro«n apartments 
Clean, quiet, pnvata party- 
ing. No smoking, no pets 
tSM. ttune and August 
leases 78S.539-S50B or 
785-564-0857 

JUNE LEASE two-bed- 
room apailmem. Walk to 
campus, Excelledl condl- 
Voni tocaVon ta^Hmtti.- 

78fr4)0-2814 



PHt-iCASWQ JUNE and 

Auguat. Sotrw units brand 
new, ckise to KSU, 
washer/ diyet included. 
Call lor details 

785-776-2102, youngwllK- 
5®yahoci.com. wwwwUk- 
saptsixim 

THRee-BEDROOM WITH 
porch and sunrown. 511 
Bluemonl, August 1 lease, 
laurtdry iriduded, no peta, 
t34S plus utilittei, 
TI5-31}4M<2, leave mes- 
sage 

TWO AND three-bed- 
room. Ck>sa to campus. 
Central aJr, dishwasher, 
coin operated laundry fa- 
cility Available June or 
August No pals, 

785-537-1746 Or 

785-539-1545, 




1111 WHARTON Manoi 
Road, louf-bedroom (oiwei 
level dupl«i with neutral 
cotors. two baths, washer/ 
dryer furnished, 817 V«l- 
ner, three-twdioom kiwer 
level dupiex witti new car- 
pel, neutral cotors and 
wsaher/ dryer hook-ups 
Very reaaonable rent with 
great space in both du- 
ptaxes. June le«s« No 
pets, Cal 785-3 13-*6 12. 

NICE DUPLEX sa« Val- 

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bath irH:k>dsa all appli- 
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pets. Available Autjust 1, 
J10B0/ 
785-293-5197 



1001 KEARNEY Four- 
Bedroom. alao have 
Three. Five, Six and 
Seven-Bedroom houses. 
All JUNE 1 (entals. Pets 
OK 785-317-7713 

IMS CAMPUS Road 
Four -bedroom, two baths 
Central aii. washer/ dryer 
furnished. Neutral cotors 
wilh nkn, new t>aths. 
Large tMdrooma lor an af- 
lordable price. June 
lease. No pets 

786-3l3~iS12. 

300 N. 11th On Ctty Pahi 
Two targe, sunny three- 
bedroom (S7S0], Laurtdry 
Water, traah paid Nu 
pals, no smoking. 1 JUNE 
and 1 AUGUST 

530-342- 112 V 

BEAUTIFUL REMOD- 
ELED hwnea 1612, 1614 
Piano, foul- ftve-tiedroom, 
two bath. Irash carpet/ 
paint. New kitchen, beth. 
modem appllanoes CIomi 
to campus. Move in June; 
August TtS-304-a9«7 

BRHTNAV RIDGE town 
hOuM foul/ hva-twdroom, 
two end one-fialf baths, in- 
cludes appliances, 
washer/ dryer. No pels. 
Available August 1 
785-293-5197, 

FIVE-BEDROOM 

HOUSE Walk to campus 
Two tiltchens. Ilreplacea, 
central air. neutral ootora, 
washer/ dryer furnished, 
garage, lawn mainte- 
nance June lease. No 
pets CM 705-313-4812 



NEW USTINQ, BvaUeble 
June 1, Four to flve-Md- 
room house located east 



month, 78S-S3»-4949 

rWE-6l6RMU 



and pnces. Capstone 
$1500/ Management 



LOOKING FOR part-time SEVERAL POSITIONS 

hvelp In Scrapbooh tti>ra, available lor ftekt lechnl- 

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day daytime, Enpertence prairie chk^ans In 

prelerred Please call S«b- Kansas These poeMoni 

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July. August. 



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THREE- 
ROOMS, ns( 
August lease 
785 776-^051 



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pets 



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rate tor call-out duty is 
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ment la $30/ day On-call hall- tvKO houm per day 
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THREE-BEDROOM 
HOUSE at 1721 Ander- 
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SUMMER INTERNSHIP 
Halp ma run my tHisiness 
Open lo a) majors Five 
poattiona available, aver- 
ag« Mm« $800/ 

Cafl 785-317-0455 



785-537-7597 



houses, and apartments 

Washer/ dryer, central air ffiU!^ U^AfiP Eiedraon!!' 

AvaHabie now or tail No ^vo bath. quMt kicatton 

pets 785-B37-7080. ^„ KSU Washw/ tJryer, 

ONE AND Ihree-lMd- Art: No smoking/ pets 

rooms, uUHUe* p^M. June 785-539-8553 



Ing, J750 per month Call (,ours It mandatory App* 
KSU FoundalJon el ^■^ns can be obtained 
785-532-7569 or ^^ r(|,^ County Cierks 

785-532-7S41 Qlliee, 110 Courthouse porturaty Empioyer, 

KS 



washer/ dryer Near cam- 



oampua. 



pus and ctty part., August ^O^" ™ flv«^bedr«ims. 

1 785-532-9564 <*<> "^Ih, waahar/ dryw, 

_^ central air, 

Ttn??mT7F7nna: ctose to 

TWO bath duplaji, hrw car 78S-532-9S64 

garage, washer/ dryer, ^^^^^^_ 

very well matntained FOUR-BEDROOM AND fenl-apm,«Mn 

Available June 1. tV3Q/ siit-tiedroom houses. 

month, 821 MIsakm Close to campus and Ag 

785-776-9260 glevine Parkirtg tna laun- 



THREE-BEDROOM. P>«"- Manhattan. 
TWO tialh, one mita west «6S02. or viait our iiwb- 
ot campus Washer and *"'■ *flW»fJlwyCOuntl(K».- 
dryer provkfed, $1000 per WW P«ey County la an 
equal opportunAy em- 



pBrtment. 203t Poynli Av- 
enue. Applteatk>ns ac- 
cepted until potittons are 
filled. Apply to Manhattan- 
work flexible Ogden USD 383, 2031 ^aP5 LANbSSXMklft is 
Poynu Avenue, Manhal- i^^^^ j^, (^p^ndable 
**"■ JiS, ,. ^ »^ motivated full and part 
^^. ?^;-.-?' "^ ti™ *wlP Competmve 
wages, fiexable hours 



MATH rbACHEH: USD 
378 Is accepUng appNca- 
nans for a high adtool 



month 785-313-7473 



THREE-BEDROOM 
JUNE, July. August, Al- 
liance Proparty Manage- 

m«it 785 -539-4 357, wyfw,- 



ptoyer 



BANK TELLER Immedi- 
ate opening for full-time 
front line and/ or drive^up 
teller Looking for outgo- 
ing, energetk: , profes- 
sional, service oriented 
Phor banii ot 



Must tM 18 with OL Apply 
by e-truii tapnrrigalionSs- 

Becky PuKz 

tipijtu # usd378 com 
785-485-4000 



at VILLAGE INN, join our 

or team I Now hiring fuH-tlfrve 

arKJ part-time servers and 

^B IVHts and part-time cooiiB 

and at our Manhattan, KS 

restaurant Competitive 



AND three-bed- dry 785-539-5800 

rooms TWobtockatoewn- F o LI R - B E D R O 6 M 

pua June and August ^oygg p,^^ ^^ ^g^. 
leases No pets, laundry ^wga backyard Cen- 

hook-ups, central «(r ^,| ^^, ^, ^^ ,„^ 
$295/ bedioom ^ 

785-336-1124 



or pets Wired lor tiot tub 
August lease SHOO/ 
month 1520 Hartford CONI>05 



TWO-BEDROOMS 

JUNE, July, Augusi Al- peison 

llanee Properly Manage- cash handling exponence Hardware 

fi«anl,7B5-539-4367,yiy«(.- is a plus but not required, - 

rflfn-flpriLcom f<"^ f""' *"* *•»* 

Great hours Great t>erw- 
flts. Apply at Kansas Stale 
Bank, 10 10 Westkiop. 
Sale-Houses Manhattan Equal Oppor- 

tunity Employer. 
SALE 



PART-TIME cashier 
sales esBOCiate needed 

Must be avallabia wages, friendly envimn- 

evsnlngs and weekends ment, great tranelits and 

Apply at Midwest Ace opportunities lor advence- 

800 Tuttle ment Apply m person at 

Creek B(vd |^e Manhattan Village Inn, 

-^^-^^^^•'^^— 204 Tuttto Creak Blvd. 

PLAY SPORTS I Have EquW Opportunity Em- 



lun' Save money' Maine pkiyer 
camp needs lun kwng i ai q j 

counsekxs to leach All "I'r.Jl'^'^ ''''"''", 

land, adventure and water ^OM, PAID suivoy takers 



TWO-eEDROOM base^ month 1520 Hartford CONIWS FOR SALE. BARTENDINQi $300 a 

ment apartment Washer/ Road 785 759 3S20 Two and three -tradroom day potential No expen- 

(iryer. No pels WOO/ four BEDROOM ONE ^'*'"^ " * ''12,650 cdlo- ance necessary Training 

TTJ^^^ f^ '«* >^«> '" «"' 900 ?,'. w/™ '••'='>'" ^"""^ '='" 

Availabte Aunutl 1. 1211 ^^, j„^ |,^ 785-537-2096. 

Washer/ dryer, central air 



1211 
Thurston 795-888-3471 
call after 

7p.m 



1-800-985-6520 8x1. 144 



TWO-BE DROOtaS, 

bath, altaclMd garag*. garage 

Centra air, Bppliar>ces, 785-539-4949 

washer/ dryer. No pets 

August, trSO 

785-537-8420, 

765-341-5346. 



FABULOUS UPDATED CAMP TAKAJO Naples, 

condiliontng. Fenced t»ck- lour bedroom, one and Maine, noted tot pk:- 

^ yard, pets aUowed, S1200/ one -half bath, brick ranch tureaque lakefmnt iocs- 

one month. Party shack and home located west of Hon, exoepttonal lecllltles. 



included. 



KSU. St 49.900, Call Mkj- June through mkl 
785-538-6751 August. Counseky posi 

lions In tennis, baseball, time and a half loi over- 



sports. Great summer I 
CbU 888-844-8080, apply 
campcedar com 

PROGHAMMEft- CIVIC 
PLUS IS Ihe nsik>ns lead- 
ing provMer of City, 
County, and School web 
sites Full-time posluon tn 
Manhattan Microsoft ASP 
and SOL experience re- 
quired Sis 50/ hour plus 



needed In Manhattan 
100*v free to join Click on 
sun^eys 

WINTER/ SPRING Posi- 
lions Available. Earn up to 
1150 per day Eipenence 
not required. Undercover 
shoppers needed to judge 
retail and dining eataMsh- 
rrtems. Call 800722-4791. 





MANHATTAN CTTY On»- 
mnM 4114 MturM ev- 
ery peraon equal opportu- 
nity I nhouaingwlthouldlt- 
llnctlor) on account of 
race, sex, famlHal atalu*. 
military sUlus, disalrillty, 
religion, age, color, na- 
tional origin or ancestry. 
Violations should tie re- 
ported to Itw Dlrectof of 
Human Reaourcaa at Ctty 
Hall, <785>587-2440. 

1117 VATTIER New alt 
electric. Two-t»drooms, 
appliances tumiahed, no 
peta, Closa to campus, 
785-639-1975 or 

785-31 3-8292 

1219 KEARNEY One- 
bedroom, June, year 
lease. Water' trash pakt 
Next to campus, olf street 
parking No pets S350 
785-539-5136, 

1219 KEARNEY TWO- 
BEDROOMS August, 
year lease. Water/ trash 
paid. Next ic campus, off 
street panting No pets 
$660 785-539-5136 

ALLIANCE PROPERTY 
MANAGEMENT. One-bod- 
room June. Juty, August. 
785-539-4357 wY»w.l«m- 
•Oni.SHIl 

AVAILABLE JUNE 1, one- 
bedroom, large, clean. 
Only pay el«ctrk:«ly. Small 
pets alknved. Bak^ny, 
great kx:ation, $570/ 
month, 785-341-7289 

ONE, TWO, four, five-Oed- 
room apartments/ houses 
k)i June and August 
, 785-564-0857 



PARK PLACE Apan- 
rrwnts Tvto- Ijodrooms 
Pets wetcome. Summer/ 
Fall leasing. One- half 
m«e from KSU at Seth 
Child and Claftin 
785-539-2951 

THREE AlvID four-bed- 
room apartments avall- 
abia In August. Ck^se to 
campus. Water and trash 
paM Coin operated laun- 
dry. 785-537-7810, 
785-537-2255. 



Spacious 
Duplexes 

Custom bufit vvilh the 

K-State student 

tn mind 

Esch <)u|ila> f«aii>rs> walk-Ki 
(kiMU, ill lutchen 
appiiancsi, wsihsr/dnrei, oft 
fir««i pstkmg, phmia aim 
cable caniwctiCHii Ki e«ity 
room, »cur#v lighunf, trsih 
and Iswn care 

S«curiiv dtpostt IS the ssme 
ti one moniti's iSiit f lis 
ieaupsnod begins August 1 
lot one ye It 

4 fledrooma. 2 Baths 
1.3D0 84. Ft, 
ONLY l1,1M/m«. 



Sorry, No Ptn! 

Quiet Neighborhood, 

Convenient end Close 

to Campus 

Dayi 31S-e7B1 



ONE, TWO. three, and 
Ii3ui -bedroom spattments 
Cloee to campus and ag- 
glaviHe, Pandng arK) laun- 
dry, 785-539-5600 

ONE, TWO. three, tour, 
five, alk bedroom apart 
ment/ houasa next to cam 
pus. Washer/ dryer, cen 
tiat air No P 
T«6-Sar-70M. 

ONE- THREE-BED- 

ROOMS, near campus 
August lease, pets ok 
785-776-2051 . 

ONE -BEDROOM APART- 
MENTS in quiet sli-pi«x 
at «81l Piatt, AvaHatHe 
June tat Unfumlahed, 
central air, parking, water 
and trash pak). No pats 
$375 per irranth. Call KSU 
Foundation at 

786-532-7589 or 

785-532-7541 

ONE-BEDROOM TO five- 
t>odrooms Apartments, 
duplexes and homes 
Most Ctose to campus 
Some fartiter away. Jun» 
or Augusi leaaet. Check 
out our wedslte wwwr,- 
emeraldpropertymanag- 
ment com or can Emerskj 
Property Management 
785587.9000 tot more In- 
lormation. 

PARK PLACE Apart- 
ments One Bedrooms 
Summer/ fad leasing Pets 
nelooim One- haH mile 
friim KSU at Selh Chik) 
and ClaWn. 785-53»-2951 . 




TWO, THREE and tour- 
tjedrooms. ckisa to cam- 
pus, central air, dish- 
washer, laundry faciidias. 
Ho pets, available Febru- 
ary 1 785 539-0866 

TWO- BEDROOM apart 
ment Newty renovated 
Available June 1. $800, 
two blocks to campus and 
Aggieville, Dishwasher, 
central air, laundry ladllty. 
443-867-7527, 

TWO-BEDROOM SPE- 
CIAL at Park Ftace Apart- 
ments. $495 rent plus tree 
cal>le through July 07 
785-539-2951 . 

TWOBEDROOM, 
CLOSE to oampus Per- 
sonal washer/ dryer. $045- 
$875/ month, 

785-34 1 -4496 

TWO-BEDROOM many 
sizes and pnces June or 
August 785-341-0686 

TWO- BEDROOMS ALL 
blllspad, 765 341 4496 

VERY NICE three*ed- 
room, two bath apartirient. 
Three blocks to Aggieville 
822 Fremont AHordable 
utikties, August 1, 
795-313-1807 

WHY RENT WHEN YOU 
CAN BUY? CondOB tei 
sale Two and three-t>ed- 
room starting at $112,650 
coltegiatevllla.com 
785-537-2096 

WILDCAT VILLAGE. Avail- 
able June or August four- 
tiedroom, two bath, 
waaher/ dryer, storm 
room. $1400, Cable paki 
78S-T76-242S Ot 

785-S4$-37e0, www.vil- 
lage-rantals.com 



prel«»5^^ 



THREE FEMALE rooin- rBrt-»m,COm 

mates needed lor fall 

2007 Ckise to campus, 

washer/ dryer, no pets 

$280 plus ullNtles, Can 

Jenna7e5-479.1430 



FOUR-BEDROOM, TWO 
and one-half bath, study. 
August 1. $975 par 
month Knight Real Es- 
tate Cad 785-539-5394 

P 6 U R - 5 1 & R 5 6 M christian 

JUNE, July. Augusi Al- seeks two lemale room- ^g^j,, ,raini^, newspa 

llarice Property Manag*- mates starting tail 2007 pg, pbotogra[*y, video, 

ment 785-539-4357 wy«i.- August to May lease. New woodworking. ceramica/ 

throe-tiedroom. two tjath patter^, crafts, tine arts. 

house with washier/ dryei 



basketbaN, soccer, 

lacrosse, goll, flag loot- 
baU, roiier hockey, swim- 
ming, sailing, water skiing, 
gymnastics, dance, horse- 
FEMALE back tiding, arciiery. 



lime Benefits Include 
Health, Dental, PaM Holi- 
days. Paid VacatKin, and 
40 IK rnatching Email re- 
sume in Microsoft Word or 
text format lo jatw@C>vic- 
pluscom 



enamel, nature study, ra- 
dio/ electronics, theater 
oostumer, piano atxompa' 
nisi, music instrumental 




FOUR-BEOROOM three 

baths (Auguat) $1^0, 

nk>e, Waaher/ Dryer 

hookups, offstreel park- 

ing. greet tocatmn, no ""'■"■"""' 

pets/ smoiiing 

785-S32-a25« 



ONE HOUSE^ 2M1 ^.,^,^ ^„,. 

^*'"T1 K J'^"^: "«« CairB47.975-»4«4 
room, iwo tialh, June 1 

isssa Two, hglt-duptaxes, FEMALE HOUSEMATE 

with four-bedroom, hvo No drtnKmg/ smoiung 

baffi, washer/ dryer in- $295/ month One-third ist. tiackpacklng 

eluded $1200' month, no uUtttles, washer/ dryer, Au- cUmbing, canoeing/ icayak 

pets 795-539-2357 or Qust lease ami- 

785-341-8576, ca313®ksuadu. 

6^4£ T ft lrv«.bed.oom ™S-S37-1484 

apartments and houses. MALE. WALK to class, all 



PROJECT MANAGER 
jewelry, copper CivicPlus has an opening 




our Manhattan head 
quarters otiice tor a tull- 
time project manager 
This challenging position 
roc^ entails managing multiple 
website redesign projects 
trom slan to Imish Posi- 



POOL TABLE for 
Good condition. 
786-564-1488. 



Cat 



Ctose 10 
785-539-1975 



campus 



furnisi>ed, tower level. 



Ing, I opes course, secre- 

lanal, nanny. Call Takajo •»" f«1"i'e8 anenlton to 

al 866-356-2267 Submit '*»'"''■ "** ^""V 1° "»" 

appkcation online at ««« '"""'P's «sks, pnori- 

lakaio com ^^ "^ deadlines and a 

^^^i_M— ^^^^^^— cheerful attitude. Training 

COMPLETE OUTDOORS ,5 provkied Bweflts In- 




Transportation 



or washer dryet withoul me 

let f*: smoking, dnniung. Inc seeking all positions ^lude health, dental, pakt 

pets, 785-539-1554 in landscape, imgatkjn, noiijays, paid vacation 

ftiOMMATE fj^dbfb ^'^ maintenance and 40t(k) matching 

__ _ _ until May 31 Rent $275/ 785-776-1930 gmati resume in text or 

FOUR-BEDROOM, TWO Mm Oote to canpua! month plus one -fourth utili- EASTER HELP needed at Word format to 



ONE-BEDROOM TO five- 
badroonis. Apartments, 
duplcxaa and homes 




bath duplex lor rent plus Sortie farther away, June **•* Washer/ dryer, dish- Manhattan Town Center lObsiScivicpius com 
study room. One-half or Augusi leases. Check "/esher in house Celt tocalion. Manager pay a^x^^^^^^ 
WocK trom KSU, Every- out our webstte www- 785-537-3737, $455/ weak, Easter Bunny PROJECT MANAGER 



SET OF oft road wheeta 
and tires for Toyota trudi, 
Mickey Thompson Classic 
Lock Wheels- 15x10 
Tiras are Qood Year 
Wrangler MT/R 3H1050 



785-537-3737, 

thing new, completely re- ameialdproperlymanag- ROOMMATES NEEDED M 50/ hour. Call Becky CivicPluS has an opening $500 OBO 31 6-304 -58S2 

modetod Including now ment com or call Emerald for two bedrooms in Five- 1 800-422-8987. „ our Manhattan head- 

hardwraod floors, now Property Management tMdroom twuse Next fall hARVE^ThELP wanted quarters otfkM for a lull- 

ftoor covBrtngs, new 785-587-9000 tot more in- Ctose to campus Outdoor (jne May through August *'"* PfO|ect Manager 

' '" pats weteome, p^y, ^n 785-587-1958. T^^ Chalienging position 



kitchen cabinets and appli- 
ances I even washer and 
dryer). Tra^h and lawn 
care included No pets 
$1400/ month, June pos- 
session Call Reglna at 
Emerald Property Man- 
agement 785-587-9000 



formation 

RENTAL HOUSE $800 6M-382-7241 
Ofie year lease June 
2007 to May 2008 Excel- 
lent distance to waiii to kl.^ 
campus. Call Mrs, Kim SutHecue 
913-681-9959 



evenings 



LOOKING 
roommates 



Management 
785-539-4357. wwwrent- 



room duplex. 500 

Laramie. $285 per room. 

Washer/ Dryer, apmcom 

785-410-2916 or 31X BEDROOM 



lent wages 785-564-2590 

able, motivaied indivwu- 
913-961-5929 



entails managing multiple 

website redesign projects 

KAY COMPANY in search froo, start to finish Posi- 
ot summer workers, tarm ,jon reguirss attention to 
experience needed Excel- (jgtail the ability lo man- 



FOB three (two kitchen) June, July, ffom campus, $200 00 per 
In four-bed- August Alliance Property month Call 



age muhipie task, pnon- 
iies and deadlines arKi a 
cheertui attitude Training, 
a provKled Benerits in- 
clude Health, Dental, Pato 



els for full-time or part 
,^_^ time seasonal positions m Holidays, Pato Vacation 
NEEDED our retail garden centei <md 401 (k) matching 
average wages 



785-447-0852 



THREE-BEOHOOM 
UNIT, tocated at 8/ 802 
North 5th, t«i pets. $975/ 
month, available June 1 
785-564-0372, 

WALK TO class. One, 
two, three, lour-t>edroom 
No smoking, no dnniung. 
nopals. 785-539-1554 



SUBLEASER .., 

lor Spring 2007 semester Above average wages Email resume In text Of 

(TWO $315/ month. Four-bad- commensurate with expe Word lomial to jobst*- 

Ju(y, Au- room apartment. First rience and abilities. Apply civicptus.oom 



SttsESto 



• 2000 College m»* 

• 1114 Framoflt* 

• BIBOMC** 



Pre-lease 

Today for 

Spring! 

Onty A fevAj 
Koines remain 

Amenitiei: 
•vyasher/Dryen or 

tiookupj available 
•On- Site Maridgement 
•Garaget Available 
*t*rlvate Fitness Center 
•Storm Center 
•Peaceful Garden 

Setting 
•EnormouiCknets 

M,i«*. ^H a fm, tamtam ItaM* 

t;gnir.ETQWW 

776-8080 

■ ■lltllllllf IMl 



few Spsces Ftemiiti for 

, ■Griduate Students 

• Upper Cilssmen 



• iiMI lOCMn • lnoSwiW'ins "li" 

• tetMiiiSnuiq 

• Oti'SieiMldil ■ JiUliQul(.iDUtl 

• PiniHFiaiaiCM* 

• AtuMMfita^inpt 



• Hm-finimiiiiofNI 
kMUniNCa «MMIst**(ii> 
'- ,csinVvc|i 

'.' >,»JinB(t9lKf 



r*^^laft 

WUTCHF.STFR PARK 

776-1118 

D< MmMs U11V1 0«^t 



rt»ai-r*^<irwfc#C.irtpl^af HCii [• . 




kitchen), June 

gust Alliance Property month's rent pakt, cheap in person at 11524 Land 
Management, utilittas 913-495-2556 or scape Lane, St, George, 
785-539-4357 www.reni- 913-406-1034, Kansas 785-494-2418 Or 

"P^^'" THHEE-BEOROOM ^65- 776-0397 

APARTMENT hwo bkicks HOWE LANDSCAPE Inc 
to campus, ckisa lo Ag- has several positions 
availat^ for our landscap- 
ing, Imgation and mowing/ 
maintenar>ce craws This 
IS for full time and part 
time help, with flex tile 
sctveduies tor students, 
four hour 



';^ (^ 



^lU a 



'^€^l4Jl 



The perfect 

way to ttart 

yourdtty! 




1420 

Bet cli wood Ttrrscc 

New Apanmeni 

Lg, 2 & 3 Bpdrooms 

r»Balhi 

Washer/Dryer 

Energy E Hie lent 

On a Wedded 

Stclpited 2 Acre Let 

with Creek 



S740 & $B85 
341 4024 



1015 PIERRE V^ry nice, 
four-bedroom. Fenced in 
tiack yard. Spactous 
rooms. Washer/ dryar. 
July or August lease. AJI 
pets considered. Chris, 
78*- 770-2181. 



1310 N. Illh, Two-bed 
room. June toase. No 
pels, dam to campus 
785-539-1975 or 

785-313-8292, 



1417 NICHOLS, lour-bed- 
rooms. family room 1909 
Kenmar. three-tiedrooms. 
Both two bathrooms, 
washer/ dryer, garage 
game room, fenced yard/ 
patm 785-539-1177 



SC2 FREMONT, three-bed- 
iDom. one balh. no pels 
Avallatila June 1 
785-539-1975 or 

785313-8292 



AVAILABLE JUNE 1. 
Three-tiedmom house to- 
cated at 1501 Harry 
Road Two blocks west of 
campus, central air, 
washer/ dryar. tenced 
yard, 785-539-3672, 



WILDCAT 

PROPERTY 

MANAGEMENT] 

537-2332 

8* & Moro 

2BR $850 

3BR- $1,300 

4BR- $1,700 

U"& Fremont 

4BR - 2'/. Both 

$1,650 

Anderson Village 

1 BR $525 
2BR - $700-725 



1501 Poyntz 
Hou$e - $750 
38R - 2 BolK 



1 509 Poyntz 

House - $600 

IBR- IBoth 



315 Poyntz 
IBR $650 



Fall Leasing 



Rant $300/ per 
son Call 78S- 221 -6680 

TWOBEDROOM APART 

MENT. walk to campus 

$620/ month includes utiii 

ties 785-275-1409 leave prtterabty 

message 




E nt nioyrtt wit C ar«?ci s 




blodts ot time. Applicants 
must be 18 years or age 
and have a valid drivers li- 
cense Starting wage is 
$8 00/ hour Apply ttiree 
ways, in person Mdhday 
through Fnday at 12780 
Madison Fid in RMey: cat 
795-485-2857 tO Oblain 
an application: or e-mail 
us at howtland@kan«as ' 
net 

JOIN THE K- State Online 
THE COLLEGIAN cannol team at the Off km ot Medi- 
vertty the financial polwi- ated Educalton and con- 
lial of advartlewirtwila ki tnbute to a vanety of im- 
the EmptoyntenbCar^er portant K- State vneb sites 
claatiflcatlort. Reader* and appltoations Candi- 
are advtaed to approach dates must tie motn/ated, 
any such bualneeeoppof- capatite ot loamkig new 
tunlly wHh rm- skills quickly, soH-di- 

(ontble cau- rectod. able to work at 

lion. Th« Collagian urgea least 15 hours a weelt, 
our raad«rs to contact the and willing to devote at 
Better Buslneaa Burewi. ieasi a year to Iha posi- 
801 SE Jelferton, lion Working with web 
Topdia KS 66607-1190. lechnologies m an ot1«» 

ADMINISTRATIVE Asili III!''?!' I.n ^t^'STj! 
TANT Newiorks Plus^the ^ ^^ anvironment 

leader m praviding busi- ^^^^^ ^^^^ ^,^ ^ 

$7.00 For more infomiB- 
tion email us al omeol- 
ficeOkau.edu 

7m 



providing tHisi- 
ness computer services, 
has a fullttme p09«lk>n 
availabte in Manhattan, 
KS This challenging posi- 
tion requires the ability to 



mb^kl help 
handle multiple tasks and needed lor working in 
prioritiaa while mairitBin- greenhouse and tree pack- 
ing a poMttW Wtd arter- Ing Four hour bkxA tinie 
getic gHfluitt. 112/ hour, tequired 8:00am to 12- 
full-timo only, opportuni- 00pm or tOOpm lo 5- 
ties for advancement E- DOp m Monday through 
mail resume in Microsoft Friday $8 00/ hour Apply 
Word or text format to job- st Kansas Fntest Service, 
s li nelwortisplua com , 26 i Clatlln FU. 

I 



Pregnancy 
Testing Center 

539-3338 



su|do|ku 

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every column, and every 3x3 box 

contains the digits I through 9 

with no repeats. 



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ARTS I ENTERTAINMENT | SEX | FOOD | YOUR LIFE 

THE EDGE 



Tuesday. Feb. 27, 2007 

SEX ED 

Sexual health advice 
from the experts at SHAPE 

Toilet seats 
not good STD 
transmitters 



ByMcttCombM 

wKh Lindsay Gallon 

SOUlkL HIUTH AWARENtSS PCU EDUCATORS 

The panic sets in. 
You usually wouldn't resent to 
such a disgusting choice, but it's 
a dire emergency. This moment 
could make a break in the Hoover 
Dam look like spilled milk. You 
stumble into the putrid stall, blue- 
faced and knees crossed. 

You take a deep breath, count 
to three and sit down on the public 
toilet Your mind is racing with 
thoughts of what diseases you 
could contract. 

One of the most common myths 
about sexually transmitted diseases 
is that they can be contracted 
from toilet seats. But could that 
really happen? Are gonorrhea and 
chlamydia lurking on the porcelain 
thrones of public restrooms? 

This myth has been around for 
awhile. A yoiuig lady sits down on 
a public toilet to do her business, 
and a week later needs penicillin to 
dear up a case of venereal disease. 

While one-in-two sexually ac- 
tive college students contract an 
STD, it is highly improbable any of 
those will come ftfom a toilet seat 
Think back to the last time you 
used a toilet Just how intimate 
were you getting with that seat? 
I'd hope you would see the point 
without further explanation. 

One must consider the weak- 
nesses of STD-causing agents, 
Accwding to the Mayo Clinic 
Web site, "The microorganisms 
- bacteria and viruses - that cause 
STDs tend to be highly sensitive 
to environmental conditions and 
can't survive outside the human 
body for very long," This means 
when it comes to chilling out on a 
toilet seat, these li'l buddies die. 
Many might wonder if there 
are exceptions to this. A study by 
lYudy Larson of the UCLA school 
of medicine found the herpes virus 
can survive up to 72 hours on a 
toilet seat. Although. Larson had 
to physically place the virus there. 
This goes back to how intimate 
you are getting with the toilet seat 
Another common response to 
the issue of toilet seat transmission 
might be, "What about crabs?" 
Crabs can survive away from 
their host longer; however, they 
enjoy nestling up with our warm- 
ness and die without it. 

Also, unlike most STDs, a crab 
infestation does not only come 
from sex. Nonsexual transmi^ion 
of crabs also is possible in rare 
cases, according to the Centers for 
Disease Control 

A person can get crabs from 
sleeping in an infested bed, using 
infMted towels or wearing infested 
clothing. 

Another common misconcep- 
tion is that crabs, or genital lice, 
can "crawl" or "jump" into your 
genitals The CDC states crabs 
don't have the proper feet to walk 
on slick a toilet seat. So unless your 
toilet seat is far different from what 
most of us are used to, this too is 
highly improbable 

It is unlikely to get an STD from 
a toilet seat, but other bacteria and 
germs do breed there Never sit on 
one that b obviously soiled or wet, 
and always wash your hands after 
doing your business 



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iriNolMSMd tAtid by Caral KftNWly, 

SWtSrttf nCIIDI pfVfnotiORIItUflMHiMn 

Cento. H jm would Iw SHAPE t« aMwcr |«w 
tniMl NnWi quHtion, pl««« {ontact SHtfl 

atriufwito.idu. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Half baked 



Page 12 

NEW RELEASES 




Photo IlluitraUoni by ChristoplMr HaiMwinck*! | (OLIEGIAN 



Artificial, natural tanning present skin cancer risks 



■yXfMnHedgw 

KANSAS STATE COllEGI«N 

The cold of winter and lack of sun- 
shine bring white, pasty bodies to cam- 
pus and leave many searching for ways 
to get a bronzed tan. 

Besides basking in the sun, other 
ways to tan include tanning beds, 
airbrush tanning, tanning lotions - 
even tanning pills While the options 
vary in popularity and price, the U.S. 
Food and Drug Administration warns 
against some of the products. 

The FDA encourages people to 
avoid using tanning beds because the 
beds emit ultraviolet rays that often 
are "much more intense than those 
produced by the sun." according to the 
FDA Web site, wwm.fda.gm. 

the FDA warns UV radiation risks 
from the sun are the same for tanning 
beds. The rays can cause skin cancer, 
damage the immune s}^tem and cause 
premature aging of the skin. These ef- 
fects mi^t not appear immediately, 
and damage to the skin can accumu- 
late over a period of years 

However, these warnings do not 
keep customers away from the numer- 
ous salons surrounding campus. 

Jessica Heuback, sophomore in 
open option, said she doran't tan regu- 
larly but likes to do it in the winter, 

"1 just do it every once in a while, 
because I dont want to get in the rou- 
tine of doing it," she said. "But 1 like to 
have color." 

For people who choose to visit tan- 
ning salons, the FDA suggests using 
short exposure times to build up the 
tan, and to tan no more than twice a 
week 

Riki Darrah. Sun Connections Inc 
employee, said the salon has three dif- 
ferent tanning bed options: the super 
bed, mega bed and ultra bronzer. 

Darrah said the ultra bronzer has 
the strongest bulb wattage of the beds 
and filters out 95 percent of the UV 
rays that cause sunburn. 

She said moisturizing the skin and 
not burning are the best ways to main- 
tain a tan If the skin docs bum, it's 
best to use Aloe vera so the skin does 
not peel. 

She said the salon reconunends 
customers use the super and mega 
beds every other day at most, because 



skin needs to be able to rest and ab- 
sorb the tan 

The salon encourages customers to 
use the ultra bronzer bed three to four 
times in a 7- to 10-day period, and then 
twice a month to maintain the tan, she 
said. 

Darrah said the salon does nut sell 
self-tanning lotions that don't require 
tanning beds. 

"1 don't like them because they're 
uneven and orange," she said. 

People should not use 
tanning beds tf: 

■ They sunbunt easily and don't tan. 

■ Utey get frequent cold sorev, beause the 
UV radiation might amt them to occur man 
fifquently. 

■ Tbey W taking medicines that can make 
them more sensitive to lAf nys. 

Jenny Olsen, junior in psychology 
and employee at Bronze Image Tan- 
ning Salon, said the salon has four dif- 
ferent levels of tanning beds that differ 
in the amount of wattage the beds use. 

Olsen said the salon sells different 
types of lotions that can be used in the 
tanning beds, as well as some that can 
be used outdoors without sunscreen 

She said some of the lotions have 
ingredients designed to help raise the 
levels of melanin in the skin for a bet- 
ter tan 

"Those arc my favorite, especially if 
you have paler skin," she said, "They 
don't streak your skin at all" 

While many tanning salons like 
Bronze linage and Sun Connections 



only offer tarming beds, others have 
the option of airbrush tarming 

Mandy Claeys, senior in marketing 
and employee of Salon Essentiab, said 
the salon offers airbrush tanning along 
with tanning beds as an alternative 
for people who don't want to expose 
themselt^s to the UV radiation. 

Claeys said airbrush tanning is in- 
stant, while the tanning beds take time 
to build the tan, 

"It's something they can actually 
get on the spot, like if they're going to 
an event like a wedding or prom," she 
said. 

She said airbrush tanning takes 
less than 10 minutes and can last for 
a week to 10 days with use of the right 
products 

Claeys said the salon sells extenders 
and body wash that help maintain the 
airbrush tan 

According to the FDA Web site, the 
spray-on tan uses the chemical dihy- 
droxy acetone, or DHA, 

"The chemical DHA interacts with 
the dead surface cells in the epidermis 
to darken skin color and simulate a 
tan, and the result usually last for sev- 
eral days," according to the site. 

The site restricts the use of DHA 
and warns that it should not be in- 
haled, mgcsted or exposed to the eyes 

Another option for tanning is tak- 
m% tanning pills The FDA has not ap- 
proved these pills and warns against 
their use because some contain the 
color additive canthaxanthin, which 
can turn the skin orange and brown 
and cause serious health problems if 
ingested in targe amounts, according 
to the Web site 




'Saints' offers dark, gritty look at life of troubled teen 



"A Guide to Recognizing 

Your Saints" 

••••^ 

IWD r*vl*w by Efltm liux 

Dito Montiel's "A Guide to Rec- 
ognizing Your Saints" delves into the 
life of an adolescent boy in 1986 in 
Astoria, a neighborhood in Queens, 
N.Y, Flashing between present day 
and the 1980s, we see a young Dito 
(Shia LaBeouO watching his friends 
end up dead, on drugs or in prison. 

In 2005, Dito {Robert Downey 
Jr.) is called home by his mother (Di- 



anne Wiest) to take his dying father 
(Chazz Palminteri) to the hospital. 

The relationship between father 
and son is tumultuous at best The 
scenes that follow are heartfelt and 
gritty interactions between Dito and 
his so-called 'saints," people who 
never left him even though he left 
them years before 

The film gives an edgy, tenacious 
portrayal of the characters 

Dito's best friend, Antonio 
(portrayed brilliantly by Channing 
T^tum). would take a bullet for him, 
and his girlfriend, Laurie, a wonder- 
fully fresh performance by Melonie 



Diaz, loves him with all her heart. 

Rash forward to Antonio paying 
for sins committed in his past and 
Laurie still living in Queens and tell- 
ing Dito exactly how it is. 

Downey Jr. gives a great perfor- 
mance as he deals with the inner 
turmoil of being thrust back into his 
old life Montiel's first effort as a di- 
rector is brilliant. He portrays Dito's 
life in a dark and troubled way. but 
leaves you rooting for him in the 
end. 

The dark, dingy film Is a fantastic 
account of these characters and it 
draws the viewer into their world. 




Dean (, BfittJ, ■Back Numb*n' 
David Bromtierg, "Try Me One More Time" 
M.F. Hot 4 &$, 'Live at Jimmy's* 
John Denver, The bsential kihn IJenwr" 
Do Make Say Think, "You You're a History 
In Rust' 

Uaynard Fet^uton, "Wow: Fomtitlve Years' 
I eilltngvainrWCoor V 

! Sev.Tinwthy Wright 'JesuiJesB,leiU5" 
I Paul Brown, "White Sand* 

Matt Werti, 'Everything In Between' 
The FMUng.'Twelw Stops & Home* 

DVDs 




"Stranger than FictlM' 

Karen Efhel (Emma Thompson) is an 
•Mhor wiling her blest novel about an iso- 
lated man named Haroid Cnck (Will Ferrell). 
What she donn't know Is that her ktioiullzed 
dvaraaer is leal. The real Harold Crick ts an IftS 
agent who has lived a dull existence and one 
day begins to heai Karen's voice as she natratet 
what she puts or paper to what Harold has 
and K doing. Harold hnds trouble when he 
hean that Karen plans to kill him 

"BobDyUnifion'tltokBad' 

In spring ] 965, Bob DyUn, 23, a piKyHh 
tmubador, spent three weeks in England. DA. 
Peanetukef's camera (ol lowed him from aii- 
port to hall, horn hotel room to public home, 
from conversation to concert loan Bae; and 
Donovan, among othen, are were hand. If s 
the period when Dylan shifted from acoustic to 
electric a transition that not ail fam, including 
Baez, applauded. From the opening sequerKe 
of Dylan hoMIng up wonls to the soundtrack's 
"Subtenanean Homesick Blues,' Dylan is play- 
ful and enignutk. 

'AGoedVMT* 

A British Investment broker (Russdl 
(rowe) inherttshisuncle'i chateau (Albert 
f inney) and vineyard in Provence, where he 
spent mudi of his childhood. He discoven a 
new, laid-back lifestyle as he tries to renovatt 
the estate to be sold 

TtiMdo<» D In The Pkk of Dtftkiy* 

In Venice Beach, naive Midwestemer JB [Jack 
I Bladt) bonds with local slacl;e( KG (KyteGass), 
and they fonn the nxk band TcfHciMD D. Set- 
ting out to become the WDrtfi greUnt band is 
no easy feai, so they set out to steal what could 
be the answer to their prayers — a migKil 
guitar pid. 




tHwitnatkHiiwIthGtr 

The ime story o( Neale Donald Wibdi 
IHenryCiemyiinspiredandch anged the 
Iwes o( millioni wortdwide The journey begins 
after he unexpectedly breaks his neck ir a 
car accidem and loses his )ob. Soon alter, we 
witness his transformation from everyday guy 
to homeless bom stnjggling jun to sUy alive. 
The movie follows Neale's ey*-opentng roilei 
coaster ride through his battle to get enough 
food, make fnends and regain his tife. 

TlwHHitofthtGanw' 

The documentary captures the passion and 
enerigyof a Seattle high uhoci girls' basketball 
team, the Roosevell Roughiidets, the «- 
centric ity of their unorthodoi coach, and the 
inoediWe trije story of one ptayw^ fight to 
play ttw game she kwes. 

TV on DVD 

iGirthlendi — The Complete Rrn Season' 
'Magnum Rl. — The Complete Siirth 
Season' 

-NR Super Bowri Ul — InAmapolii Coiti 
Chantpionthip* 

— wwm.amtiar,nm 



S A S STAT 




INSIDE 

K-State left Stillwater, 
Okla., lUesday ni^t 
with a disappointii^ 
84-70 loss. 




www.btatecoUegian.com 



Wednesday, February 28, 2007 



Vol. 1 11. Na 112 



Blazing a trail 

Former K-State football player shares memories of integration 



■yShalUEIIk 

KANSAS MATE (DIUQAN 

When Ron Prince, K-State's 
head football coach, searched for 
the words to describe Veryl Swit- 
zer, he found two: "a pioneer." 

Switzer was the Tirst black 
scholarship football player to grad- 
uate from K-State, and the Green 
Bay Packers selected him with the 
NFL's fourth-draft pick in 1954. 

Prince said Switzer and other 
black athletes contributed tremen- 
dously to enable him to be in the 
position he is today. 

"They are truly pioneers," Prince 
said. "The experiences they bad are 
some that some of us will not be 
able to comprehend." 

RURAL UPBRINGINGS 

Coming from the tight -knit com- 
munity of Nicodemus. Kan., Swit- 
zer said his first class at K-State 
had more people than his entire 
town's population. 

"There were over 200 students 
in my freshman lecture class," he 
said "The numbers were just over- 
whelming." 

Nicodemus was the first pri- 
marily black rural settlement west 
of the Mississippi River. Located 
in Graham County, Switzer said it 
served as a place for former slaves 
to improve their quality of life, raise 
their families and have a chance to. 
own farmland. 

He said he explored his pas- 
sion for competition in a one-room 
schoolhouse, where rows of desks 
divided kindergarten through 
eighth grade. 

"Everyone was in one room 



Everyone was in your business," he 
said "You couldn't get away with 
anything - we were always com 
peting" 

He said resources were lim- 
ited, and in elementary school, 
there was not even a football to 
play with, forcing children to use a 
round ball 

"We just had to make use of 
what we had," he said. 

He said these experiences con- 
tributed to making him a humble 
man 

Five miles from Nicodemus, 
Switzer attended Bogue High 
School, where he played both of- 
fensive and defensive positions for 
the football team. 

After an outstanding high school 
football career, Switzer was offered 
a full scholarship to play football at 
K State in 1950 

"Nicodemus was my world." he 
said. "1 didn*t know too much about 
any place outside of the area." 

ON A MISSION 

Before coming to college, the 
people of Switzer's community 
held him accountable to behave, he 
said. 

"My preacher told me, 'Don't 
you come back until you've got a 
degree,'" he said. 

He said he had to present him- 
self in a "certain light " because of 
the rote he had integrating the Big 
7 Conference footbaU teams. 

"1 had to be competitive in both 
academics and athletics because 
all my teammates were white," he 
said, 

WSWITIERPaftT 




CtirlMaphcr H*n«wlnck«l i (0(.ltOIAN 

Vcryl Switur was th« first Mack f(»Mball playar on schol*rthip to graduat* 
from K-State and make It to the NFL. 5 witter was the fourth player selected Ijy 
the Gteen Bay Packers in the 19S4 drah. 



Former "mic man" set higher standards for K-State students and fans 



By Parker Rohm 

KANSAS STATE COILECIAN 

K'State fans could not wait for 
the men's basketball team to take 
the court at Aheam Field House 
during the late 1960s. Minutes be- 
fore tipoff, fans would chant a de- 
mand to "Bring on the Cats." 

"It was always really nice," said 
Larry Dixon, former K-State "mic 
man." 

"Most of the time, the Cats came 
out second, so therefore, the visit- 
ing team was coming out when we 
were hollering, 'Bring on the Cats' 
And then when the Cats came out, 
the fieldhouse would just erupt." 

Dixon was the first and only 
"mjc man" in the Big 8 Conference. 
He took on the role in 1968. 

The "Bring on the Cats" chant 
began during his tenure at K-State, 
and he did his part to spread it. 

During football and basket- 
ball games, Dixon would assist the 
cheerteading squad in getting the 
crowd active While most yell lead- 
ers had a megaphone, he was band- 
ed a microphone. 

""Now we have the video board 
during timeouts," said David Yoder, 
residence life coordinator of Mar- 
latt HaU and 1973 K-State graduate 
"We used to have Larry Dixon" 

Yoder has been a men's basket 
ball season ticket holder since his 
freshman year. 

" It was like church in those days," 



Yoder said. "Everyone was working 
together. He was very charismatic, 
and he really made a difference." 

But Dixon said the excitement 
during games was a joint effort. 

"The fans cooperated so well," 
Dixon said. "You could hear a pin 
drop, and then all of a sudden, when 
I said when to, the place would just 
explode," 

While part of his job was to join 
in with cheers, he also motivated 
fans when the team was losing, 

"Sometimes I had to sit and talk 
to them when things weren't going 
well," Dixon said. "I'd tell them, 
"You can"t sit on your hands You've 
got to get up and help the ball team 
to become motivated'" 

Dixon also was one of the first 
black pep squad members. 

"It was an important break- 
through for the time," said Lodis 
Rhodes, a founding member and 
president of K-State's Black Student 
Union. "But very quickly, it was just 
routine operation, in part because 
they were so good at it " 

Rhodes, who also was on the 
football team, was involved in an 
effort to start a black pep squads 
with males and females. 

"It was black athletes giving 
voice to an issue that was important 
for not only them but for other stu- 
dents," Rhodes said. 

But when Rhodes approached 
Dixon about being a yetl leader, 
Dixon said he had no interest. 




St*v*n Doll I COLLEGIAN 

Larry Dixon usmI to b« knawn as the "mic man" from 19AB to 1974 wh)l« 
ht attended K-State. During football and basketball games, Dixon assisted 
cheerleaders to get the crowd active. 



"When he first asked. 1 said no 
way," Dwon said "They had tryouts 
during a weekend when a lot of the 
people that were interested were 
going home, so they wanted me to 
show up so it didn't look bad, 

"So I went, and they, for some 
reason, decided they maybe wanted 
to try this 'mic man' thing, and they 
had a few of us try out for that" 

Dixon said he made his debut 
at a football game against the 
University of Kansas in 1968. 

"There weren't any blacks on 
the field cheerteading or anything 
like that, and then all of a sudden, 
at the next home game, there were 
three," he said. "I think that the fans 



had such a good time that nobody 
noticed," 

Dixon offers advice for the 
re introduction of older traditions to 
K State fans. 

"It's just not cheering when a 
basket is scored," he said, "When 
we're down by 15 and need a 
defensive stop to get back in the 
game, the fans have to be the ones 
to start pumping ourselves up 

"IVhen we were in Aheam Field 
House, we could be down by 2S, 
but we felt like we could come back 
and win the game The fans felt like 
we were going to come back and 
win the game, and they'd be very 
disappointed if we didn't," 



Gas prices 
to rise before 
spring break 

BytratiKlivg 

KANSAS STATE COlLtGIAN 



Driving around Manhattan will 
continue to cost more for drivers 
as gasoline prices are projected to 
increase 

According to kamasgtuprices. 
com, the average unleaded gasoline 
price m Manhattan was $2,3S 
per gallon at press time, a 39-cent 
increase from a month ago. 

Michael Babcock, economics 
professor, said he believes the 
increase in gasoline prices stems 
from the weather conditions in the 
northeast part of the country, 

"The northeast depends on fuel 
oil for a lot of their heat," Babcock 
said, "They had some really bad 
winter storms up there in New York, 
buried under six feet of snow, so 
the demand for oil has increased 
while there were a few refinery shut 
downs," 

llie increase in demand and the 
decline of production of gasoline 
has forced the price increase in 
recent weeks, 

According to The Tlu 
Foundation's Web site, after adding 
taxes to the price, the price of a 
gallon is $2,24 prior to markup. 

Increases in gasoline prices have 
forced many students to change 
their spring break plans, 

Ibm Grund, junior in pre- 
architectural engineering, said he 
has chosen to spend spring break in 
Manhattan rather than driving back 
to Minnesota 

"It is a long drive back home for 
me so it makes sense for me to stay 
in Manhattan instead of spending 
the money to go back home for a 
week," Grund said 



Panel answers 
race questions 
from students 



By Austin Appio 

KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

A panel of five black women 
answered a variety of questions from 
students Tuesday in the K-State 
Student Union Courtyard. 

""Students asked questions about 
what made us proud about our 
heritage and if that made us the 
person that we are," said Letitia 
T^juba, senior in political science. 

Students also asked questions 
about racial stereotypes and black 
influence in politics, 

"We are very distinct and different 
women who have our own different 
attitudes and views towards life," 
T^juba said 

T^juba said she believed it is 
important to get the word out. 

""Some people do not believe that 
some of the things are going on,'" she 
said ")ust last month there was a 
racially-themed party where people 
wore saggy clothing and stuffed their 
pants with pillows to make their 
butts look big " 

$«cOUESTI(MSf>tgef 



« 



Today's forecast 

Afternoon showers 
High:S8 Low: 34 



INSIDE 



JAt i stmll atound umpiss and y(M will 
encMjntei txiildln^s ind murtis you've protubly 
new seen before. Flip inskic and re«] about Itiui 
wch placet 

SMtttryfaftl 



CAMPUS NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 



Lecture to cover 
daylight-saving time 

K- Slate rnfo«n«tion tethnolog]^ 
experts will dlKuss the changn of 
this year's ddylK|ht-Mving time at 
1 :M p m. today in Room 21 2 of the 
K-State Student Union. Dayllght- 
savings time h being eitencW in 
the United Sutes by four weeks^ 
itartlnyMafthll, 



Workshop to inform 
students interactively 

The Psychology of Ordinary 
Prejudice by Anthony Greenwald 
will be from 4 to 6 pm. at the 
Beach Museum o( Art, Parlici 
pants can build multi-cultural 
understanding and learn to use 
the Implicit Association Tests In 
clissroom settings. 



SGA primary vote 
ends tonight 

Polls close at 6 p m, today in the 
SGA primary election. The vote 
will determine which two of the 
four candidate pairs for student 
body piesldent artd vKe president 
win go on to the general election 
Sluctents can vote by log^irtg on to 
igatlectmm. k- itatt.tda. 



UaHu intaktt AreceiilG)luppolaMAmilCMi«iM(tifiiim 

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Page 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Wednesday, Feb 28, 2007 



^aflln JooAi and ^pimA 



1814 ClBflin Rd 
www ctaflmbooks.com 



k 



Fax 



frW) 776-3771 
(7S5) 776-1009 



Puzzles I Eugene Sheffer 



Acnoss 

1 Europe's 
neighbor 
5 Mandible 
8 Brid(^ 

12 Hourglass 
filler 

13 Id 
counler- 
part 

14 Jason's 
sbtp 

1 5 Bread- 
winner 

1 7 Upper 
House 
membfif 

IB More 
logical 

IB Daytime 
soaps, 
e.g. 

21 Dogger- 
el ist 
Ogderi 

24 Altar 
attiima- 
tive 

2SEr> 
grossed 

25 Edge 
30 AAA 

|ob 

33 Hockey's 
Sobby 

34 Aliases 

35 Leading 
lady' 



3« Ullra- 
modemisl 

37 Eastern 
potarvtaie 

38 Actor 
PHI 

39 Repair 
41 Knighted 

woman 
43 Score 

units 
46 Similarly 
50- 

podrlda 
51 Max 

Bialystock. 

eg 

54 Carriage 

55 Help 

56 Leaves 

57 Skin 
opening 

SB Stylish, 
in the 
19603 



SB Mrs 
Shake- 
speare 

DOWN 

1 Snakes 

2 Poet 
Teasdale 

3 Pail of 

thek>op 

4 Arrival 

5 Clampett 

pat^arc^ 

6 Time ol 
your lite? 

7 Irvlorma- 
tton 

B Dieter's 

entree 
B Dan Kir>g. 

tor one 

10 Taj Mahal 
city 

11 Starts to 
fall asleep 



Solution tl 


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21 mini 


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PNCT MWHK PWWQC1 

I N C. J J C. T 1.1 S U 1 C C; I H B G L C X W P 

Ci T H B D X G L M . M W B V O U N L 

S X I) (i V CI L • I I (• S W T ■ .S K D L C 
Vtsterdav's trvplotiuip; THIS KEYBOARD 
INS I RLMIINTCOSIS ONLV A I UOLfSANL* BLCKS. 
SO PhOPLK MtGHI CALL 11 A GRAND PIANO 
Today's Ctyptuquip Clue: M equals Y 



DIVERSIONS 



A waste of time — but you might learn something 

Take a hint from history, watch your picl(ing 



"Do not pick your teeth at 
thetable, except in an emer- 
gency; as however satisfactory a 
practice it may be to yourself, to 
witness it is not at at) pleasant." 
(Henry Wilis, "Etiquette, and 
the Usages of Society," 1866). 

Unfortunately, many fail to 
heed the sound advice of Wills 
and continue to revolt their din- 
ing companions. 

WAY BACK WHEN 

Unsurprisingly, this habit is 
not a phenomenon unique to 
modem man. Anthropologists 
have found grooves on the teeth 
of ancient humans that suggest 
some type of rudimentary tooth- 
pick was in use over 1.8 million 
years ago. 

This primitive toothpick most 
likely evolved into the chewstick 
used in Babylon and ancient 
China. About the size of a pencil 
and fashioned from the twig of 
an aromatic tree, the chewstick 
had two separate functions. 

These humans chewed one 
end of the stick until the fibers 
became loose enough to form 
a rough brush lor rubbing the 
teeth and fashioned the other 
end into a point and used it as a 
toothpick. Some traditional Aus- 
tralian and African tribal people 
still clean their teeth with such 
tools 

CULTURAL EXPECTATIONS 

Public tooth picking is a defi- 
nite no-no in Western society. 
but it is perfectly acceptable in 
China. 

In fact, it is impossible to dine 




at a restaurant without seeing 
ample toothpick usage Commu- 
nal picking between courses is 
not uncommon, as the Chinese 
believe that the flavors of one 
course should not be permitted 
to spoil the nent Many restau- 
rants even provide mint-tipped 
toothpicks as part of their table 
setting. 

No n -Chinese tooth pick- 
ers are forced to select a more 
furtive method to remove food 
fragments from teeth when in 
company without causing of- 
fense. 

The "playing the harmonica" 
technique, for example, involves 
covering the mouth with one 
hand, holding the toothpick 
with the other, and quickly re- 
moving the offending piece of 
gristle or salad leaf. 



llluftratkM by D«nnl« Lm | COUEGMK 



EFFECTIVE TECHNIQUES 

It is polite to exit the room 
to dislodge any food. Efficient 
removal is best done with den- 
tal floss. People have used this 
handy little aid to dental clean- 
ing and removing the buildup 
of bacteria since the early 19th 
century, when Levi Spear Par- 
mly (1790-1859), a New Orleans 
dentist, promoted flossing with 
a piece of silk thread. 

During World War 11, Dr. 
Charles C. Bass advocated regu- 
lar flossing as an important part 
of teeth cleaning. Bass also was 
responsible for developing ny- 
lon dental floss and so may have 
had a vested interest. 

— txcifpt frmn the booh, 'Habitus Dngui' 
tki: Tbt Encyd»|wdii sf Annoying, Rudt, 
and Unplcatant Behav4or,*by Ian WhitcUw 



By Donnie Lee 



WWIS TO 'WlAR.IHAT 

RttAtt^KRS VWcoRtJ 
AMD PtANDTS. 

. .J 

o 




^AlHoit&vfnHlliAT 
1 



SlRftM&E TO 
WAVtAFRoBlfM- 



ULCH.'</ 




The planner 

Campus bulletin board 

■ TiM Japanese Appreciation Asieda- 
tian will fflttt at 7 p.m Wedrtesd*)^ In 
Unions). 

Itemt in the cilenctii can be ptjbilshtd 
up to three tim»- To place an item In tht 
Campus Calffldar, stop by Krdzle 1 16 and 
fill out a farm or e-mail the news editor 
at calie9lan^pub.ksu.tdu by 11 a.m. two 
days before It li to nin. 



The blotter 

Arrests in Riley County 

Reports are taken directly from the Riley 
County Mke Oepartment's daily togs. The 
Collegian does not lift wheel todis oi minor 
traffk vniations because of spate comtralrtti^ 

Monday, Feb. 26 

■ Darrtn Jam« MnsMn, Topelu, at 7:0S 
a.m. for failure to appear. Ho bond was set 

■ Laurie Mae famhani, Ogden. Kan., at 
7:30 a.m. for a worthless check. Bond was 
$500. 

■ latquflyn Lee Casted-Hitssain, 1 7)2 
Ranser ftoad, at 9:30 a.m. for failure to ap- 
pear. Bond was $100. 

■ Branson ThonMS Camera-n, 3000 
luttle Creel( eivd Lot SOS, at 1 2:29 p.m. tot 
probation violation. Bond was $ 1 SOO. 

■ Safiyyih Hasunnah Miitaad, 1366 
Flint Hills Place, at 2: t S p.m. for failure to 
appear. Bond was $500. 

■ SyAka Devon Povy, Junction City, at 
3:51 pm. for a wot th less check. Etond was 
S2S0, 

■ SImm Michael Sleeper, Shawnee, 
Kan., at 10:03 p.m. tor driving on a cancelled 
or suspended Ikense. Bond was $750. 



Corrections and 
clarifications 

Corrections and ctarificitlons rutv in this 
space. If you see something that should be 
corrected, call news editor Ate< Peak at 17851 
S32-6556 or e-mail atkgioiu^^mb.ksu.tdu. 

Kansas State CoUegian 

(USPS 291 OMlThe Kansas State Collegian, a 
Student newspapef at Kansas State University, 
Is published by Student Publications Inc, 
Kedw 103, Manhattan. KS 66506. The CoUe- 
gian is published weekdays during the school 
year and on Wednesdays during the summer. 
Periodical postage is paid at Manhattan, KS 
66502. POSTMASTER: Send address changes 
to Kansas State Collegian, circulation desk, 
MiK 103, Manhattan, KS 66506-7167. 
O Kansas State Collegian, 2007 



tifiitefid^nie nmhw tef^if*' 



The Office of Student Acbvibes and Servces offers 



wncn 



lOUlE 



wwwltZl.coniimE LEGAL SERVICES FOR STUDENTS 



-.«.- T^AI y*v iiWHylton Heights 
>Si'i/V\ ^{^ Manhattan, KS 66502 



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Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2007 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 3 



The Gardens provide 'safer, more affordable' housing 



By SMb Ellis 

KANSAS STArKOlLEGIAN 

Mayor Bruce Snead did Ihe 
honon with a smile and golden 
scisaore at the ribbon-cutting 
ceremony for the Gardens at 
Flint Hills low-income housing 
development Tliesday. 

The Gardens, located at the 
intersection of Kimball and 
Manhattan avenues, is a 48- 
unit low- income housing de- 
velopment funded by tax credit 
funding from the Kansas Hous- 
ing Resources Corporation 

"There is clearly a well-es- 
tablished need for low cost 
range of housing based off 
growth associated with Fort 
ftiley," Snead said. 

He said The Gardens is 
significant because of the long 
waiting lists associated with 
Section 8 and public housing. 

JoAnn Sutton, executive di 
rector of the Manhattan Hous- 
ing Authority, said the differ 
ence between public housing 
and Section 8 is that public 
housing is tenants' rent ba«d 
on income. 



She said Section 8 consists 
of private homes in which ten- 
ants receive vouchers that pay 
30 percent of their rent. 

Tiffany Kellum, «)phomore 
in psychology, said she hopes 
to move into such a low- in- 
come housuig tmiL 

Kellum, who has a 4- month 
old daughter, said many issues 
contribute to the housing prob- 
lem in Manhattan. 

One problem is that it might 
be cheaper to stay off-campus 
and further away, but if stu- 
dents do not have a vehicle, 
it is difficult to get on and off 
campus without public trans- 
portation, she said 

Kellum said it is cheaper 
for her to have a two-bedroom 
apartment, share the room 
with her daughter, and have a 
roommate 

"Rent is high when you 
don't have good credit," she 
said. "Especially when you are 
looking for two people" 

The Gardens use differ- 
ent funding mechanisms other 
than public housing and Sec 
lion 8. 




Sl«vfnDdl|(OlLELIAN 

Chrif Baihy, pmldant of Manhattan ArM Kouslng Psrtntrship, and mayor Bruc* Snud, cha4r for 
Manhattan Housing Authority, cut the ribbon »t the ceremony foi ttw Gardens at Flint Hills low-income 
housing developmem Tuesday. JoAnn Sutton, left, executive director of MHA, Jill Jacoby, executive director of 
the HAHP, and Karen McCulteh, board member of MAHP help hold the ribt»n during the ceremony. 



The Gardens was built 
with $5.6 million in tax credit 
funds. 

The public was free to view 



the housing after a few remarks 
from Snead and Chris Bailey, 
president of the Manhattan 
Area Housing Partnership. 



All apartments have wash- 
ers, dryers, dishwashers, gar- 
bage disposals, and central 
heating and air, Sutton said. 



Relay for Life needs participants for'60s-,70s-themed event 



By Loto Shrimpllii 

KANSAS SIATUOtlEGIAN 

n 

Kayta Horsky said she un- 
derstands the need for Relay 
for Life better than most peo- 
ple. 

The sophomore in agri- 
cultural economics lost one 
grandfather to a brain tumor 
and another to lung cancer and 
cancer o( the esophagus 

Horsky also was bom with 
skin cancer and recently bad to 
have an operation to remove 
more of it, she said. 

"Its not just something 
that happens to grandma and 
grandpa," she said. 



Horsky is a team leader for 
a K-State Relay for Life team, 
and she had enough people 
sign up to be members of her 
team, she had to recruit team 
leaders, she said. 

"I hope that it gets the word 
out, especiaUy for young adults, 
that cancer can affect you and 
not someone else," she said. 

The K-State Relay for Life 
program is the signature fund- 
raiser for the American Cancer 
Society, said Emily Fredrick, 
senior in food science and in- 
dustry and co-chair of the Relay 
for Life planning committee 

The campai^ assists with 
funding for free wigs, cancer 



research, legislation and advo- 
cacy for cancer-based studies, 
as well as other cancer-related 
studies, she said. 

Each person who par- 
ticipates in the Relay For Life 
must raise $100, she said, and 
approxiinatety 40 or 50 teams 
have signed up. 

She said she b hoping for 
about 80 teams. There is a need 
for more teams so K State can 
reach the goal Relay for Life 
set, she said. 

"K-State in particular has a 
goal to raise $75,000," Fredrick 
said. 

Chris Kovarik, junior in 
business management and can- 



cer survivor, said the event is a 
good way lu give back to the 
community 

There are 12 people on 
Kovarik's team Each team can 
have a maximum of 15 mem- 
bers before they have to split up 
into separate teams, he said 

Each member of Kovarik's 
team has raised the required 
$100, he said, but they still are 
talking to members of the busi- 
ness community to raise more 
money 

Those interested in partici- 
pating in the campaign can sign 
up with a paper registration, 
which can be filled out at a 
team captain's meeting, at 6:30 



p.m. March 6 in the Manhattan 
Firehouse, 2000 Denison Ave. 

TTiose who are unable to 
attend the meeting but wish 
to participate also can sign up 
online at wwui.acsevertts.org^ 
ksu/rft, she said. 

On that page, people can 
sign up to participate or pledge 
donations. 

The event will be 6 p.m. to 
6 am April 2021 at Memo- 
rial Stadium. This year's event 
is titled Relay Stock and will be 
ihemed around the 1960s and 
1970s, Horsky said 

"Everything we do there is 
a celebration of life and a cel- 
ebration of hope." she said. 



Conference 
center details 
in the works 

ByWIIowWIlllamton 

MltSASSIAIttOilEOIAN 

The city commi^ion dis- 
cussed details of a new confer 
ence center for Manhattan dur- 
ing their work session Tuesday 
evening at City Hail 

l( buih, the conference cen- 
ter will be part of the south re- 
development project 

lason Hilgers, assistant city 
manager, presented several 
layouts for the building 

The session's purpose was 
not to vote on an action but 
discuss the issue and give city 
staff instructions for future ac 
tion The commissioners ex 
pressed unanimous approval 
of a 30,000 squaa' foot area 
for the building with an esti- 
mated cost of $9 3 million. 

The center should bring in 
approximately $408,000 in 
community revenue from what 
visitors would spenil, $5,324 
in city sales tax. and $5,488 in 
transient guest lax from confer 
ences in its finl year, according 
to city staff 

After 10 years, the center 
should bring in about $13.8 
million in revenue, $ 180,000 in 
city sales tax, and $185,000 in 
transient guest lax, according 
to staff It also should provide 
about 76 new full time jobs 

The commissioners also dis- 
cussed the Pinal Development 
Agreement and the Economic 
Development Agreement for 
the redevelopment project. 

Both are financial agree- 
ments between the city and 
Dial Really, the other major 
player within the redevelop- 
ment protect. 

The FDA is a broad agree- 
ment that encompasses the en- 
tire project The EDA focuses 
on the hotel and conference 
center 



str i ke a 




• !• 





these 
k-staters 



we'fl be in aggievilfe thursday, march 1 . 

9:00 - 1 1 :00 p.m. under varney's marquM 

and Saturday, march 3 at bramlage 

for the Oklahoma state game. 

so bring your friends and strike a pose! 

it's free and the best shots will 
be in the 2007 royal purple yearbook. 



royatpijjple 



to see other students who got their pictures taken go to 
royalpurple.ksu.edu 




^\j;Mm^mrJ2nM: 






Cur TVs wiiils yj- 
s'j'r in our 



Speediest service in Aggieville 
- Best dance floor in Manhattan 



■■ -Solid drinks. We use free-pourers ij 

_i:aciiaa <:ar sxtiois. and take care of our customers 

^ <• Built by students, for students^' 

'I - Owned by a student "^ 



|. '(^') Sia', i5:a ivnan the 

t da.nce floor gets gcir.g '^[jtiii^ 

I 2 iij 3.1 JQ^ JWafiA^ rii /. s 

', premia- r.ight ciuh. 

om@ dfiwn early and play 
with Tank. He' 1 1 b? here' 
SVtry Qisht yntil ilpm^ ^ _^^ 



Wfeflii YAiXU 



V-i^-.J£^-0-i 



il.i: .'Z^.-.ci.i 






,C.*£.V -i i, 



!S2,£i ?',"s:.&:t ki £ 



ii":::S:::i . 






occ 



;.«j^''"r^; 



*• • • *, 



-— .. tfi.\ ^r. .^. 



OPINION 



Page 4 

Abusing animals 
not becoming 
of university 

Respect for animals is some- 
thing upon which all civilized 
people can agree. Inflicting 

umiecessary nmrnniH^n 

suffering and editortal sele<ted 

, |. anddebatwihy 

harm on llV- the editorial boacd 

iiiff thtnffS is ''^^ written after a 
ingmingSlS majority opiniorv is 

damaging to formed This is the 
„ 1 . Colleaiarv's official 

US all and not opinion. 

becoming to 

the image of our university. 

The events that occurred at 
the University of Kansas game, 
Feb. 19, have triggered anger 
and frustration from many ani- 
mal rights groups. When some 
of K-State's supporters heaved 
chickens onto the floor of Bram- 
lage Coliseum, reportedly killing 
one of the birds, fans crossed 
a line between good-natured 
school spirit and cruel displays. 

We realize that some people 
do not respond well to these 
criticisms. But we do not think 
"it's just a chicken," is a valid 
defense of these actions. If Kan- 
sas fans responded in kind by 
chucking cats from the rafters, 
some would honestly be upset. 
We have no reason to feel differ- 
ently about any other animal. 

Any such action is not only 
cruel to the animal, but it is de- 
humanizing to ourselves. There 
is good reason to feel revulsion 
at the kid who used to tear the 
wings off of flies. In these ac- 
tions we feel that something 
living is being tormented unnec- 
essarily. 

As the editorial board, we 
hope our readers will exhibit a 
greater degree of intelligence 
and exhibit a greater sense of 
humanity in the future. 

Though we don't advocate 
throwing fowl of any kind, toss- 
ing pieces of KFC would be less 
trouble than chucking live birds. 
Pluss, as long as you got it off 
the floor within five seconds, 
you still could chow down on 
that bad boy. 

Besides, after another year 
under coach Bob Huggjns, we 
fully expect to turn the Jay- 
hawks into a bunch of dead 
ducks, and that's something of 
which we can all be proud. 



P /^i » N s I s s T * t t 

f Collegian 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



r|(DITMIN[Hllf 
1 1 M»IWNG EDrTW 
M«pHk|NEWStOITD« 
tuqut HMg t CO (OPT (Htl 
J«il H«mtndM I (0'CO<>YCHHI 

ScM«GlrM4|UMW[D(TOII 

Login C. Mtmt [ MiTMEHIM 

Luay D. Mujwy | FLHURfyiNtM 

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Chriitephw HmHrinclMl | PWrOEIMICM 

Knndm FiMgw | l>t(»N141ia)ltD<IM 

Royu Haynti | DNiiNE tCilM 

Court n*y Sltypm | JtD ttHHUitl 

[(WE* *<•«•» I «»E kD UkHAUit 



WRITE TO US 

Lenm can b« submtnwi by e mail to lemnmfiub 
kiu.edu, or In penon toK«Jzie 116. PItaw include 
your full name, year in sdwol and majoi. Letters 
ihouM be limited to 2S0 words All submitted letten 
may be edited tor length and clanty 



CONTACT US 

Kainai State (elleglaij 
Ktdzlt 10] Manhattan, KS«6$01 

Dbpiayadi (785)532-6560 

Classified ads....(78S) 532-6555 

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ntwi^fpub.kiu.nla 




No 

place 

like 

home 



lltuttntlon by Chrittjiu Forsb«rg 

COIUGEAN 



Ones upbringing vital in how the future turns out 




ANNETTE 
LAWLESS 



T^k of gas: $32.50. 

Sunglasses for the road: $1799. 

Mug of b«r wlien 1 arrive: 
$1.25 

Feeling good 
about where I 
grew up: price- 
less. 

For the past 
two weekends, 
[ scampered ofi 
to my not-quite- 
so- metropolitan 

hometown of 

Wellington, Kan. 

And while it lacks the juicy appeal 
ot glamorous big-lime cities, I have 
learned to appreciate the values my 
hometown instilled in me. 

Like many K- State students, I 
grew up in what I'd call "the simple 
life," minus the blonde- and -pink 
frou-frou reality TV antics of Paris 
Hilton and Nicole Richie. 

The black hole of small -tos^ 
traditions sucked me into a me- 
diocre lifestyle - or so I thought. 
Teenagers around me boozed until 
dawn, procreated like fluffy bun- 
nies, and somehow. I stayed a good 
girl among their illegitimate ways 

But 1 wmted out. 

Wellington, the wheat capital 
of the world, had nothing more to 
offer me than a backseat -of- the-car 
pregnancy, followed by a Hee Haw 
marriage, topped off with an our- 
sex'life kicked-the-can divorce. 



This beat out any overly dra- 
matic Lifetime Original Movie I'd 
ever seen, and I believed I could 
do better This pile-of -cow-dung 
lifestyle was not for me. 

Beyond Wellington, I have 
trotted across the country, achiev- 
ing success as a K-State resident 
assistant, Washington, D.C intern, 
student senator and one-time edi- 
tor in chief of the ever-spectacular 
K-State Collegian. 

I've lived a good life. No matter 
how much 1 deny it, however, I 
need to give my small-town up- 
brin^ng some credit Wellington 
molded me into the successful 
woman I've become I was taught 
to work hard for anything I wanted 
in life and that kindness will get 
you far - nobody can deny the 
power of good ol' Kansas hos- 
pitality. I am proud of that The 
past couple weeks 1 have had this 
realization 

As I walked into the cloudy, 
hoedown bars at home, I realized, 
as I have evolved, others around 
me have as well. The g^l who got 
pregnant at 16 is living a reason- 
able life on her own The guys 
who were flopping drunk after the 
football games Anally have sobered 
up - some are even somewhat at- 
tractive These people had matured 
into decent human bemgs. 

And then it hit me. My problem 
with my sinall-town life wasn't in 



the town itself. It was among small 
blemishes within - the few people 
with college educations and those 
who had little motivation to move 
b^ond Wellington While these 
imperfections truly bothered me 
at the time, people grow up and 
change (or the better )ust because 
my peers didn't choose K-State or 
embrace the life I sought, it didn't 
make me any better than them If 
people choose to live in a tight- knit 
community like Wellington, kudos 
to them Besides, for $1 .25 in most 
bars back home, you can get the 
best 16-ounce mug of Coors Light 
in the world. 

Through my 22 years, I have 
come across a lot of strange people 
and even stranger life opportuni 
ties. As 1 embrace even more of 
them, I will hold Wellington close 
to my heart. I realize that I don't 
need a major metro system to 
make me happy or even crazed 
foul-mouthed New Yorkers to greet 
me on the street. I need kind-heart- 
ed people who understand the 
value of hard work - people right 
here in Oz. Dorothy had it right. 
There is no place like home And 
I'm proud to call Wellington mine. 



)MmdMn, pojtikal uwnce. print joumattun 
and publk r«UtMnt, Pieat« tend rammenttte 



Cartoon by Oonnlc Lm jCOUEGiitM 




Wednesday. Feb. 28, 2007 

Black leaders 

offer new 

opportunities 



Barack Obama mi^t be the Rrst 
viable black candidate for president in 
the nation's history, but this is only tbe 
tip of the iceberg. 
It seems there has 
beenSio other time 
in history where 




the black commu- 
nity has had more 
leverage and has 
been in a better 
political position. MIKE 

If anyone thinks KELLY 

Obama is not — 

legitimate, it only 

takc» one look at CNN to see that his 
rock-star status has been cemented ij) 
the political scene. Recent polls have 
him beating both Rudy Giuliani and 
Jon McCain in head-to-head contests 

Even if Obama were to lose this 
time around, he is young enough to 
run again, and again after that, and 
he has a relatively good chance at 
being selected as a ruiming mate if he 
doesn't win the full-bore nominatioa 
But this is just the start. 

As of January, New York congress- 
man Charles Rangel, head of the 
House Ways and Means Committeev- 
became arguably the most power- ■ 
ful conunittee chair in the House. 
Overall, Congress now shows a larger 
black cadre, as the 43 congressional 
seats occupied by blacks include five 
committee chairs and M subcommit- 
tee chairs James Clybum of South 
Carolina is now the third-ranking 
Democrat in the house as majority 
whip. 

Even the Republican Puity has 
tried to gain popularity in the black 
community George Bush has ap- 
pointed two black Secretaries of State, 
including Colin Powell, the first black 
Secretary of State in our nation's his- 
tory In November, the GOP fielded 
three black politicians in major races: 
a vital Senate seat in Maryland and 
governors in Ohio and Pennsylvania. 
That is not to say the Etemocratic 
Party, the political home of the black 
community since the Civil Rights 
Movement, is not courting like never 
before. Bill Ginton was once called 
"The first black president" by Toni 
Morrison, and his wife Hillary - who 
in an ABC NewsAVashington I\)st 
poll holds 60 percent of the black vote 
- is talcing a note from her husband's 
playbook by recruiting many black 
communis leaders into her coalition. 
One such man is South Carolina sena- 
tor Darrell Jackson, whose support 
was courted publicly by Democrats 
Bill Richardson and John Edwards, as 
well as Obama. 

It is important for the black com- 
munity to realize this political clout 
does not come along on a day-to- 
day basis. Now is an opportunity to 
shift not only focus, but government 
resources on issues that are important, 
to the black community 

When choosing issues, it is impor 
tant not to sit on the classic but rela- 
tively secondary issues from the civil 
rights era, but instead to go beyond 
and bring forward challenging issues 
that affect today's Americans 

One suggestion would be to reform 
affirmative action to include school - 
vouchers and charter schools, thus - 
giving individuals more responsibU- 2 
ity It would end the mblabeling of ; 
affirmative action as being targeted Q} 
the black community as an under- Z 
privileged group. Another is to help S 
the rebuilding effort in New Orleans^ 
city whose population before Hurri-- 
cane Katrina was 67 percent black. - 
These are only two suggestions ^ 
of issues that the black community z 
can tackle in the next political year :: 
Whichever issues the people choose^ 
the only way anything will be acconu 
plished is if the community comes - 
to the polls on election day In the - 
2004 election, only W.6 million of tl» 
nation's 34.9 million black voters cast 
ballots A larger voting force will res^t 
in an even larger amount of politicat 
clout in the future. Z 



Mike Kcty h a junior In pce^aw. neaM Mnd om-^ 



Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2007 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Pages 



WORLD NEWS 




WORLD MARKETS FALL 

AFTER CHWESE STOCKS 
: PLUNGE 9 PERCENT 

j SHANGHAI, China - 

! Like an explosion that starts 

an avalanche, a plunge in 

Chinese stocks on T\iesday 

^4tt off a cascade of losses in 

exchanges around the globe, 

culminating in Wall Street's 

most dismal trading day since 

•*e Sept 1 1 terrorist attacks. 

By the end of the trading 

dSiy in New York, about $632 

Billion of market value had 

been lost in the United States 

alone, according tu Standard 

and Poor's. 

Chinese stocks fell al 
most 9 percent, their biggest 
drop in a decade, The Dow 
Jones Industrial Average lost 
416.02, or 3.3 percent, to 
12,216.24 The main indexes 
on European exchanges also 
fell about 3 percent. 

NORTH, SOUTH KOREA 

RESUME TALKS 

AFTER BREAKTHROUGH 

"■ SEOUL. South Korea 
- North and South Korea 
held high-level reconcilia- 
tion talks Ttiesday for the 
first lime since the commu- 



nist nation's nuclear test in 
October, paving the way for 
a resumption of aid to the 
impoverished country. 

The meetings came as 
North Kurea showed strong 
signs of commitment to its 
Feb. 13 pledge at internation- 
al arms talks to shut down its 
main nuclear reactor within 
60 days in exchange for en- 
ergy aid. 

It has already invited the 
chief U.N. nuclear inspector 
to visit to discuss verification 
of a shutdown. 

AMBASSADORS 'SLIGHTLY 
INJURED' IN MORTAR 
ATTACK IN SRI LANKA 

COLOMBO, Sn Lanka 
- Rebels fired on Sri Lankan 
military helicopters carrying 
six foreign envoys TUcsday, 
slightly wounding the U.S. 
and Italian ambassadors and 
sending the group screaming 
and running for cover. 

The Sri Lankan govern- 
ment sard this was a deliberate 
attack, but the rebels said they 
did not know there were dip- 
lomats on board the aircraft. 

Seven Sri Lankan secu 
rity personnel also were hurt. 



but the envoys b-om Canada, 
Prance, Germany and Japan 
escaped without injury. 

The U.S. Embassy issued 
a statement saying Blake was 
"all right" but did not elabo- 
rate. 

Sri Lankan doctors said 
the Italian ambassador was 
treated for a shrapnel injury to 
the head and discharged less 
than two hours later. 

YEMEN'S ISLAMIC PARTY 

LEADER SUSPECTED 

OF SUPPORTING AL-QAIDA 

SAN A. Yemen - Yemen's 
powerful Islamic political 
party replaced a top leader 
Tuesday whom Washington 
suspects of funding terrorism 
and supporting al-Qaida 

Islah voted out Sheik 
Abdulmajid al-Zindani, the 
spiritual leader of the party, 
and replaced him with Mo- 
hammed Ali Ajilan, a Yemeni 
parliament member. 

Last February, President 
Bush asked Yemeni Presi- 
dent Ali Abdullah Saleh to 
arrest al-Zindani because of 
suspected links to terrorism. 

— The Aisoditfd Prtti 



New diet pill requires no prescription 



By Sarah Raimutstn 

l!AI*S«SWtCOLL[(il*N 

Dieters received a new 
tool to help shed extra 
pounds - the first govern- 
ment-approved diet pill that 
can be bought without a pre- 
scription. 

The drug. Alii, was dcvel- 
(jped for people Itt and older, 
it is a reduced- strength ver 
sion of' prescription diet aid 
Orlistat. 

The Food and Drug Ad- 
ntinistration approved the 
;ale of AUi (pronounced AL- 
eye) without a prescription 
gn Feb. 7, but it stressed that 
the drug should be paired 
with a healthy diet and exer- 
cise routine. 

Dr. Charles Can ley, the 
FDA's director of nonpre- 
scription products, said 
the pill alone is unlikely to 
produce the results dieters 
want. 

In trials, Ganley said peo- 
ple taking Orlistat lost 2-3 
pounds more than those us- 
ing only diet and exercise. 

Orlistat trials show it 
blocks the absorption of 
about one-quarter (about 
150-200 calories) of the fat 



Dr, Sanjay Gupta, CNN's chitf medkal corns pondcnt, nimtd the M- 
knvinq items one shoukj remember when considering the u$« of Allt: 

■ Diet and werciHf stil! ire thf most efff rtive methods of weight toss. 

■ GSK and the FDA {tre» that Alii will not worit alone. 

■ There are negative side effects. 

■ A low-fat diet will leduce srfe eff«ts, Iwt a high-fit diet 
will do the opposite. 

■ Alii is not a miracle dnig. DIeten still have to worti for weight knt. 

■ Oo not take All! if you have had in organ transplant. Ther? cmiM be a reac- 
tion with an a nti- reject Ion medicatior. 

■ IF you ire diabetic, have a thyroid condition or are on blood thinners, talk to 
your doctor belor« taking this medication. 

■ Weight lost plateaus after sii months, so etpect only modest weight lou. 



consumed in a meal The fat 
then passes out of the body 
by stools. However, almost 
half of the patients who par- 
ticipated in the trials expe- 
rienced gastrointestinal side 
effects 

Alii is said tu produce 
similar results as full strength 
Orlistat, but results will be 
less significant and take place 
over a longer period of time. 

GlaxoSmithKline will sell 
the drug, which is expected 
to be in stores by summer. 
The final price has not been 
set, but estimates put the cost 
at $ 1 -$2 per day, 

GSK Consumer Health 
care, which wilt market the 
new pill, said it chose the 



name AUi to demonstrate its 
partnership with consumers 
in their weight-loss efforts. 

Ashley Jones, junior in el- 
ementary education, said she 
thinks diet pills are a joke, 
but also said she took Trim- 
spa during her first two years 
at college because of a sug- 
gestion by her dance coach 
to the entire dance squad. 

'If you plan out your meals 
and exercise, then you'll lose 
the weight," she said, "Diet 
pills aren't going to make or 
break you." 

The pharmacy depart- 
ment staff at Walgreens, 325 
Bluemont Ave., said the store 
probably will sell Alii when it 
is released this summer. 



Mall stores close, relocate 
to make space for restaurant 



By Kristin HodgM 

KANSAi STATE CIHlKIAtI 

The Manhattan Town Cen- 
ter will see changes as several 
stores leave or relocate to 
make room for a new restau- 
rant. 

The Aladdin's Castle ar- 
cade and Vista restaurant 
will leave the mall, and Street 
Corner News will relocate 
in order to bring in HuHot 
Mongolian Barbeque restau- 
rant, said Sara Van Allen, the 
mall's marketing manager. 

Van Allen said plans to 
bring in a new restaurant 
have been in the works for 
more than two years, 

The mall's restaurants, in- 
cluding Carlos O'Kelly's and 
Applebee's Bar and Grill. 
made $12 million in sales last 
year, she said 

"It's a profitable busi- 
ness, and that area had been 
deemed as a good location," 
Van Allen said. 

She said the mall had not 
been working to oust any of 
the stores, but the location of 
the other stores was the best 
possible area for a sit-down 
restaurant. 

"They are looking to mir 
ror what they have at Carlos 
(O'Kelly's)," she said. 

Van Allen said HuHot 
Mongolian Barbeque has a 
restaurant in Topeka and 
is looking to expand to the 
Manhattan market. 

The owner of Street Corner 
News could not be reached 
for comment. 

Brad Street er, owner of 
Vista Drive-ln Inc., said after 
10 years, the store in the mall 
is leaving because there is no 
other option. 

"We've basically been 
kicked out," he said 

He said the store's lease 
said if the mall wanted to 
move the location of the 
store, it would give Vista 60 
days notice and move it to a 
mutually agreeable location 
unless no location could be 
agreed upon. 

"There was no location of- 
fered to us that they would 
remodel," he said "They did 
say we could have where Cla- 
rie's (Accessories) used to be, 
but we'd have to remodel it 



A LOT CAN BE SAID 
ABOUT A UTTLE 
BIT OF SPACE 




To give it a try, 

call or stop by 

Collegian advertising 
103 Kedzie 532-6560 




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iMlyn Brown | COILEGIAN 
ttfhlla th« Vlfta locatt»n In tht mftll now Is closed, the original Vista 
Drive -In restaurant still is open. 



ourselves, and it's not in the 
food court." 

Although she was not in 
volved in the negotiation, 
Van Allen said other possibil- 
ities were proposed to Vista 
and the arcade, but the mall 
could not come to an agree- 
ment with them. 

"The lease agreements 
were prepared for such a situ- 
ation to occur and were writ 
ten knowing that this could 
be a possibility down the 
road," she said. 

Streeter said there will 
be some problems with the 
changes because customers 
have said there will not be a 
place for kids to eat or play 
after Vista and the arcade 
leave 

He said local people of the 
mall were supportive, but the 
decision was not up to them, 

"The local people have 
done everything they can to 
work to support it," he said 
"It's the absentee owners 
that don't live here that are 
the ones that do not seem to 
want a local business there" 

Streeter said the company 
still has a location on Tuttle 
Creek Boulevard 

"It will be 43 years this 
summer," he said, "and I own 
the building. So nobody can 
kick me out" 

Streeter said the reason 
the mall owners are adding 
a new restaurant is because 
they want to increase the val- 
ue as they prepare to sell the 
mall. 



"This has been in the workt 
for over two years now," Van 
Allen said. "The sale of the 
mall has just come up last 
fall It has nothing to do with 
raising the value" 

But Van Allen said bring- 
ing in a new restaurant most 
likely will increase the value 

"It's actually not necessar- 
ily a sale," she said, "but more 
of a sale in management." 

The Manhattan Town 
Center Development has 
managed the mall since |une 
2004, Van Allen said, and the 
changes in the management 
are not a sale but a change in 
structure. 

She said five individuals 
form the Manhattan Town 
Center Development. She 
said the changes to the mall 
are due tu the mall's leasing 
representatives and are not 
connected to Manhattan's 
downtown redevelopment 

Van Allen said Vista has 
been a consistent community 
partner for years. 
She said people are going to 
miss it, and the mall wishes 
it could have worked out an 
agreement for a new loca 
tion. 

The introduction of HuHot 
Mongolian Barbeque to Man- 
hattan has just been made 
public, and people have not 
had an opportunity to com- 
ment on its arrival. Van Alien 
said. 

"It's all just new," she said. 
"Vista leaving has kind of 
overshadowed the arrival." 



^^^1 


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Page 6 



SPORTS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



r i 




MELISSA 
HAUG 



Diet plans 

include 

snacks, too 



If you have cut snacks Irom 
your daily eating routine and are 
ignoring those hunger pangs in 
hopes of drop- 
ping a few eirtra 
pounds, boy are 
you going about 
it ail wrong 

The Food 
Guide I^amid 
suggests eating 
Ave to six times 
a day, which 
makes snacking 
an absolute must 

The idea that people are con- 
suming more calories by snacking 
shouldn't ^ve snacks a bad wrap. 
It is the uncontrolled portion sizes 
and unhealthy snack choices that 
are to blame for unplaruied weight 
gain. 

Snacking on small amounts of 
nutritious foods throughout the 
day can help keep your energy 
level high and your mind alert 

The key to healthy snacking is 
choosing a nutrient-dense snack, 
while being aware of the portion 
size. 

Consuming your meals and 
snacks every three to four hours 
throughout the day will help keep 
your body fueled and prevent 
overeating at the next meal, which 
often occurs due to excessive 
hunger sensations that develop by 
skipping meals or snacks. 

The time of day you eat the 
snacks is not the culprit of weight 
gain. Consuming snacks late at 
night is fine if you're hungry, but 
make sure it is low-calorie and 
low-fat. For instance, vegetables 
are a great choice 

It is wise to limit calories to 100 
to 200 per snack. Food labels can 
help you determine the number of 
calories in a serving 

Remember to enjoy foods from 
all five food groups and keep total 
daily calories within the recom- 
mended limits for your body. All 
food groups cEin fit into your daily 
eating plan when you balance 
feeding times and calories within 
smaller portion sizes. 

Here are some healthy snack 
ideas that are 100 calories or less. 
1 cup of powdered hot cocoa 
1/2 cup of fat-free ice cream 
15 chocolate -covered raisins 
6 saitlne crackers and 2 table- 
spoons peanut butter 
8-ounce carton low- fat yogurt 
1/2 cup of applesauce and 1 slice 
of toast 

1/2 cup of frozen orange juice 
~ eat with a spoon as sorbet 
1 small baked potato with 1/2 cup 
of salsa and 2 tablespoons nonfat 
sour cream 

2 -inch slice of angel food cake 
1 hard-boiled egg 
Half an apple cut into slices with 2 
tablespoons peanut butter 

1 cup raw vegetables dipped in 1/2 
cup of fat-free Ranch dressing 

2 tablespoons hummus with 12 
grape tomatoes 

Here are some more snack ideas 
(not necessarily less than 100 
calories): 

Instant hot cereal with raisins 
Whole-grain crackers topped with 
flavored cream cheese 
Popcorn with taco seasoning 
Tbrtifla filled with veggies, salsa 
and low -fat cheese 
Berries mixed with graham crack- 
ers and a splash of skim milk 
1/2 cup of homemade trail mix 
RIa pockets filled with cottage 
cheese and shredded carrots 

If you still are concerned with 
your weight, remember that being 
physically active aids in burning 
excess calories along with main- 
taining the health of your body 



Mdtei lUug h 4 Mfitor in pulilk hHMi mitif- 

tton md dtetttJci «iHf a nulritkin conidttnt 
Md «n Aiii«nun Council on twrow (Mtificd 
pmonal tnlMf at Mm Ittciwtion Coflvin, 
PImm tend cwDflMntt to ip«rts><i'ipvbJau.tdiL 




Quick fix 

Smart diet, cardiovascular exercise 
can help achieve spring break body 



Jumping rope 





Dumbbell lunges 




OK You've waited long enough 

You have all your other plans in 
order. You know where you are go- 
ing You reserved 
a hotel room. You 
have even ac- 
quired a cute little 
gas-friendly car to 
make your trip that 
much more afford- 
able. So what have 
you neglected? TRENT 

You know SCOTT 

exactly what I'm ~~ 

talking about A body worthy of 
wearing the swimming suit you 
have had hanging on your door for 
the last month that will not just 
magically appear You have 17 days 
left to get your rear in gear and 
into shape. 

But who has time, right? You're 
busy going to class and work and 
checking your Facebook every 15 
minutes. Snap out of it. 



Spring break workout >- 

Thera's not mucti timt Itft to gel fow 
body Into shape for spring bnti. Here^ ) 
workout to help gtt ^ou stjrtnt, 

IMt: Go through each exercise once, 

testing only 30 ietonds between lifts Then 
repeat ejch slrengtti -training exert I se again 
before moving on to ^our cool-down 

This should get you in ar»cl out o( Peters 
Rtcreatlort (omple> in about an hour, giving 
you a 9reat resistance and urtHorascular 
worliMl 

Also remember to warm up and coot 
down with enercises like jurriping rope, 
jumping jadu, fogging and stretthlng. 



ExtrciM ^?^^ 


* Rtps 


Push-ups 


IStffK 


(himbbell chest flies 


ISreps 


Push-ups 


1Si»|» 


Dumbbell shoulder pKB 


1Si«|» 


Dumbbell lunge 


12 reps 


Dumbbell squat 


10 rtps 


Dumbbell reverse fU« 


ISreps 


hone badi entenslon 


ISreps 


Wxlominal mjnch 


ZSreps 


Lying leg lifts 


ISreps 


TwstingV-slb 


lOrcpt 



— hwllalt 




Lying leg lifts 



Dumbbell shoulder press 



PhetM by LyndMy Bern | COIIEGIAN 



Harris scores 22, K-State falls to OSU 



By Jaffrty Rakt 

KANSAS SMHtOlUGIAM 



STILLWATER, Okia - It might 
have been senior night, but that did 
not prevent a sophomore from steal- 
ing the show 

Oklahoma State guard Tbnel 
Harris scored 16 of his team-high 
22 points in the second half, leading 
the Cowboys to an 84-70 win over 
K-Statc on Tuesday night in front of 
1 1,266 at Gallagher- Iba Arena. 

After K-State (20-10, 96 Big 13 
Conference) cut the lead to 53-43 
with 11:53 left, Harris went on a 
serious tear to put the game out of 
reach. 

He scored nine-straight points 
in a two-minute stretch, helping the 
Cowboys (20-9. 6-8) to u 62-43 lead. 
their largest of the game 

"We were just hungry." Harris 
said. "We had our backs against the 
wall, and we needed to get back to 
the way we played earlier in the sea 
son We went out there and tried to 
be the best" 

After the Cowboys dominated 
from start to finish, it would be hard 
to argue otherwise. Oklahoma State 
shot 28-of-51 (54 percent) and made 
9-of 17 3 point attempts 

The 84 points were the most K- 
State allowed since giving up 97 
points in a loss to Kansas on Feb. 7 

"We can't give up 84 points and 
win," said coach Bob Muggins 
"We've got to keep it in the 60s and 
the 70s " 

Seniors Mario Boggan and David 
Monds scored 17 and 10, respectively, 
in their final game at Gallagher-Iba 



Boggan, however, didn't get a proper 
sendoff. 

Cowboys coach Sean Sutton 
planned on replacing Boggan with 36 
seconds left, but by then, he already 
had been ejected. Boggan picked up 
a flagrant foul - his fifth of the game 
- after head-butting K-State senior 
Cartier Martin. He left to a standing 
ovation and scattered boos. 

"The game was over, and it was 
just a stupid move by him" junior 
David Hoskins said. 

K-Statc made just 3-oflO shots to 
open the game and fell behind 20-10 
midway through the first halt Then 
Hoskins caught fire, making four- 
straight baskets and pacing an 8-0 
Wildcat run to pull within 20-18 

TVice the Cowboys stretched the 
lead to five points before closing with 
a 12-3 run, capped off by a dunk by 
Monds with one second left to take a 
41-30 advantage into the break. 

"We started the game kind of 
lackadaisical, and guys weren't really 
playing like we needed them to play.' 
said Hoskins, who scored 20 "We 
weren't playing defense like we need 
to play defense. Our last four games, 
our defense has been terrible" 

Things got uglier for K-State after 
halftime. The Cowboys opened up a 
53-37 lead just seven minutes into the 
second half With 14 03 left, Hoskins 
picked up his fourth foul and did not 
return until eight minutes later By 
that time, it was too late, as Harris 
already had done his damage 

■*We only have three guys who can 
score," Huggins said. "We have to 
keep those guys out of foul trouble, 
and wc have to shorten the game" 




Catrlna Rawtort | COUtGIAN 
K-Stait* basketball coach Bob Hugglni 

ytllsduringtheWildcat'slasthomegame 
against Kansas. The Wildcats traveled to 
Stillwater, Okla. to play Oklahoma State 
only to bse 84-70. 

Martin led the Wildcats with a 
team -high 25 points Senior Lance 
Harris and junior Clent Stewart 
each added 10 With just one game 
left on the schedule, Huggins said 
he still likes his team"s chances of 
making the NCAA Tournament. A 
win against Oklahoma on Saturday 
would give K State a first-round bye 
in the Big 12 Tournament. 

No fourth place team in Big 12 
history ever has finished with 20 wins 
overall and 10 in conference and not 
received an NCAA Tournament bid 

"Why should we be the first?" 
Huggins asked 



It's crunch time, baby, and if 
you're going to get that spring | 

break body, you have to start now. 
But don't fret, because I have a 
quick and effective workout that 
will get your body toned and your 
spirit feeling great 

Complete this workout three 
days a week. Make sensible diet 
choices, and do cardiovascular 
exercise whenever possible. That 
means take the stairs instead of 
the elevator, and if you can brave 
the cold, walk to class instead of 
driving You have more than three 
weeks to turn it around and ac- 
complish your goals. I know you 
can do it. 



Trent Scott li • junlar In nutritional tcltncei/ 
prc-mcd and Amcrtcaa Co until «n Exercli* 
(ert)fitd personal trainer at Peters Reaeatlsn 
Complex. Please send tomments toijwrrita 
fpab.kiu.tdu. 




Regan 



Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2007 

1-MINUTE 
DRILL 

Staff Reports 

GLF I Wildcats improve scores 
to finish 5tli at Fresno State 

The K-State women's golf team finished 
In sole possesswn of fifth place at the 
Fresno State Invitational in Fresno, Calif., 
climbing six spots ir> 
the rankings after 
Monday. 

Top -20 finishers 
junior Michelle Regart 
78-74— 152 (-fg) ami 
freshman Abbi Sunner 
77-7S-1S2(-k8)M 
the Wildcats, 

"The girls were 
having some trouble 
adjusting to the green 
speed but made it through and finished 
well,' coach Kristi Knight said. 

The team's fifth-place finish was enough 
to beat No, 12 Denver, Ha. 44 Oregon and No. 
47 New Mexico State. 

"It's easy in this game to get frustrated 
and shoot a really big number," said Knight 
"We didn't do that, and t think that's 
sortie thing to be proud of 

Junior Katy Heffel jumped up the leader 
board after Monday, moving from 6Ut lo 
21 SI, closing the tournament with a round' 
of 72(E). 

"Katy started off badly, but the good news 
is she finished strongi' Knight sjld 

The WIdcats move into their next evtni 
the Texas A&M Mo'morial In Bryan, Teias, 
with momentum, knowing wl^at they need 
to Improve. 

"We're moving in the right direction* 
Knight said. "But we're not there yet' 



The Associated Press 

FBN I Kansas City signs QB 
Huard to Syear contract 

KANSAS CITY, Mo — Quarterttack Damon 
Huaid ac^eed to a three-year CHitract wth the 
Kansas City Chleh. 

Chiefs general manager Carl Peterson 
announced the deal TuKday, but details mn 
not released. A phone message left with Muatd's 
agent Mike Sullivan, was not immediately 
returned 

Hoard, M, was paid $710,000 last season. He 
WDuM have become an uniesthcted free agent 
on Friday. 

Theiotjmeyman proved to be an indis- 
pensable luackup last season when starter 
Trent Green sustained a severe concussion in 
the season -opener against CkKlnnati. After 
spending most of his career as a second- and 
third -stringer, Huard was thrust into the starting 
lineup for eight games and led the Chiefs into 
the playoff hunt. 

He went 5-3 as a starter, completing t48-o(- 
244 passes for 1,878 yards with 1 1 toutjidowns 
and one interception. His 98.0 passer rating wis 
second only to Peyton Manning 

'Dtmon had an excellent year In 2006 and 
(Mtftuted direaly to genlng our team to the 
plijinli^'tamonuM Ini rdtase. 'Damon IS 
an tKcilint VMM pl^v and an outstanding 
petson Wn delighted to have him under 
contrAa" 

Many fens believe coach Herm fdwards 
made a mistake in benching Huard after Green 
was cleared to play. After his return, the two- 
tkne Pro Bowler never looked like the quarter- 
back who made 80-stralghl starts and threw for 
more yanls in the previous ftve seasons than any 
quarterbadi except Manning 

With Green under center, the Oileift Struggled 
down the stretch. A senes of impntMble uptHs 
on the hnai day of the regular season alknved 
Kansas City to slip into the playoffs, where Green 
threw for i07 yanls and two interceptions In a 
23-8 first-mursd loss at Indlanapoiis 

Huard^ signirtg caNs Green^ future as 
a starting quartert»di in Kansas City into 
question He is signed thmugh 2009 and is set 
to earn S7.2 million neirt season, 

Green will be 37 by the start of training 
camp His agent, km Steiner, was not available 
for comment Tuesday, 



BBO I Veterans Committee 
admits no new candidates 

NEWTORK - The Hdll of Fame pitched 
another shutout, 

Ron Santo, Jim Kaat Marvin Miller and al 
the other candkJates were left out Tuesday 
when the Veterans Committee admitted no 
new members for the third- straight election. 

The blank slate coukj tead to changes before 
the nefl vote in 2009 

"We'te being blamed because something 
fusn't happened,' Hall member and vke chair 
Joe Morgan said, "If you're asking me, 'Do we 
lower our standanJs to get more people in^ 
- my answer would be no." 

Santo came the closest lo the required 7S 
percent A nine time Ad-Star, the former Cubs 
third baseman was picked on 5 7 of 82 ballots 
(70 percent). Players needed 62 tor election. 

Kaat, a 283 game winner and strongly 
badted by Hali member Mike Schmidt, drew 52 
votes, Gil Hodges, who hit 370 honne runs, got 
50 votes and three -time Al batting champion 
lonyOlhrahad47. 

Umpire Doug Hanrey received 52 of the 
necessary 61 votes on the balbt for managers, 
umpires and executives. Milier. the union head 
wholedplayet^tofreeagenlnches, showed 
a strong increase in getting S i of the potential 
Blvotes^ 



Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2007 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page? 



Wine event to benefit hospice 



By Krlttln Hodgat 

KANSAS SMIKOUEGIIN 

The eighth-annual Flint 
Hills Festival of Wines will be 
March 2-3 and will include a 
dinner and wine-tasting event 
to benefit the Homecare & 
Hospice Foundation. 

ChrislinB Nolle, director 
of development tor Homec- 
are & Hospice, said the event 
will start with a Winemaker 
Dinner on March 2 at Man- 
hattan Country Club. 

She said the multi-course 
dinner will be paired with dif- 
ferent wines for each course. 
A live auction will follow, 
when customers can bid on a 
variety of items. 

The event will continue 
at 6:30 p m March 3 at the 
Clarion Hotel for the Grand 
Tasting event, where custom- 
ers can try 250 different wines 
and spirits from around the 
world. 

"Ticket purchasers just 
show up, and (hey get their 
wine glass and walk around 
and sample any different 



wine and spirits that they 
want," Nolte said. 

Appetizers also will be 
available from nine restau- 
rants, most of them from the 
Manhattan area, she said 

Nolle said people can 
purchase the $40 tickets by 
calling or stopping by the 
Homecare & Hospice ofRce, 
323 Poyntz Ave. 

She said tickets also can be 
purchased at the door before 
the event, though there arc a 
limited number available. 

Nolte said the Standard 
Beverage Corporation found- 
ed the event and provides all 
the wine and spirits. 

"That way we are able to 
raise funds so that we can 
provide charitable care to the 
community," she said. 

The event is the largest 
fundraiser of the year for the 
foundation, Nolte said. 

Pal Pesci, director of the 
hotel and restaurant manage 
ment program, is on Ihe fes- 
tival committee and said two 
groups of K-State students 
are helping with the benefit. 



One of the groups consists 
of students 21 years of age 
and older who have taken 
the et^t-week wine tasting 
class offered at K-State 

"The students pour the 
wines and talk intelligently 
about the wines and where 
they are from," Pesci said. 

He said the other group 
- one consisting of students 
under 21 years of age - greet 
customers. Members of this 
group also help with the 
check-in and check-out pro- 
cess. 

"It's a nice blend to help 
the community." he said. 

Betsy Barrett, associate 
professor of hotel, restaurant, 
institution management and 
dietetics, instructs the wine- 
tasting class. 

Karrett said the students 
who help with the event and 
have taken her class learn to 
evaluate wines based on their 
color, smell, taste and finish. 

"There's lots of words to 
describe all that," she said, 
"and they can describe it to 
the person tasting the wine." 



Inadequate altitude blamed for plane crash 



THEAUOCIKTtDPRtSS 

OVERLAND PARK, Kan 
- Federal transportation of- 
ficials said a 2005 plane crash 
that killed Ave people in an 
affluent suburban Kansas City 
neighborhood was caused by 
the pilot's failure to maintain 
adequate altitude 

The National lYansporta- 
tion Safety Board said TVies- 
day a Cessna 42 IC Golden 
Eagle 111 that departed from 
fohnson County Executive 
Airport bound for Florida was 
about 600 pounds overweight 
when it took off on fan. 21, 
2003 

The NTSB report does not 
say why the plane was too 
low, but it does mention that 
altitude and low cloud cover 
that morning contributed to 
the crash. 

Witnesses reported see- 
ing the plane climb to about 
2,000 feet after takeoff. 



Then its nose and right wing 
dipped, sending the plane 
hurtling through a street lamp 
and several trees. The wreck- 
age ended up in the yard of 
former Kansas City Royals 
pitcher )ason Grimsley. 

The crash left a 600-yard 
trail of debris, which included 
body parts of the five victims. 

Killed in the crash were 
Annour D Stephenson )r, 
49. of Lee's Summit; his wife, 
Shirley P. Stephenson. 46, of 
Lee's Summit; Lewis Bradley 
Smith, 73. of Kansas City; pi- 
lot James L. Kingston, 60, of 
Stilwell, Kan.; and Kevin W. 
Holzer, 50, also of Stilwell. 

The Stephensons, a hus- 
band -and -wife ministry team, 
were on vacation to Florida 
and hitched a ride on the 
flight. The other passengers 
were on a golfing trip to Flor- 
ida. Kingston was celebrating 
his first day of retirement. 

The crash was the dead- 



liest in Kansas since 1983, 
when five people were killed 
in a crash near Creensburg, 
according to NTSB records. 

Kingston had about 30 
years of flying experience at 
the time of the crash, but re- 
cords from the NTSB show 
that he had been involved in 
two other incidents. 

In 1996 near St. Peters- 
burg, Fla,, an engine on the 
same model Cessna failed, 
sending the plane into the 
ground Kingston and both 
passengers left the scene with 
minor injuries. 

The second crash hap- 
pened in 1999 at the Lee's 
Summit Airport, when the 
right brake locked on a plane, 
causing it to leave the run- 
way. The plane's landing gear 
struck a raised portion of the 
concrete taxiway, damaging 
an engine and propeller. No 
injuries were reported in that 
accident. 



SWITZER I Involvement continues past retirement 



Check u t 





in the CI ass i f i 6 d s 



GREAT BEND HIGH GRADUATES 



WE WANT TO BUY YOU LUNCH! 



MEET WITH COMMUNITY REPRESENTATIVES 

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2ND 

11:00AM - 1:00PM (COME A 80) 

IN THE STATE ROOMS 

(SOUTH END OF FOOD COURT IN STUDENT UNION) 



-^ 



RSVP IS APPRECIATED 620.793.4111 

REGISTER FOR DOOR PRIZES & QIFTS 
BRING A FRIEND! 




12th Annual Graduate Research Forum 

K-State Student Union 
Friday, March 2, 2007 

Oral Presentations 

10:00 am to noon - Undergraduate session 
1 :00 pm to 4:00 pm - Graduate session. 

roster Display 

10:00 am to 4:00 pm 

11:30 am and 1:30 pm- Question and Answer Session 

j^ward Ceremony 

4:30 pm 

Wonderful opportunity to discover research conducted at KSUt 

Drinks are provided! 



continued from P»g« 1 

Before he came to 
K-State, the Wildcats had 
gone through 37 years with- 
out a winning season, and 
Switter said teachers were 
not fond of the football pro- 
gram at the time. 

"We were a little nervous 
about who we let know we 
were athletes in an academ 
ic environment," he said. "It 
was like a double whammy 
for me because 1 was an ath- 
lete, and I am black." 

He said during his sopho- 
more year he was Ihe only 
black athlete on the team, 
and during his junior year 
he was the only black ath- 
lete in the Big 7 Conference, 
and things changed as the 
aeason progressed 

"Things became better 
- change came along with 
the wins" he said. 

During the offseason of 
Switzer's freshman year. Bill 
Meeks, who was the new 
head coach, pulled him into 
an office and confronted 
rumors of Switzer transfer- 
ring, 

Switzer said coach Meeks, 
who had never coached a 
black person before, told 
him if he stayed he would 
not regret it. 

LIFE AFTER COLLEGE 
FOOTSALL 

Meeks kept his promise, 
and before graduation, Swit- 
zer was the first-round pick 
for the NFL draft in 1954. 

Switzer said he was the 
first to make it big from Ni- 
codemus, making everyone 
back home proud. 

He played for the Green 
Bay Packers from 1954 to 
1955. 

However, his NFL career 
ended prematurely because 
he had to fulfill obligations 
he previously made to the 
ROTC. 



In the U.S. Air Force and 
was a first lieutenant engi- 
neer supply officer. Switzer 
also attended pilot school. 

He said it was hard for 
him to leave the NPL. 

"Sometimes, I would sit 
in front of the television and 
couldn't stand to watch a 
football game without tears 
coming down my cheeks," 
he said. 

After the air force, where 
he played on a military foot- 
ball team, he moved to Chi- 
cago to work as a human 
relations coordinator for the 
Chicago Public School sys 
tern. 

COMING BACK TO K-STATE 

In 1968, K-State recruited 
Switzer to serve as a liaison 
between black students and 
the administration, which 
Switzer said was a hard de- 
cision. 

He said during the late 
1960s and 1970s, black stu- 
dents at K-State protested 
and attempted to disrupt 
the administration and gain 
equal rights on campus. 

"Nationally, the term di- 
versity started being devel- 
oped," he said "We were on 
the front lines, developing 
programs for diversity." 

Switzer helped organize 
the Office of Minority Af- 
fairs and assisted the black 
student groups in creating 
change in campus interec 
tions between blacks and 
whites, he said. 

While he still is commit- 
ted to and involved in di- 
versity programming at K- 
State, he retired in 2005 as 
the administrative assistant 
to the athletic director and 
coordinator of minority and 
cultural programs. 

REFLECTION 

lames Butler, Manhattan 
resident, attended K-State 
when black students were 



not allowed to live on cam- 
pus. 

Butler said he has the ut- 
most respect for Switzer. 

"He was an outstanding 
football player in college and 
professionally," Butler said. 
"He is an all-around good 
man and a good friend " 

Butler said black people 
have to work twice as hard 
as whites to gain the same 
amount of recognition. 

"You have to outdo your 
competitor, be consistent, 
persistent and keep a good 
reputation," he said. 

In his opinion, he said 
that was how Switzer 
mastered his role at K State 

"Veryl broke many racial 
barriers at K-State," he said 

Switzer said black 
athletes have been to break 
racial lines pushing behind 
the scenes. 

Switzer said he is proud 
of the steps black athletes 
have taken, especially at 
K-State with the arrival of 
coach Ron Prince. 

"They used to say blacks 
couldn't be quarterbacks 
and definitely couldn't 
coach," he said 

Prince said he admires the 
professionalism trailblazers 
like Switzer had in their role 
of opening doors fur blacks 
when many institulions 
were not allowing racial 
integration. 

He said football is diverse 
not only in race but also in 
the type of talent sought. 

"The game of football 
allowed children of 
sharecroppers from the 
deep South, coal miners 
from West Virginia, people 
from the Great Plains and 
immigrants from all over to 
experience an education," 
he said 

"That kind of diversity 
is what the American 
experience is all about," 
Prince said. 



2007-2008 SGA Elections 



Primary Election 



http://s()aelections.ksu.edu 

Tuesday 

February 27 

8:00 a.m. 

until 

Wednesday 

February 28 

6:00 p.m. 



Select the two president/vice president 

tickets that will be placed on the 

general election ballot. 



m ^jwu. 'Mt 1 -mfmh W 




KSU STUDENT GaVERWINB A»SOCIATION ELECTIONS 
WWW.K-ITATr.EDil'CLCCTIONB 



<,<n i ri w ^ i ^rtw«t^» 



Pages 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2007 




1 




.,„! 








^ 




[ 


Mil 










H 



PHotoi by Lyndsty Born | (OUEGIAN 

Above; Ettt Stadium Is the location of the Purple Ma^ue Theater. Uppar right: Cardwall Hall it the location of an observatory with an \ 8-inch Cassegratnlarr telescope. Lower right: In the waft wing of tht Wafnorial 
Stadium It an S-by-1 7 foot, warthemed mural. Far right: A larga glats-blown chsndtllar hang* in the main window of Usrianna Klstler Beach Museum of Art. The sculpture is by Dale Chlhuly. 

Little-known places on campus offer history, culture 



By EUsaPodhaJsky 

Z KANSUSWECOILEGIW 

w Rumorsofghosts.agrimand 

.^ghastly mural, custom -blown 

glass and a retired stargazer. 

These are just some of the areas 

; and traditions of which many 

students arc not aware 

All over campus, students 
come across buildings and art- 
work they have not seen but sel- 
dom bother to find out more 

CARDWEILHALL 

Numerous students have 
visited Cardwell Hall for a gen- 
.eral-education math class, but 
many do not know why it has 
a large white dome atop the 
■building. 

— The dome is an old obser- 
^tory where six or seven tele- 
^opes, including an 18-inch 
;yassegrainian telescope, once 
^ere housed. 

r Cardwell Hall was erected 
Zin 1963, and the observatory 
-was constructed within it. 
Bharat Ratra, physics pro- 



fessor, said the observatory was 
closed about four or five years 
ago by the fire marshal because 
the room only has one exit, Ra- 
tra said the department does 
not have the resources to build 
another exit. 

The Department of Hiys- 
ics has been restoring the tele- 
scopes m hopes of relocating 
the observatory. 

He said, mechanically, the 
observatory was designed 
poorly. It was placed on the 
same "slab" as freight elevators, 
causing the high-powered tele- 
scopes to bounce around and 
unable to hold a target. 

Also, he said there is a prob- 
lem with light pollution on cam- 
pus due to parking lots, making 
it almost impossible to see dim 
stars at night. 

"We're kind of hoping we can 
get a nicer place on the Konza 
l*rairie to move to. There's less 
light pollution bom Manhattan 
there, and you would be able to 
see much fainter objects in the 
sky," he said. 



MEMORIAL STADIUM 

Memorial Stadium has two 
relatively unknown places that 
display a more macabre, or 
ghastly, history. 

Memorial Stadium was 
built in 1925 to honor students 
who fought and gave their lives 
during World War I It was K- 
State's football stadium until 
1967 

During the summer of 1985, 
an 8-by- 17-foot warthemed 
mural was painted in the 
breezcway of the west wing of 
the stadium. 

The mural Is a fresco - a 
painting on a moist, plaster 
surface with colors ground up 
in water or limewater mixture 
- and depicts various aspects of 
the war, 

A group of K-Statc students 
and high school teachers com- 
pleted the mural in two weeks 

It includes the names of K- 
Stale students who died in the 
war as well as poppies, large gas 
masks with mosaic eyes, a float- 
ing skull on the battle fields. 



a rat gnawing on an injured 
horses leg and a dead soldier in 
a trench or mine. 

But perhaps the most eerie 
pari of the mural is the Grim 
Reaper, clad in a black robe and 
carrying a scythe. He is painted 
in the same archway of the sta- 
dium where people must stand 
in to view the mural, giving the 
feeling it is hovering right next 
to the person. 

PURPLE MASQUE 
THEATRE 

The Purple Masque Theatre 
on the other side of Memorial 
Stadium offers a possibly haunt- 
ing experience for students. 

The theater is located inside 
Gate 11 on the north end of East 
Stadium where its legendary 
ghost, Nick, allegedly resides. 

In 1946, athletic dormitory 
facilities were constructed in 
East and West stadiums for 266 
students The Masque opened 
in 1964 in what had been the 
cafeteria for the donns. 

The legend begins when 



a football player for K-Stale 
named Nick was injured during 
a game in the 19S0s and carried 
off field to rest in the cafeteria. 

Nick's parents, on their way 
to see the game, died tragically 
in a car accident. Nick died 
^m the intuitive shock he felt 
when his parents passed. The 
legend claims he haunts the 
Masque, walking up and down 
its halls, banging on pipes and 
playing tricks on students, still 
searching for his parents. 

The 100-seat theater, despite 
its supposed paranormal activi- 
ty, hosts full-length productions 
and one-act plays. 

BEACH MUSEUM OF ART 

The Beach Museum of Art 
currently is under construction 
but still offers several services 

The addition is a gaUery 
wing, set to open in October. 

Martha Scott, business and 
marketing manager for the mu- 
seum, said there are two galler- 
ies open and also then: is per- 
manent artwork. 



One of these permanent 
pieces is Chandelier, a large 
blown -glass sculpture by Dale 
Chihuly. The bright orange 
piece hangs from the ceiling 
in the main window and was 
made specifically for the space. 

"It's my understanding that 
(Chihuly) was here in the spring 
when they were doing the pfei 
rie bums," she said. "The orange 
flames were his inspiration for 
the color" 

Scott said Chandelier is 
something many students tend 
to overtook because it is on per- 
manent display 

There are several areas on 
campus for students to learn 
more about K-State tradition 
They can ask for a tour of the 
Cardwell observatory or head 
to the Purple Masque for a 
good show and maybe even a 
good scare. 

All non-atthbuted historical 
information courtesy of Univer- 
sity Archives attd Special Col- 
lections. 



GETANTIBiOTICS 

FROM YOUR DOCTOR. 
NOT YOUR PORK. 



We're serving naturally raised pork that doesn't require a prescription. 

The pork we serve in Manhattan is free of antibiotics and 

added growth hormones, fed a vegetarian diet and raised humanely. 

We think meat raised this way, naturally, tastes better. 

Serving naturally raised pork is another step in our 

ongoing Food With Integrity journey - bringing you 

the best ingredients from the best sources. 




MEXICAN GRILL 
- SERVING NATURALLY RAISED PORK IN MANHATTAN - 



AGGIEVILLE 



Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2007 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 9 



FICTION 



Earbud Evil 1 A lunchtime retrospective 



By Logan C. Adanu 

KANS»SUr[ COLLEGIAN 



EditoTi note: This is the third segment of "Earbud Evil" a 
fictional story the Collegian is publishing daily for the next three 
weeks. This story foUowi Alex, a fictional K-State student, as he 
deals with a campus-wide crisis that threatens the university 

Thou^ the names of real people will accompany made-up 
characters, all events are fictional. This is intended for entertain- 
ment and is not factually based 

Katie spotted me while 1 was making long, hungry strides to- 
ward the food court in the Union and beckoned me to come her 
way. 1 signaled with my index finger that I'd be there in a minute 
I had waited long enough to get my lunch. 

1 made my way to her table a moment later with fresh Panda 
Express and some iced lea to see what she wanted. 

lb my dismay, Katie's friend Rhett joined her while 1 acquired 
sustenance. I usually try to turn friends' friends into mutual 
friends, but i made an exception for Rhett. 

His parenU had given him that name, we believed, with hope 
he would have the same debonair, refined characteristics as the 
actor from "Gone with the Wind " It hadn't worked, 

"How are you?" Katie asked, giddy from a sugar high "I 
haven't heard from you in weeks " 



I sat down at her right-hand side to keep my distance from 
Rhett, who was sitting acmss the table, looking straight through 
me and listening to some music 

"I'm alive and kicking, so I suppose 1 can't complain," I told 
her, forcing a small smile. "At least life isn't boring." 

Katie took another hit off of whatever corn-syrupy elixir was 
in her cup, looked me straight in the ey« and sighed a you- 
screwed-up sort of sigh I tried to maintain my innocence and 
waited for her next move Rhett gninled. 

"Alex, is there something you wanted to tell me?" she asked, 
purring like a tiger does before dismembering a bal^ gazelle. 

I paused and tilted my head. 

"No," I answered, picked up my tray and exited table right 
Thithfully, I had no idea what she was getting at and didnt really 
care to find out. 

[ picked a table in the Union's courtyard and sat down to dig 
into my chow mein and a few newspapers. The noodles were a 
little cold, but that's to be expected from a mid-aftemoon order. 

My day's course started filtering through my stress addled 
mind as 1 strained to make sense of it. Three people had acted 
rather bizarre to me while clinging to their music no matter how 
socially or academically inappropriate 

Bill, my usually- friendly lab partner, had tried to choke me 
Even more, it was the first time 1 ever saw him without his 
prized K-State baseball cap, the one he autographed by Bill Sny- 



der, Ron Prince and Bob Muggins. He called it the triple-threa 
hat, but he had left it behind today. 

The guy who had nearly put me on the ground by Wud Hi 
had not make the slightest effort to miss me, but he had not 
seemed to tjy to get nie, either I figured he had problems with 
his sight and maybe his attitude, as well. 

Rhett was surprisingly quiet. Normally, I couldn't get him 
to stop blabbing abtjut problems with his job or his circle of 
equally unpleasant friends. All 1 had to put up with today was 
his 1 .000-yard star* and the occasional "ugh." 

Tb be honest, I liked this new version of him. 

I finished my meal and read my paper for a while. Tlte 
courtyard where I was sitting is under an opening in the first 
second floors, so people on those floors can look over a raili: 
and see who is below After a few minutes of rest, I felt someoi 
was watching me. 

1 looked up Katie was giarittg at me from the first floor. She* 
turned and sulked away, like she was going for the stairs that ^ 
would bring her to my floor I didn't feel like being grilled, so 1 
quickly trashed the newspapers and garbage from my meal as 1 
made my escape through the hallway with the row of ATMs. 

My eyes squinted In the bright sunlight as my thoughts shifted 
to the basketball game that night against KU, I walked north to 
do some studying at Hale. 

1 didn't make it very far 



QUESTIONS I Women seek to break stereotypes with honest answere P 



continued from Page 1 

Black people are not all 
like that, Tajuba said 

"We are different. We 
are individuals, and there 
is something that makes it 
unique for all of us." she said. 

Rayonna Thomas, junior 
in apparel marketing, said the 
session was an opportunity for 
students to come out of their 
shells and ask the women 
questions they have been 
thinking about and wanted to 
have answered. 

"Even though you may not 



talk to us, we do have a lot to 
offer to society," she said 

The only way to break a 
stereotype is to get to know 
people, said LaToya Farris. 
assistant director of Career 
and Employment Services. 

"It's important for people 
to come because we can 
only talk about being black 
women," Farris said. "1 think 
it's important to listen to 
someone else's story so that 
you can figure out for yourself 
and not go By with what 
society and stereotypes have 
told vou to think " 




Coming and talking to 
someone can help with 
breaking those stereotypes 
and keeping from just going 
with the flow, Farris said. 

"You can actually think 
for yourself once you have 
actually heard something and 
you can actually make your 
own judgment," Farris said 

Stereotypes are disturbing, 
said Gini Conkle, junior in 
open option. 

"My best friend is half 
black, and it realty bothers 
me when people are really 
racist," she said. "Some of my 



tQETCKSO 



best friends that I have met in 
college are really racist, and I 
tell them not to talk about it 
around me." 

Conkle said she wished 
there had been a wider variety 
of races at the event so more 
people could hear what the 
women had to say. 

"I think that there will 
be more people at the Ask a 
Black Man one tomonow," 
she said 

The Ask A Black Man 
panel will take place from 12 
to 1 p.m. today in the Union 
Courtyard. 



lo li«ihp lOtro huin huoma 
and ihcjck* vith>mT 



lltl> ICili 



Everything 25^75% off 



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Sun 12-6 

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St«v«n Oo(t I COLLEGIAN 

Rayonna Thomas, Junior in apparel and ttxtllas, answars 

audience memtiers' questions during a panel diicuision with four 
other blacl< women Tuesday afternoon in the K-State Student Union 

Courtyard, 



Kansas State University 
McCain Performance 

Series 2006-2007 
www.k-state.edu/mccain 



LEAHY 




New Traditions in Celtic Music! 
Sponsored by Holiday Inn at the Cannpus 

SUNi:iAY MAIlC [ 1 4 (<?' 7:30PM 



National 
Philharmonic 

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Satutcl<>,j.Mo,ckl0at7;30l'M 



fliftMll'MUl 
Di.Gorl) MoiU'iitiiil 



4 jyi^mnmj 




Kansas State University 

McCain Audrtorium 

2006-2007 

Performance Series 

Tickets: 

Call the McCain Box Office 785-532-6428 

and charge your tickets to 

VISA, Mastercard, AMEX or Discovar 

weekdays 11am • 5pm 

For more information or to buy online go to 

www.k'State.edu/mccain 

Leefiy 's pnstnted In pan by 

the Kansas Arts Commission, a statv agancy, 

tha National Endowment lor thv Arts, a Fadaral aoency, 

iha K-Stata Fina Arts faa and tha Friandi of McCaM. 



Page 10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2007 



ROYAL PURPLE 



we ve got tlie stories 
vou've ^ot to read. 



Get your Royal Purple yearbook 
in Kedzie 103. 




B Achsek out fka ^^ • | 

NlSSnu Guide 

ick oft 

labfe_ in 



in bock or the 

Campus Phone Book; 

AvQildble in K«d»a 1J03 i 
Moo. - Fri, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m} 



APARTMENT HUNTING 101 

Most Locations Near KSU 

You can WALK to: 



^1^ 



Class • Library 
Aggieville * Banks 
ttestaurants • Coffee Shops 
Watering Holes (NO DUIs) 



Clean 1-2-3-4 8R Apartments, 
Duplexes, and Houses 

DONT SKIP CLASS BECAUSE YOU 
CAMT FIND A PARKING SPACE! 

^J^Ioore ifroperfy iMJanagemenf 

SINCE 1974 

view our propcrtv s'ti'tirsq the 15lh 28th 
www. moo re p ro pe rty rn a na ge m e nt . com 

Lease signing begins Feb. 26th 

785-537-0205 



li 




Uving Under The Patriot Act: 

Eduraling A Society 

Pm«iitpd byt Paul A. Ibbrtson 

AVAILABLE ON THE SHELF 

AT Hastings bookstore! 

AVAILABLI rOROROERAT BORDERS. 

&ARNES & Nobles, and Amazon com. 
Learn thi Facts about the 

MOST rOWf Rf UL TOOL IN THI 
U.S. War ON TERROR 





Why 

YOU 

should get a 

Campus 
Phone Book 



' Onlj' Phone Book wth Students' C«ll Phone Numbers 

' Coupons with the Greatest Deals 

' A Menu Guide with local restaurants' menus 



Purchase Your§ in Kedzie 103 



Presented by: 

The College of 
Business Administration 
and Students in Free 
Enterprise 




L 



What's your 3IG idea? 

take it on! 



EntrepreneurshipWeek A 

Feb.24-March 3,2007 

www.cba.k-state.edu 



Entrepreneurship Week USA Events 
The schedule of events is as follows, 
both events are set for Thursday, 
March 1, 2007: 

Entrepreneur's Product Fair 9:30 a.nn.- 
12:30 p.m. Courtyard Area K-State 
Student Union 

Come meet successful entrepreneurs and 
discuss their product and company ideas. 

Panel Discussion 1-2:15 p.m. Little 
Theatre, K-State Student Union 
Take part in a discussion with experts 
from a variety of areas dealing with 
innovation and new technology 
commercialization! Panel members will 
discuss topics relevant to 
entrepreneurship today., followed by an 
audience question and answer session. 
Click here for a list of panel discussion 
participants. 

Both events are free and open to K- 
State students and faculty and the 
general public. 



CLASSIFIEDS 



Classifieds continue 
on the next jpag^ 



more 
readers 



www.kstateconegian.com 



Ads sdnduled to \x pfinted m U CoHegun c«i 
be p(Jb(l;^ed online for an additional Ms. 



Place your ciassiy ad online. 
Get more bang for your buck. 




ManhatlHi CITY Ordl- 
nanc* 481* atiura* av- 
•ry part on aquil opponu- 
n ny In h ou ling wlltraul di*. 
tinctlan on accounl ot 
rica. tai, tamtllal itatua. 
mltMary ttatut. dliabllHy. 
rallfllon, »ga, cotor. na- 
Honal origin or ancaatry 
Vlolallon* (ttouU to r» 
poflad to lh« Dtrador at 
Human Haaourca* at CHy 
Hall, (78S)M7-ZMD. 



MANHATTAN CITY Ordl- 
nane* Ml 4 naura* av- 
■TY P«rtQn fqiM) opportu- 
ntry ki houalngiwMiouldla- 
Unctlon on accounl of 
rac», MI. ramHIal tUtua, 
military alatui. dlMblHty. 
rallglon, aga, color, na- 
tional origin or incaatry. 
Violallont ahould ba ra- 
portad lo (tw Olrador ot 
Human Raaourcaa al City 
Hall. <TSS)5«7Z440. 



1117 VATTIER N«* M 
sieciilc TiiKO^edrooms, 
fippliancas lurrvtahed, no 
pels Clos« to campus 
785 539-1975 or 

785-31 3-8M2 

1219 KEARNEY. One- 
bedtoom Juna. yaar 
laiM. Wtlai/ 1r>»ti pak). 
Nexl lo c^mixis. on siraot 
parking No pals t350 
765 539-5136 

1219 KEARNEY TWO- 
e£0R0OM3. Augual, 

year laasa Water/ iras^ 
paid Neitt lo campui, o8 
vlrael parking No pals 
J660 785-539-5136 

ALLIANCE PROFCRTY 
MANAGEMENT. Onebed- 

rtjorrr Jur^e, July, August. 
785-539-4357 Www.retll- 

aptawm 

AVAILABLE JUNE 1. ooa- 
badroom. large, clean. 
Only pay slectncrty Small 
p«lB aAowod Batcony. 
great bcation 1670/ 
monlh 785-341.7289 

CLEAN TWO-BEDROOM 
m lour plai witt> wastiar' 
drysr in unit Water and 
Irasti paid No pats, S500' 
nwnlh 785-539-2368 

ONE, VNO. lour, ftva-bad- 
room opanmanta/ t»usas 
(Of June and August 
leaaaa 785-564.0897 




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Pfl 


111 


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K Y 


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UUfilMIl m.53^6555 1 



ONE, TWO, threa. and 
lour-bodroom aparlments. 
Closo to campuK and ag- 
gieville. Parliing anr} laun- 
dry 785-539-5BO0 

ONE, TWO, three, tour, 
nve. BIX tMdroom apart- 
ment txiuses neitt lo cam- 
pus. Wastier/ dryer, cen- 
trel air No Pels. 
7«S-537-705O. 

ONE- TMREE-BED- 

ROOMS, near carr^pus. 
August lease, pets ok 
785-776-2051 

ONE BEDROOM APART- 
WENTS In qulal slx-pl«x 
at I8lt Plan. Aveitatila 
June 1 St Unhimlsfied. 
central air, parttlng, water 
and tmb paid. No pets 
S375 par rTMntti. Call KSU 
Foundalton at 

785-53Z-7569 or 

785-532-7541 

ONE -BEDROOM TO live- 
tiedrooms Apartments, 
duplexes and tKimes 
Moil doM 10 campus 
Some larther away. June 
or August leaiaa. Check 
out pur wflt>alta www . 
emerBldpropertymanag- 
mani com or call Emerald 
Property Menagemant 
785-587-9000 lor more in 
tomtalton 

PARK PLACE Apart- 
manti Ona- Bedrooms. 
Summer/ la# teasing. Pats 
welcome. One- haH mile 
from KSU at Seth CNid 
and Ctmin 785-539-2951 

PARK PLACE Apart- 
manla. Two- bedrooms 
Pats welcome. Summer' 
Fan leasing. One- tiaH 
rrMe hem KSU el Selh 
CNk) and Oafln. 
78S-539-29S1 



THREE AND lour-bed- 
room apartments avail- 
able in August CloBe to 
campus. Water and trash 
paid. Coffi operated laun- 
dry 785-537.7810. 
785-537-2256 

TWO, THREE and tour- 
bedrcKHTis, close to cam- 
pus, central Bir. dish^ 
waitier. laundry lacilniaa 
No pets, available f ebru- 
aryl. 785-539-0868 

TWO. BEDROOM SPE- 
CIAL at Park Place Apaft- 
ments $495 rem plus Iree 
cable througti July 07 
785-5392951 

TWO- BEDROOM . 
CLOSE to campus Per- 
sonal wastwr/ dryer $645- 
S87S/ montti 

785-341 4496 

TW0>BEDROOM, many 
si2es aryJ prx:es. June or 
August 785-341 0686. 

VERY NICE ttiree-bed- 
room, two tiatti aparAneni. 
Three tilocks to Aggievile 
822 Fremont AHordabla 
utilities, August 1 . 
785313-1807 

WHY RENT WHEN VOil 
CAN BUY? Condos lor 
sale Two and ttyee-beo- 
room starting at 5112.650 
collegiatevlllacom 
785-5372096. 

WILDCAT VILLAGE Avail- 
atile June or August lour 
bedroom. two t>ath. 
washer/ dryer, storm 
room, $1400 Cable paid. 
7BS-776-Z425 or 

785-566-3760 www.vil- 
laga-renlats.cam. 



Spacious 
Duplexes 

ir> fnind 

Etcti dupttri iMlurii Willi -m 
tk)Hli. BlUcchtn 
ipplidncai. wtidir/drytrr. aft 
irrett pi Thing, ptmn« ind 
cibl4 coonaclhoni in mirv 
rQi>m, iicuritv444lttiiitt. triih 
ind ttvim cifft 

Sicurtry dtpas^t \\ Ithi aime 
SI unv ^nu41T^^ iinl The 
Ifllbipvthid tUQMihAuguil t 
lur om ytiT. 

4 B*droQmt. 2 fl«th« 
IJMSq R 
ONLVtt150/mo. 

SdfTV, Ho ^ni 
Quivt Nftiyhborhood, 

Cortwnlant and Clo»a 
to Campui 



S^ftcww* 



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Fvw Spaces Remirr^ tor 
*UppirClaf&itiBn 



*(j'ejiiijtjfr-v<« iiw .*.rfT,-.]r".K| 

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*tt irt it^ 1» J WJi mi trii LiMwf 

WESTCHESTER PARlt 
776-1118 



. 1420 

Itechiwood Terrace 

New Apartment 
Lq. 2 & 3 Bedrooms 
l''BatlK 
Wflsher/Orypr 
Energy Ciricleiii 

On a Wooded 

Secluded 2 Acre Lsl 

with Creeh 



S740 a, $88S 
3414024 




Cgjtti; ^ ftt> '**""ir"^ 

2000 Coll«g« HUt 

•1114 FrMRont'- 

•Sit 



wmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 



Classifieds continue 
from the previous page 



CLASSIFIEDS 



To place an advertisement call 



Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2007 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 1 1 



' ' -^ 1 1 1 1 I I : II II I J I I a i 

LET'S RENT 





CONOOt Ftm SALE, 

Two and rhrt-boikoom 
ctaftlng it StiS.SSO. coU*- 
giit«vlll>,com 
7»5- 537 2096. 

FABIX-OUS UPDATED 
fouf-tMdrxHHn, one and 
ooa-halt bath, brlcK ranch 
hom« toulM mu ot 
KSU. $149,900 CH 
785-539-6751 



lOK APARTMENTS spa 

cloiis two-bedtootn cparl 
maw m modefn comp)e« 
twiD blocKs asBt of cam- 
pus at 1010 Kaanwy 
QuM «tTMI. quality stu- 
danl Hvlng Urge L- 
s^ape<) kircnen, dia^- 
washer. Afr conditioning. 
WHind prooted. wall Insu- 
lted, low uUUties, laundry 
•Dom. no pels Juna 1- 
«ay lease. $580. Call 
}e5-S39-2538. 

421S rOYKTZ, twfo-bed- 
}QO(Tia, acniss troM dty 
^ark with on-street parti- 
)>g. Cerrlral air, washers 
dryar. Mautral eolon wtHi 



trash paid June lease No 

pets 7a&-3i3-<eie 

1«2» FAIflVIEW. Quiel 
one-bfldrciom ($400) arut 
Studio (S37S) near KSU 
Laundry. Vyater. trasti 
paM. No pets, no smok- 
ing 1 JUNE. 
53(K>42H21 

350 N leth Two bkxiki 
to K-Stala and AggievWe 
liK>4>Bdrocim apBtlrrtents 
Clean. quIel, prtvata parti- 
Ing. No smoking, no pets 
tSM June uvj August 
leases 765 539-5508 or 
785 564^857 

JUNE LEASE two-t>ed- 
room apanment Walk to 
campus. Eicellent condi- 
ttorW locallcn. hop J/wmt.- 
iLt.n.LKil&te .com 

7^-^10-2614 

LARGE TW0-8ED- 

ROOM, avaiiatjte Jurw. 
Balcony, firaplace ar>d 
dishwastwr Vary eloea to 
CWn|MM. Call 

786-317-3780 Laavs 



PRE-LEASINQ JUNE and 
August Sorrie units birand 
now. close to KSU, 
waatiet/ dryer if)ckided. 
Call tor detais 

785-776-2102 youngwllk- 
sOyahoa.oom. wwwwilk- 
saptsoom 

THREE-BEDROOM WITH 
porcti ar>d sunroom, S11 
Bluamont, August 1 lease, 
laiHKliy included, no pets. 
$945 plus utilities. 
TB$-313-M82, leave mes- 
sage 

TWO AND ttiree-tMd^ 
room Close to cempus 
Central air. disliwastier. 
coin operated laundry ta- 
cilily AvaitatitB Jurve or 
August. tilo pels 

785-537-1746 or 

785-539-1646. 




1111 WHARTON Manor 
Road, lour -bedroom lower 
level duptex wtttn neutral 
colors, two t>athB, washerf 
dryer furnished 817 Val- 
uer, ihree-tiedroom lower 
lavol duplex Witt) new car- 
pel, neutral cokirs arnl 
washer/ dryer tiooK-ups. 
^ory reasonable rent with 
great space In bottv du- 
pleies June lease. No 
pets Call 7 SS-3 13 -48 12 

NICE DUPLEX S06 Vet- 

tier Four-bedroom two 
batb Includes alt appli- 
ances, washer/ dryer. No 
pets Available August 1 . 
S108D/ month 

785-293-S197. 



Need to sublease? 



Advertise before it' 6 
U>o late! 




1001 KEARNEY Four- 
Bedroorn, also have 
Three, Five, Siit and 
Seven-Bedroom houses 
AH JUNE 1 rentals. Pets 
OK 785-317-7713 



1022 HUM VOLT, S24 

Freemont, 1118 Ratona , 
lour-twdroom. two t>Bth. 
washer/ dryer. dlsh^ 
washer, oanfral «tr. 
tllM - 11300. Doug, 
7aS-3t3-S573. 
IMS PIERRE, llTo 
Pomeioy S1 100 - $1200 
Four-l>edroom, two b«lh. 
wssher/ dryer, dish- 
washer, central air. Au- 
gual )•■«« 785-313-5573, 
Doug. 

1S$S CAMPUS Road 
Four-bedroom, two baths 
Central air, wast)er/ diyer 
lurnishied Neutral colors 
with nice, new baths 
Large bedrooma tor an al- 
tordable pnce. June 
lease No pets 
785-313-4812 

BEAUTIFUL REMOO- 
ELEDtiomac 1612, 1614 
Pierre, tour- ^ivB^Jedroom, 
two bath, trash carpet/ 
paint New kitchen, bath, 
modem applianCflS. Ckisa 
to campus Move rn June. 
August 78S-304-OJ87 

BRITTNAy niOQE town 

tiouw tour/ tive-l}edroom. 
two and one-halt battts, in- 
cludes appliances, 
washer/ dryer. No pets 
Avaitabto August 1 
785-293-5197 

FIVE-BEDROOM 

MOUSE Walii lo campus 
Two i(itchens. firapl a eo. 
central air. neutral colors, 
washer/ dryer tumisttad. 
garage. lawn malnte- 
narv:e June leasa. No 
pats Call 715-313-4812 

FIVE -BEDROOM TWO 

bath. June lease, washier, 
dryer, dishwashei, central 
flir. $140000/ month 
785-313-5573 Doug 

NEW LISTING, avatlstHe 
June 1. Four to tive-beO- 
room iiouse located east 
ot Aggieville at 824 
Laraml* Two bath, 
washer/ dryer. dish- 
washer, central air. Lease 
deposit plus utilHies 
785-539-3872 



NEXT TX> ewnpua, one 
through ilK-tMdraom 

house*, and apartments. 
Wutml dryer, central air. 
AvallBbIa now or fall. No 
pels TB8-E37-T0MI. 

ONE AND thrwMtWd- 




washan' dryer Near cam- 
pus and ctty partt August 
1 7 85-532 -9504. 

ONE-BEDROOM FULL 
bath washer/ dryer, no 
smokers SI 5 Vattlar, 
8340 plus utilities Augual 
laaae. Call Monday - Fri- 
day 7Sfi 776 4805 

THREE-BEDROOM TWO 

t>ath. wastier/ dryer, no 
smotiers 515 Wtter, 
$828 plus utilities Augint 
laaa* Celt MorMlay - Fri- 
day. 7a5-776-4«0S 

THREE-BEDROOM TWO 

bam. 1205- 1207 

Pom«roy. June lease, 
washer, dryer, dish- 
washer, central air, 
$1050 00/ month 

785-313-5573 Doug 

THREE-BEDROOM, 

TWO bsth duplen, two car 
garage, washer/ dryer, 
very well rr^lntainad. 
Available Jurw 1, $830/ 
monltv. 821 Misskm 
785-776-9280 

TWO AND three -bed- 
rooms TtMO Mocks to cam- 
pua June arid August 
leases. No pets, taundry 
tiook-ups, central air. 
$295/ tMdroom. 

785-336-1124. 

TWO-BEDROOM bese 

mem apartment. Washer/ 
dryer No pets. $600/ 
month ChMp utlHtlae. 
Available AuguM i 1211 
Thurslon. 785-868-3471 
caiaiier 

7p.m 

TWO-BEDROOMS. one 
balh. attacl>ed garage. 

Central air, appliances, 
washer/ dryer. No pels 
August. $730. 

785-537-8420. 
785-341-5346 



CHRISTIAN FEMALE 

seeks two temala gradatu- 
dents ataning lal 2007. 
August to May lease New 
thrv«-t»droom, two t>ath 
house with washer/ dryer 
$350 pkia one-thM utltl- 
ttes Can 847-975-1464 

FEMALE HOUSEMATE 
tto drinking/ smoking 
$295/ montti. Qne-mlrd 
uHliUes, washer/ dryer, Au- 
gust leaa*. vH- 
ca313Cksu.sdu. 
785-537-1464 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted through July. Two- 
bedroom duplex. Wastwr/ 
dryer, and storage Rent 
and uMltiet negotiable 
Cal Amanda at, 
913-216-4838. 

MALE. WALK to dass. all 
tumlahed, lower level, 
washer dryer wtttwut me- 
ter No smoWng, dnnking, 
pets, 785-539-1554. 

ROOMMATE NEEDED 
until May 31. Rent $275/ 
month plus one-tourth ulUt- 
ties Washer/ dryer, dish- 
wastwr In house Cat 
785-537-3737 

ROOMMATES NEEDED 
tor two bedrooms In five- 
bedroom tiousa. Next lal. 
Ckue to campus Outdoor 



620-382-7241. 





Pre-lease 
Today for 

Spring! 

Only A few 
homes remain 

Amenities: 
•VWasher/Oryers or 

hookups available 
•On-Site Mariagement 
•Garages Anailable 
•Private Fitneii Centci 
•Storm Center 
•Peaceful Garden 

Setting 
•Enormous Clotets 



c;eobc;etown 
776-8080 



LOOKING FOR three 
roommatas m (our-bed- 
room duplex. 500 
Laramie. $285 per room 
Washer/ Dryer 

765-410-2916 or 

765-447-0852 

THREE BEDROOM 
UNIT tocaled at 8/ 802 
North 5th. No pete, $975/ 
month, available Juna I. 
785-564-0372 



WALK TO dass. One, 
two, three, lour-twdroom 
No smolting, no drinKlng. 
nopals. 785-539 1554 





■^REE FEMALE room- 
matas needed lor (all 
2007 Ctose lo campus, 
washer/ dryer, no pels. 
$260 plus utilities Call 

.Jenna 785-4 79-1430 




. FOUR-BEDROOM three 
baths (August] $1280. 

'. ntot. Wmtml Dryer 
hookups, offslreet park- 
ing, great tocalion. rto 
pets/ smoking. 
785-5328256 

FOUR-BEDROOM, TWrO 
btth duplex lor rent plus 
. study room, One-haJf 
blocii from KSU Every- 
^tlng new. complalely re- 
WOdtiad including new 
hardwood floors, new 
ftoor coverings. new 
Jdlchen cabinets and et»pll- 
. ances (even washer and 
dryerj Trash and lawn 
i car* Included, No pets 
> 11400/ mortVi. Juna pos- 
;MMlon. Cal Reglns el 
• Enidrald Propeny Man- 
786-587-9000. 




1015 PIERRE Very nice, 
tour-badioom Fenced in 
back yard. Spacious 
rooms Wastier/ dryer 
July or August lease Alt 
pels considered Chris. 
785-770-2161 

1310 N. Iltti, Two4ied 
room. June lease No 
pets, cloee Id campus 
785-539-1975 or 

785-313-8292 

1417 NICHOLS, four-bed 
rooms, lam#y room 1909 
Kenmar, three -bedrooms 
Both two bathrooms, 
washer/ dryer, garage 
game room, lencad yard/ 
patio 785-539-1177 

303 FREMONT, Wree-tied- 
foom. one bath, no pets. 
Available June 1 
785-539-1975 or 

785-313-8292 

AVAILABLE JUNE 1 
Three -tiedrtXHTV houia lo- 
cated at 1501 Many 
Road Two blodia wast of 
campus, central air, 
washer/ dryer, fenced 
yard, 785-539-3672 

CLEAN, QUIET basement 
apartment. Two-bedroom, 
two bath, lull kitchen, pa- 
llo $385 par month per 
person All utilities In- 
cluded emilyltSiisu edu 

FIVE-BEDROOM, TWO 
bath house tor rent 931 
Vattlar June lease 
Washer/ dryer, window alr- 
conditioning Fenced back- 
yatd, pet* alkiwed. Off- 
street parking. $1500/ 
month 785-539-4949 

FIVE- BED ROOM June. 
July, August Alkanee 
Properly Managamant. 
785-539-4367. www.ranf- 
apm com 



FOR RENT Newer four- 
bedroom duplex. Good lo- 
cation with dishwasher, 
washer and dryer No 
pals $1160 

785-537-7597 

FOUR TO five-bedrooms, 
two t>ath. washer/ dryer, 
central air. dishwasher. 
Ctose to campus 
785-532:9564 

FOUHBEDROOM AND 
siX'tjedroom houses 

Ctose to campus and Ag- 
gieville. Psrtong and laun- 
dry 785-539-5800 

FOUR-BEDROOM 
HOUSE Ck^e to cam- 
pus. Large tiackyard. Cen- 
tral air/ heat No smoking 
or pets Wired tor fwt tub. 
AugusI lease $1100/ 
month 1520 Hartford 
Road 795 /59-3520 

FOUR-BEDROOM, ONE 
bath house lor rent 900 
Vattier June lease 
lAfssfwr/ dryer, central air- 
conditioning. Fenced back- 
yard, pets allowed $1200/ 
month Party shack and 
garage inckxled 

785-539-4949. 
FOUR-BEDROOM, TWO 
and one-half tiath, study. 
August 1 S975 per 
month Knight Real Es- 
tale Can 795-539-5394 

FOUR-BEDROOM. TWO 
bath, nice Sized bed- 
rooms Central air. two 
car garage, washer/ dryer. 
f4o pet«:' smoking $1400/ 
inonih, available In Au- 
gust. 1420 Visla Lane, 
two artd one half titocks 
from campus 



3f8-8«>Q.1700. 



Check the 
Classifieds! 




FOUR. BEDROOM. 
JUNE. July. August Al- 
liance Property Manage- 
ment 785 539-4357 wvm.- 
ttnl-actruaini 

ONE HOUSE 2031 
Tecumsah Four-bed- 

rtxHh. two balh. June 1 
lease TWo, hatf-duplaxet, 
with four-badroom. two 
balh. washer/ dryer In- 
cluded. $1200/ month, no 
pets 785-539-2357 or 
785-341-8578. 

ONE TO llve-bedroom 
aparlmants and houses 
Ckiss to OBItlpUS. 

785-539-1975 W 

785-313-8282. 

ONE-SEDnOOM TD flve- 
bedroome. ApwVnenls, 
duplexes ind homes. 
Moal ctose to campus 
Some Itrthar away June 
or Augual taaias Checii 
out our weballa www - 
emaraidpropertymanag- 
ment com or call Emerald 
Property Management 
785'587-900O tor more In- 
tormabon. 

SEVEN TO algfil-badreiom 
(two kltehan) Juna. Juty. 
August Altlanca Propeny 
Managemenl 
785-539-4357. www.rant- 
apm.cpm 



SIX BEDROOM (TWO 
kNchan). Juna, Juty, Au- 
gust AXIance Properly 
Management 
785-539-4357. www.rent- 
apm.com 

SPACIOUS FOUR-BED- 
flOOM, tv«) bath. 
Washer/ dryer, nice 
kitchen Near City Park 
Available May 1 $1100/ 
rrwnth plus ubirties 
785-313-1886 

THREE, FOUR. FIVE, SIX 
PLUS BEDROOMS Look 
Ing tor that perfect home 
10 rent? Great selection 
and prlcea. Capstone 
Management 

785-341 -oeee. 

THREE- FIVE-BEO- 

nOOMS. near campus 
August lease, pets ok 
785-776-2051 

THREE-BEDROOM 
HOUSE at 1721 Ander- 
son Available June 1 . Un- 
fumistied. ofl'Srest park- 
ing. $750 per month Call 
KSU Foundation at 
785-532 -7 569 or 

785-532-7541 

THREE-BEDROOM, ONE 
full balh. $610, 917 Bkie- 
mont. year lea«e, June 
2007 - May 2008 Ctose 
to campus Pels allowed 
Mrs Kim. 913-681-9959 

THREE-BEDROOM. 
TWO bslh, one mile west 
of campus Washer and 
dr^er provkled. $1000 per 
month 785-313-7473 

THREE-BEDROOM. 
JUNE. Jut^, August Al- 
llanca Property Manage- 
ment 785-539-4357, www.- 

rent aBiD.com 

TWO-BEDROOMS. 
JUNE, July, Augual. Al- 
llane* Prop«rty Manag*- 
flieol 785-539-4357 wvm^ 

tim-iGiiLCQai 



HOUSE SEVEN minutes 
from campus. $200.00 par 
nrionlh Call 

913-961-5929. 

SUBLEASEH NEEDED 
lor Spring 2007 semester 
$315/ month. Four-bed- 
room apartment. First 
month's rant pakl, cheap 
utilities. 913-495-2558 or 
913-406-1034, 

SUMMER SUBLEASE 
One-t>edroom. $390 pkjs 
ulHities. Ctose lo Ag- 
gleviHe, pets attowed. 
913-960-5161. 

THREE-BEDROOM 
APARTMENT two bkxiiB 
to campus, ctose to Ag- 
gieville. Rent $300/ per- 
son Call 785-22 1-6680 

TWO-BEDflOOM APART- 
MENT, walk to campus, 
$620/ month Includes utili- 
ties 785-275-1409 leave 
message 



AS NEEDED JUVENILE 
INTAKE AND ASSESS- 
MEf*T OFFICER. RItoy 

Couont GofflmuDl&f Cot- 
taOksa la accepting appll- 
otHon* tor *ever«l as 
naedad, on-cal luvanll* in- 
take and aaseaamant offl- 
cen Minimum require- 
ments Include a high 
school diptoma. Hourly 
rata lor c«il-oui duty It 
$10. Oivcall tetmburta- 
rr>ent Is $30/ day. On-caU 
offtoers work a rotating on- 
cell schedule, with the 
usual schedule being one 
weak of on-caH duty every 
8- 10 weeks Law anloica- 
menl expertenca or direct 
expertenca working with 
juveniles la preferred 
Valk) driver's llcenee and 
ablltty to work AexCila 
hours is mandatory. Appll- 
cabons can be obtained 
from HUey County Clertt's 
OHkM, 110 Courtftouse 
Ptaza, Manhattan, KS 
68602, or visll our web- 
sHe, iMlllMLlliuCQun&hL- 
gu. RKeiy County l« an 
•C^Bl opportunity em- 
ptoyer. 

BANK TELLER Immadi- 
•t* opening lor tuK-Ume 
front line arkf or drIve-up 
leHar. Lookktg for outgo- 
ing, anergeUc, profes- 
skinal, servk» oriented 
person. Prior hank or 
cash hwHflng experience 
is a pHjs tHit rHit required. 
Forty ttour work week. 
Great hours Great bene- 
Itts. Apply at Kansas Slate 
Bank. fOlO Westtoop, 
Manhattan. Equal Oppor- 
lunlty Empkxyar. 



BARTENDING! $300 a 
day potential No eipeh- 
ence necessary. Training 
provxied CaH 

1-800-965-6520 ext. 144. 

CAMP TAKAJO Naples. 
Matna, noted lor pic- 
turesque takefront toca- 
tkxi. exceptkmal lacilfttat 
Mid- June through mk)- 
August. Counsekir poal- 
lions in tennis, baseball, 
baskaQ»ll, soccer, 

lacrosse, goU, flag fool- 
ball, roller hockey, swim- 
ming. saHIng, water skUng, 
gymnastics, dance, horse- 
back riding, archery, 
weight tracing, newspa- 
per, pttotograpny, video, 
woodworking, oeramk^ 
pottery, crafts, fine arts. 
sHvar jewelry. ooppef 
enamel, nature study, ra- 
dk)/ alectmncs, ttiesler. 
costomer, piano aocompa- 
ntat. rTHjsk: ^strnmental- 
isl, tMCiipacking. rock 
clintilng. canoeing/ kayak- 
ing, ropes course, secre- 
tadal, nanny Call Taka|o 
at 866-356-2267. Submit 
application online at 
takajo com 





EOC 



Burger King is »rk ing high -enerjty people (o join our 
rcttsurini family II you are itekingi piosition that 
can offtr a growth Itddrr leading to minagtment and 
a solid benefit package, please irome complttt an 
application. Wta re likingapplications tor all shifts. 
Wr offrr: 

• Compatlttift tiartlngutaga 

• Paid t^catlon program/or all tUffm*mb*n 

• 1/2 price on/off duty mealt 
■ free untjvmu 

• Frequent perfiirmanct/Mlary evatuatiom 
a FltxibU ichettuttttg 

a Tiiltlon retmburMemenI program 

a Retirement program 

a Saving! bond purrhaM program 



I iti LArfr^^v O ^0^i Wh^iW 



COMPLETE OUTDOORS 
Inc. seeking all posltkms 
In landscape. Irrigation, 
and malntenanoa. 

785-776-1930 

DISC JOCKEY Are you a 
people person? Do you 
want to earn extra money 
while actually hiaving fun? 
w ww.kftnaitdH cjocKiy, -- 
coin^. 

EASTER HELP needed at 
Manhattan Town tenter 
kiCBlton Manager pay 
$455/ week. Easier Bunny 
$6.50/ hour CaH Becky 
1-800-422-6967 



THE COLLEGIAN cannot 
verify ifte financial polen- 
tlel of advert Isementa In 
the Employment/Career 
olaatlftottlon Reader* 
•re advlaed lo approecti 
any such bualneee oppor- 
tunity wHh rM- 
aonaMe eau- 
Hon. Ttie Collegian urge* 
our readers to contact lts# 
Better Bualneas Bureau, 
SOI SE Jeftareon, 
Topaka, KS 86607-1190. 
(7881232- 04S4. 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSIS- 
TANT- Nehworks Plus, the 
leader In providing busi- 
ness computer servk^a, 
has a lull-time posttton 
avaUabla In Manhattan, 
KS TtHs challenging posl- 
tton requires the ability lo 
handle muibpla tasks and 
pnonlies while maintain- 
ing a poaltive and ener- 
getic atutuda $12/ hour. 
luU-lkna only, opportunl- 
tl«) lor advancement E- 
mall i«suma In Micmsofi 
Word or text format to: |ob- 
sOnetwoikapkis.com 



HARVEST HELP wanted. 
Late May thmugh August. 
Pays well 785-587-1956, 
evenings. 



HAY COMPANY In search 
of summer workers, larm 
aipenertce needed Eicel- 
lenl wages 765 564 2590 

HORTICULTURAL SER- 
VICES, Inc Is seeking reli- 
able, motivated IndMdu- 
ala tor full-ttme or part- 
ttme seesonal postttons In 
our retail garden oenier 
Above averega wagas 
oorrimenauraM with expe- 
rience UKJ abWOes. Apply 
In person at 11524 Land- 
scape Lane, SI. George, 
Kansas 785-494-2418 or 
7e5-77ft<l397. 

HOWE LANDSCAPE Inc. 
has several poatVons 
Bvallable lor our landacap- 
ing. Irrigatkin and mowkig/ 
rrwntenance crews. Tf^li 
IS lor lull tuns and pan 
lima help, with flexible 
achiedulee for students, 
prelerat>ly lour hour 
btocks of bme AppUcsnti 
must be 18 years or age 
and have a valid dnvera li- 
cense Starting wage is 
U.OOl hour Apply three 
ways, in person Monday 
through Friday at 12780 
Madison Rd In Riley: can 
7BS-48S-2857 to obtain 
an applicatton: or a -mall 
us al tKmllDll9iiAnUl.' 
Ottt. 

JOIN THE K-Slafe Online 
team at the Offtoe of Medi- 
ated Educalton. and con- 
trUxiie to a vanety of Im- 
portant K- State web sites 
and Bpphcatk>ns. Candi- 
dates must be motr^ated, 
capable ol teaming new 
skils qutokly. seH-dl- 
ractad, able to work al 
least 15 hours a weak, 
and willing to devote at 
laaat a year to the posi- 
tion. Working with web 
lechnotogles in an olfic* 
ttvat values Its students 
provkJes a lun yet chal- 
lersging work environment. 
Starting wagas tiegin at 
$7 00 For more Informa- 
tion email ua at omeof- 
tlceQksu.edu. 

KSU STUDENT help 
needed lor working in 
greenhouse and tree pack- 
ing Four hour block Ume 
required 6:00».m. to 12:- 
00pm or 1:00pm lo 5- 
00pm Monday Hirough 
Friday $6 00/ hour. Apply 
at Kansas Forest Servtoe, 
2610 Claftm Hd 

LOOKING FOR part-bme 
help in Scraptxiok store. 
Monday- Wednesday- Fri- 
day daylkne. Experier^ce 
prefened. Please call Sab- 
rlna 785-41 0-31 77 

LUNCHROOM/ PLAV- 
OROUND SUPERVI- 

SORS Immedlato open- 
ings- Manhattan- Ogden 
Elementary Schools. 

$6.50 per hour one and a 
half- two hours per day. 
11:00 am- lOO pm Ap- 
plication avariable at www.- 
usd3e3.org/Olstrict/Hu- 
manRasouices/ or apply 
at Human Resources De- 
partment, 2031 Poynti Av- 
enue Applications ac- 
cepted until positions are 
lined. Apply to fi^anharian- 
Ogdsn USD 363. 2031 
Poynti Avenue. Manhat- 
tan. KS 66502 
785-587-2000. Equal' Op- 
portunity Empkiyer. 

MANHATTAN COUNTRY 
Club Is seeking pad -time 
bag room/ cart staff Will 
work with your class 
schedule. Must t>e avail- 
atile rrwsl weekends. Call 
7e5-S39422t •« tor 
Jecque or JeN. 

MATH TEACHER USD 
378 IS accepting appltca- 
lions tor a high school 
math teat^ier Contact 
Becky Pultz al 

bputtz@usd378.cc»n or 
785-485-4000 



PLAY SPORT SI Have 
lunl Save moneyi Matna 
lun tovlng 
to leach AM 
land, adiMMure and water 
sports Great aumnwil 
Can 868-844-8080, ^ipty: 
campcedaicom 

PROGRAMMER- CIVK:- 
PLUS is the natkma lead- 
ing piovkjar ol City, 
County, and 8«nocit web- 
sites. Fui-ttnt potWon In 
Manhattan. MIcrOMfl ASP 
and SQL expederxK re- 
quired. $15 504 hour pkjs 
time end a h4ill tor over- 
Uma. Benefits Include 
HeaKh. I3emal. Pato ftoll- 
dayt, Pakl Vacalton. and 
401K malching Email re- 
surrw in Microsoft Word or 
tsxt format to Jotis^civic- 
pkjscom 

PROJECT MANAGER- 
Civk;Ptus has an opening 
In our Manhattan head- 
quarters offica for a full- 
llrrw project manager. 
This cftallanging posllton 
entails managing muMpta 
webislte redesign projeels 
from start to finish. Post- 
tk>n requires attention to 
detaH. the ability to man- 
age multiple tasks, prtori- 
ties and deadlines and s 
cTieertui attitude Training 
Is provided Benefits in- 
duiie fieatth, dental, pakl 
holkfays, pakl vacabon 
and 401 (k) n%auMng 
Email resunM m text or 
Word lormat to 

Jobs ® civk^lus . com . 

PROJECT MANAGER 
CivKPIus has an opening 
In our Manhattan head- 
quarters olfice for a full- 
time Project Manager 
This Cfwllanglng posHkin 
enlaHs managing rrHittiple 
websiM redesign projects 
Irom Btan lo linlsh Posl- 
iKin requires attention to 
detail the abiUty lo man- 
age multiple task, pnon- 
lies and deadlines and a 
cfieeiful atttlude Training 
Is pmvided. Benefits In- 
clude Health. Denial, Paid 
Holxlays. Pakl Vacaikxi 
and 401 (k) matcfxr)g 
Email resume in text ol 
Word formal to jobs 9- 
dvk^uscom 

SEVERAL POSITKJNS 
available lor liekl lechni- 
Cians working with greater 
prakie chk:kens In 
Kansas. These positions 
are kleal tor anyone intor 
ested In graduate school 
lor witollle blotogy Will be 
fitteen to thirty hours per 
week startir^ immedi- 
ately. Pay IS $6 25 per 
hour. All interested per- 
sons please send resume 
and cover letter via e-mail 
to gregola^flksuedu or 
call785-532-«413. 



ruBtsc 



Network 

Support 

Technician 



Sallna Public Schools Is seeking a 
professional to Join the Information 
Ttchnology team in delivering 
services to 1 700-1- certified and 
classified employees. 3-5 Years 
experience with Windows operating 
systems, A+ and Network 
Certifications. Ability to llfl and 
deliver 40 pounds. Salary 
commensurate with qualifications 
and experience. Applications 
accepted until filled For more 
information or to apply, go to 
www.usd305.com . EOE 



NOW HIRING! 

Management 



Art you cenlidini, poiilivt. fast pacad, 
andtnrhuslaitkl 

Sur^ Kin| i ol MantMiun and K^ncciod Cky 
in ^liinj fo, rrvalt oftvnttd ip^ivtduih to ffevr 



Ho mtmivt MpvfHAct? fie Preklam. 

W* w<ll tntn tt^ n^l LikdMdUtl ff«m tht |I«iinj ll»r up. 

Wf oHv « (OfnfttttM UAVT 4ii4 ^rMIt p«cklia< btlt<i on CWftr 

And hl^ HpvfWncff. IManwlllii%(«^tlwiTV«letettMu 




. aetjc sm/ii^ pUm with out e^ 

. tt iiiat^iatiliiii ■H u ll piliii 

. a Omy Wot\ Wmk 

. tHomthty a 4j<rtifef BwtM l^vtram 



MM H ^ JH^ toHlfthMtiatu 



SO LONG SakWh how hir- 
ing waitreaee*. Apply In 
person. 1130 Moro. 

SUMMER INTERNSHIP 
Help me run my business 
Open to an ma(on Five 
pOBltlona avaUabla, aver- 
age earns $800/ week. 
Call 785-31 7-045S. 

TAPS LANDSCAPING is 
tooktng for dependable 
salt mollvatad tuH and pan 
Ume help CompeHttve 
wages, fiexable flours 
Must be 18 wttti DL Apply 
by a-mall lapsMgaMmOs- 
bcgtobalnet or call 
785-539-8675. 9am-4pm 

THE CITY of Westmore- 
land IS taking appticattons 
tor a pool manager for the 
2007 season. LHe guard 
arki WIS training pre 
tarred but not raquirad 
Salary based on experi 
ence and » negotiable 
Job dascriptton and appH 
cstton available at C% 
Hill, PO. Box 7, West- 
rtwreland. KS 66549. 
786-457-3361 Deadme 
lor applications is March 
1 6th Equal Opponunity 
Empkyyer 

VILLAGE INN, )oln our 
team' Now hinng tult-llme 
and pari-time servers and 
hosts and part-time cooks 
at our Manhattan, KS 
restaurant CompeWlva 
wages, tnendiy environ- 
ment, great tienefns and 
oppodunitles lor advance- 
nneni Apply in person at 
the Manfianan VHIaga Inn. 
204 Tutfle Creek Blvd 
Equal Opportonity Em- 
ptoyer. 

WILDCATSNEEDJOBS - 
COM PAID survey tekers 
needed in Manhattan. 
100% Iree to join Click on 
surveys 

WINTER/ SPRING Posi- 
llons Available Earn up to 
$150 per day Experience 
not required Undercover 
shoppers needed to judge 
retail and dining esiabljsh- 
menti. Call 800-722-4791 




SET OF 08 road witraels 
and fire* lor Toyota truck 
MKkay Tfiompson Qbssh; 
Lock Wheels- 15x10. 
Tires are Good Vmt 
Wrangler MT/R 31x10.50 
$500 OBO 316-304-5852 




NOW HIRING - TWO LOCATIONS 



ABOVE AVERAGE COMPENSATION 

• Discounted Meals 

• Flexible Schedule 

• Crew Incentive Programs 

• Medical Insurance 

• Retirement Plan 



Vl'Pi.^ 101 >A\ • WOKK rODAV 



421 N. .IrdSutct 

3006 Anderson Ave. 

EOE/Dnig Free Workplace 



r^ duo'* PtftTwuMH ill uBiii^ti^ >BHipiwmmp»>Bi*rp*i«f 
>-T.i,^^irHirrMiiniBHPi>^itmgl>»»Oiw«fcO»iwi:^n 

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Pregnancy 
Testing Center 

539-3338 



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Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2007 



ARTS I ENTERTAINMENT | SEX | FOOD | YOUR LIFE 

THE EDGE 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 12 



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StiVMi Doll I COllEGIAK 

StKy NadHu, a mod«l fgr th« Dov* 'Real Beauty" campaign, shows a photo of an ad displayed at a bus stop in Chicago during a presentation Tuesday night in the LiRle 
Ttieatre in the K State Student Union. Dove featured Nadeau in the ad during its 'Real Worrien, Real Curves" campaign. 

Former Dove model speaks about positive body image, self confidence 



ByEHcwiLaui 

Six women, in their underwear on 
a billboard, braved ciiticism two years 
ago to break stereotypes and promote 
a healthy body image. 

People need to discuss positive 
self-body image, said Stacy Nadeau, 
senior at DePaul University and a 
model for the Dove "Real Beauty" 
campaign. 

Nadeau, an industrial organiza- 
tional psychology major, shared her 
experiences in the "Real Women, 
Real Curves" presentation Tuesday 
night in the Little Itieatre in the K- 
State Student Union presented by 
Sensible Nutrition And body image 
Choices The presentation was a part 
of the Eating Disorders Awareness 
Week which SNAC is sponsoring. 

The campaign began when a psy- 
chologist from Harvard performed a 
global study on what woman thought 
was beautiful. She said only 2 percent 



of women felt comfortable calling 
themselves beautiful She said Dove 
decided that statistic had to change. 

"The Dove mission is to make 
more women feel beautiful everyday 
by widening the stereotypical theme 
of beauty and by inspiring women to 
take great care of themselves," she 
said. 

Nadeau said she has days when 
she is not happy with certain parts of 
her body, but she is thankful fur what 
she has. 

"I've absolutely had those days, but 
I was lucky enough to grow up with a 
very healthy image that was instilled 
by my parents," she said. 

She said she does not think it is an 
issue that is in everyday conversation, 
though people need to talk about it. 
Nadeau said a negative body image 
is something that is taught by society, 
mainly by mainstream mitlia. 

She said the public reaction of the 
campaign was 95 percent positive. But 
there was some negative feedback, in- 



cluding a newspaper columnist who 
made negative comments about her 
body. However, he received more 
than 2,000 responses from women in 
the area and later issued an apology. 

it took our picture for these 
women to say, "No, she's fine, she 
looks like me,'" she said. 

Nadeau said being a good role 
model and opening conversation can 
help to change negative body images. 

"It showing me in my underwear is 
going to help one woman say, 'These 
thighs are OK - at least tlicy work,'" 
she said. "I would have done it a mil 
lion times over" 

She said the real change starts 
with the inner self 

"Start with yourself because you 
can't really help other people if you 
don't truly believe it first," she said 
"Start to change your own mind, and 
even if you have to fake it for one day, 
try it and see what happens" 

Stephanie Davis, co-coordina- 
tor of the Eating Disorders Aware- 



ness Week and an executive board 
member of SNAC, said she thought 
Nadeau did a great job 

"In general, it's good to have any- 
thing that is going to promote a posi- 
tive body image, because no one is 
the cookie-cutter shape," she said. 

Davis, junior in family studies and 
human services, said since eating dis- 
orders and negative body image are 
so rampant across the United States, 
it is important to raise awareness. 

Lori Sanders, fifth -year senior in 
imtrition and kinesiology, also said 
she enjoyed prcsentatiun. 

"] see people everyday who have 
bad body images." she said "1 think 
it's important to show that it's not just 
(he way we look but about the way 
we feel" 

She agreed with Nadeau that to 
make a change, it starts with individ- 
uals. 

"It starts with us," she said. "It's 
our choice what we are going to do 
and how we are going to do it." 



Facebook, Ziddio to offer do-it-yourself reality show 



ByShtlUEIIIi 

KANUSStMECOlLEGIAN 



"Facebook Diaries" is a reality 
show that will allow students to 
share their personal stories with the 
world, said Kate Disston, spokes- 
person for Comcast Interactive 
Media. 

Pacebook.com and Ziddio com - 
a multi-platform Web site allowing 
ihare-user video owned by Comcast 
- are encouraging students to sub- 
mit video segments in contests that 
will select the content of the televi- 
sion series, "Facebook Diaries" 

The first contest will launch in 
late March, and the first "Facebook 
Diaries" episode shortly thereafter, 
Disston said. 



Facebook users will be able to 
upload, view and rate the videos 
displayed on Ziddio. 

"The marriage between the two 
companies (Ziddio and Facebook) 
is a nice creative outlet for students 
to have the chance to share their 
lives," Disston said 

Disston said Comcast will be se- 
lecting videos based on quality and 
professionalism. 

"We are hoping for all types of 
stories such as real-life stories like 
heartbreak and war time," she said. 

R) Cutler will produce the 
10-cpisode (30 minutes each! TV 
series. He has produced Emmy- 
Award winning reality shows such 
as "'Black and White," "American 
High" and "30 Days." 



Disston said Cutler will make 
Ihe final decision on what video 
segments will be chosen for the se- 
ries. 

"We want people to express 
themselves in an artistic way," she 
said. "We are confident that people 
will submit thought-provoking ma- 
terial while remaining dignified " 

She said the series will be broad- 
cast through Comcast On Demand 
cable providers, and Comcast also 
is discussing options of additional 
cable operations, 

"This marriage is for the first 
time bringing this kind of unique 
dimension to entertainment," she 
said 

Caroline Marks, general man- 
ager of Comcast Interactive Media, 



said video sharing is popular among 
Facebook's nearly 18 million users. 

Naomi Moka-Moliki, senior in 
electronic journalism and Facebook 
user, said the "Facebook Diaries" 
is not any different from YouTitbe. 
com as far as people being able to 
put anything on the Web. 

She said she hopes the "Face- 
book Diaries" will maintain a 
straightforward. 

If she were to send in a video, 
she said, she hoped she could ex- 
press her views on Christianity. 

"If very specific topics are ex- 
pressed such as a show specifically 
about Christian faith then I think 
it is OK," she said "But if not, I 
wouldn't have time to let my voice 
be in vain" 




HOROSCOPES 

Vaw WHJdy AjKt fw Fed 28 ~ Mm. 6 

Aquarius 

You an mdtf Anandat <tHls ttui 
will bring you Mn c»h. Keep a 
looli out for any mdlvidiub eager 
(D confront jfou. Vou un anger others quiddy Itib 
week. Wednesday will b« your ludy day. 

Aries 

Take time to <to MiTwthirvg nia ■ 
foi irourself. Romantk opportu- 
nities will be plerttiful K you get 
out and mir>gle Uncertainty about your rtlatkin- 
ship is pffvalent. Saturday will bt your ludiy day. 

Cancer ' 

You un expw to haw a 
passionate time if you go out 
with someone. You may find 

yourself In an uncomfortable situation. Friday 

will be your ludy day. 






Capricorn 



Find a quiet spot where you can' 
worit diligently and stay out 
of the way Don't play m your 
partner's emotions. Oo r^ot avoid situations that 
nuy detemrate Sunday will be your iuciiy day. ; 




Gemini 



Your dynamk, determined 
approach will win favors as w«ll 
as a helping hand. RKognhkin 

will be yours if you meet your deadline. Monday 

will be your lucky day. 



m 



Libra 



You will haveto help family 
menVbefs sort out unforturute 
difficulties. Your efforts will not 
go unnotked; however, someone you work with 
may get jealous. Wednesday will be your lucky day. 



12 



Leo 



You are best to stkit to younelf 
this week. Gel together with 
those ycHi find stimulating. Yot^ 
boss could make It hard to do your work ef^- 
thwly. Monday will be your lucky day. 




Pisces 



Insincere gestures of friendlmesj 
are likely to occur. Secret love 
affairs may be enticing; however, 
you must be prepared for the restraints thai will 
fallow, Sunday will be your tucky day. 



^ 



Scorpio 



You must not lead someone on 
or show interest tn them for the 
wrong reasons. Spend the day 

on responsibilities that need to be taken care of 

Friday will be your lucky day. 



B 



Sagittarius 



You will accomplish the most in 
your work environment. Make 
sure all of yow travel and driver's 
documents are in order. You will 
be able to get your way if you use your charm and 
know-how. Friday will be your lucky day. 




Taurus 



Listening un be more valuable 
than being a chatteitwji. Your 
male will appreciate your 

honesty. Do not rely on others to do your work. 

fake the Hrtte to help those less fortunate. 

Saturday will be yuur lucky day. 




Virgo 



Difficultieswill result If you 
have 10 deal with controver- - 
sial groups this week. You will feel tired and : 
rundown If you have alknved yourself to get intck" 
a financial mess. Throw yourself into yow wort. 
Thursday will be your lucky day. 

— wmw.<Ktmhgf-oiillmMm 



BUTTERED l goned to colledge. 



o 



Hey, Dahk. That's a 

pnrtty bt0 book you 

have there. 



Yeah, I know. \t doesn't 
have picrtures either. 




Nic;e, 5o, what Is 
the plcttire-lce© 



book about? 



How should I know. Orion? I 

just carry it around and 

pretend to read It to look 

smart. 





norida suite (1t-11,e-9 ACQ 

Wt: 47 1 SOI: 16 Mia 44 

iMMUffii 
i9iin««n the Sanlnsto s««med 
lite t MmMiM tod Aer kMdtnt off Duke on 
Ac rwL Sto tm, ttxy hm gam \-i, luMiif 
lest thee 9H(iti bv ft jNlMl n Its dllh9 the 
sMd). Thejr «■ iN«4 ID MA slm( MMl 
it 1 win or twe In the CDnlmnce 
iDuniiinent 



West Virginia {19-\^ Ug East) 

M>l:n|$0S:10r|Ust1lhH 

■■illillllMir « NBt.12 mOufjIlK n. Ondnruti 

OntlMk: nw Memtitoetn on ptv tfiHr way «nto 

lti('BlgDHO<wMilwlnn«rMa UFIttsbui^h 

A Its, Imwcdk and thtyl hM* Kmw woHi to 

4o )n tite Big EatfeumnKfiL 



San DIago State (18-8, 9-5 MWC) 

tMMhiliit 9«MK It Uuh (lil»),vi.TCU 
OmMc the Aziea tuw a quHtir win nw Air 
Font, but outside pf thit, thm Is not mitch to 
. egtdted about Th^ probably need to 
Win the lift two games iM nuke tt 
deep Into the Moontwi WeK 
Tournament. 



N 



{2M,12-«MVO 

«PI:lS|SOS,«]ll$t10;M 



OMiMfc The eean v^fti i fairly 
dHhadt tchidvie and beat WfecofHln 

ifr44 w Nov. R isn't thit 



TIPOFF 

GUIDE 

www.kstatecollegiaij,ia?m | Wednesday. Feb.. 28, 2007 | Vol, 111, No. 1 12 




Texas Tedi (18^ it? Big 12) 



HmMIUM jp 

MmIgOm 



: n. Sayloi, at kiwa Sute 
> <xrtiMy cmM ai^ue the Hed R^iden 
belong m matUr hwr they Anish. They haw three 
who agtkut tQfi-10 teams, sweeping Teie A&M and 
beatlM Kinas. Twertty vrins should be the magic 
nuffoer to entun a spot. 





OWahoma Statt (IPTM llg 12) 

ltFI:5l|SQS:»|listMt',}'; 



: vs. K-Stale (laak at taidai at Nebniki 

OwtlMkthis will be an tntensdng debate forthetMMiiltM, 

who mtift deddi If the itren^ ol the Cowtojn' noA- 

coflferRKe wins (Syitcut Ftttsbwrfh, bWHllll 

State ) are good emugh to gH Ami • ^ kl 

the hcM IMng M trat mad wbn does not 

help tMoft. Neither does a losh^ 

confefence record. 





AlabanunfrVvSK) 

RPI:41|S0S:S1{Ust10:4-« 



i| giMi:ii Olc Mtev at MkstulppI State 

OutMi: After a tM itwt the CikKon Tide wm 

nattonally ranked. It aH has been downhill since. 

Ihey have gone 6-8 since a 7&-SS wm over 

OUahony on Jan i and protialily need 

to win their hiul two gaines and do 

tome dama^ in the SEC 

Toumament 



K-SUte(20-9,9-SBi9l2) 

Rf1:SS|S0S:94|LastW:M 

Remaining gamti: at Oklahoma SUte (late), vs. Oklahoma 

Outlook; if the Vmidats can gel to 22 wins, it would be tough to 

kttf them out of the tournament. Double digit wins in th« 

Big )2 plus a top-few osntennce finish is nothing to 

ht ashamed «t and coach Bofa Kuggms has 

reiterated all week the strength erf 

the confeierKe, 




onthebubble 

TTic NCAA Tournament field is far from being set, even with the major- 
ity of spots already being accounted for. Tucked behind all of the teams 
that punched their toumament tickets long ago are a deep field of hopc- 
fuU. These are the teams considered to be on the "bubble," those teams 
with an incomplete r^sum^ and woric left to be done. 

K<State is among the teams on the bubble and will be one of several 
teams that need to finish strong in order to advance to the "Big Dance." 
Late-season losses and poor showings in conference tournaments could 
shatter a team's chances. On the opposite end of the spectrum, a late push 
and a few quality wins might be just enough. 



Purdue (18-1(^;^lfllg 10) 

ilPt:4g|S0S:)1|L»ll>:S-5 

RmhUH fMms: vs. Mhmesoa, 

VI Northwestern 
OvtlMfc: Conrnon befief is tftat Jfi vrins and i 

winning conference fKord is good Mwugh to 
make the toumanwiL'The 8oile(Tryk»i 
might end up being proof that It 
bnoL 





Illinois (2V^,9-6«ig 10) 

Remaining (mmi: at towa 
OutlMk: Nothing ilRnoishasdgiMiotmtfcratnih 
nament bid, but their toUl My flf warfc agilMt 

a solid Big to schedule siwuU be tMugh to 
get them in Their best wtm M against 
unranlted Indiana and Mkhi- 
gan State. 



Indiana (18'^-6 Big 10) 

IW:2J I SOS; II I Last 10:5-5 

Renuinlnf gimcs: at Northwestern, n, hnn State 

Orteo k : first-year in<lnna cwch KehrtoSaWpMinhas 

his team on the verge of makirvg the taurunent, 

bantrtg a total collapse. One mo(¥ win shouM 

be enough h^r the Hoosiers, who have 

played a competitne schedule 

ftom Stan to finish. 




m 



\ 



Gonzaga (2M0, 11-3 West Coast) 

Rfl:«lSOS:901Last)(^7J 



Outittok: The itrcngth of teams from majortonleiences 

might force Gonuga to win the WCC tournament. 

iMses to M. Mary's and Loyota IManmount do 

not kwk good, but there still is hope for 

an at-liige bid M things fall the 

Bulkings'way. 



vyj/ 



^Vj 




to 



Mississippi (18-10, 7-7 StQ 

fiPI:«|S0S;?JlUlt1ft6-* 

RMmlnhit |MMti at AUuma, vs. Auburn 

Outlotli: Every game is a must -win for the 

UHiging Rebels, tonight's clash with 

Alabanu could be an elimination 

game. 




Old Dominion (23-7715-3 CM) 

RPI;}4lSOS:9JtUst10:HM) 

R«iMinlng|aii 

OMtotkltim cmM bt B ntfiy It three teams 

to make R from tht CMl An kiVRstivt 1 }-point 

win over lieotgeUwi, aid I iMiig fMsh to 

the SMSon rt^ Ik Hit eitn shove 

Old Dominkin needed Id earn 

a spot In the field. 



Oklahoma breakdown Page 2 1 Where are they now? Former men's players Page 5 1 Former women's players Page 6 



Page 2 



TIPOFF GUIDE 



Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2007 




Player to watch 

Senior forward Cutler Mjirtln 

will play hi$ last gun« » a 

Wildcat Saturday at B rami age 

Cobseum. He ranks sitth on 

K- State'* all-time icoiing liit 

with 1,417 points. 



K-State women vs. Oklahoma State 
6 tonight 

K-State men vs. Oklahoma 

2:30 p.m. Saturday 



Player to watch 

Senior guani Claire Coggiiii 
will play her final game at 
Bramlage lanight Saturday. 

l oggtni> M:ored only tout points 
io sh« Hill want 1(1 finish her 
k Mate k.aieer on a high ntite 



e Court 

with Ashley Sweat 

fty Jontthan Pottw 

KANSAS SWECOUtOIAN 

McDonald's All American Ashley Savat has never asked for a discount at the gold 
en arches. The 6-toot-2 freshman from McPherson, Kan., loves to meet neui people 
Sweat said the most eligible guy on the K-Siate mens basketball team ts junior Ryari 
Patswald. She recently answered questions mnging from her best spring break trip to 
her favorite music star. 

Q. What was the beat ipriiig break trip you've ever been on? 
A. I had a lot of fun in Miami with the team this year We went to a lot of nice restau- 
rants, but the beach was the highlight. I laved being on the beach ^ 

Q. What Is your favorite action movie? 

A. Probably "Ocean's Eleven," but I don't really like action movies that much I like 

thinking side of movies. 



Q. How dose of friends are you and sophomore Marlies Gibsoit, being from the same 
hi^ school? 

A. We're really close We were best friends all through high school, and 1 knew I wanted to 
go to the same college as her We both wanted to come to K-State 

Q. Do you get discounts al McDonald's for being a McDonald's All-American? 

A. No. but I wish I did though because 1 go there all the time I would only ask for &ee food 

there if 1 knew someone that worked there 

Q. What ii something about you that few people would know? 

A. 1 can talk to anyone. 1 am extremely outgoing and also I love using big words. T^o 

of my favorite vocabulary words are ubiquitous and [uxtapose 

Q. Are you more of a book worm or a movie buff? 

A. I like to read books for leisure, but would say I am in to movies more 1 like to 

quote movie tines. 

Q. If you could date any music star who would It be? 

A. Justin Timberlake. 1 love his new CD I think he's avt-esome, and I'm in love 

with him. 

Q. Who is the most eligible guy on th« men's basketball team? 

A. 1 would go with Ryan Patzwald We re prettj* good friends, so he is probably 

my favorite I am partial to Bill Walker though because he's Bill Walker, and 1 love 

him 

Q. What is it like being so tail? L^ 

A. People always start talking about my height at the grocer>' store ■nie>'11 ask how 

tall my parents are and if I play basketball It's pretty funny. ^ 

Q. What is your favorite restaurant to eat at in Manhattan? 





Photo by Chm H»n«winck*l | COlttQAN 



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Pitchers 

tvory 

^Vednesday 




I ^P WTiiif tht Wildcat! 
lA^f don't h*vt t iupentu 
I ^f guard, the)' do h»vt t 
vcTMtile. eip<nencfd 
backcoun. At point guard, Clcnl 
Stewkft plan !>oli«l d«l'<nu, takes 
care of the ball and hit& timely 
•bote. LuK« Harm provides ath- 
leticism and eiploiiveneM, and 
Akeem VV'right pia>ii shut- down 
defenir and pahs key rebounds. 



GUARDS 



Michael N(al leads the [ 
(Mdahoma backcourt in 

scoring at 10.2 point* j 

per fpune, but his accu- 
racy from behind the 3- point arc la 
down more than 12 percent from 
last season (30.4 per^xnt com- 
pared to 42.8 a year ago). Aguiut a 
K-SUte squad that leads the Big 12 
Conference in 3 -point defense, he 
could be in for a rough afternoon. 



~^pF K'State it a complete- 
^^f ly different leant when 
^ I Hoskins brings his 
offensive game. After 
a subpar outing against Kansas, 
the junior forward exploded for 
21 points against Colorado on 
Saturday. When Hoskins is on, 
he can score in a variety of ways 
— perimeter jumpers, drives to 
the basket and shots in the paint. 
K-Statr will need plenty of scor- 
ing from him against OU. 



FORWARDS 



Senior Nate Carter 
has come on strong in 
Big 1 2 Conference play, 
averaging more than 16 
points and seven reboundi per 
game. He also shoots nearly 87 
percent from the foul line. At 
6-foot -6, 220 pounds. Carter 
has the ability to play small 
or power forward, much like 
Hoskins. The Carter vt. Hoaklns 
could be the marquee matchup 
in this contest. 



CENTERS 



For the most part, 
K-Slatc has won by 
playing a small lineup. 
However, the Wildcats 
could need solid minutes from 
lason Bennett, Serge Afeli and 
Luis Colon against OU. K-State*s 
defense has been vulnerable on the 
interior (Aleks Marie, anyone!), 
so slowing Oklahoma's Longar 
Longar will be a top priority. 



:a! 



in case you missed it, 
Oklahoma's 6-foat- 1 1 
center. Longar Longar, 
elbowed Texas Tech's 
Esmir Rizvic, earning him a two- 
game suspension and put Rizvic 
out for the season. We mention this 
only because K- State's post players 
must be ready to iitand toe- to- toe 
with Longar, a physical player who 
also poMfs a threat utTenstvely. 



COACHING/X FACTOR 



VT~fr ^'"b senior day and 
^^^^j an NCAA Tournament 
! ^r I berth on the line, expect 
coach Bob Muggins to 
have his team ready to play. 



If K State struggles 
early, look for Oklahoma 
to hang close. Still, 
it's tough to imagine 
K-State losing this crucial game. 



Prediction: K-State 68, Oklahoma 59 



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, Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2007 



TIPOFF GUIDE 



Page 3 



Few K-State players have N BA potential 



Fans who look at the 
K- St ate roster would almost 
unajijmously agree Bill Walk 
er has the potential to 
make an NBA roster 
once he decides to 
declare for the draft. 

There are other 
Wildcats, albeit not 
many, who also have 
the potential to reach 
the NBA, and here are 
a few who might have 
a chance. 

Senior Akeem Wright 
could make an NBA roster 
because of his defensive pres- 
ence. 

- One of the few things Bob 
Huggins and ]im Woolridge 
had in common is they both 
used Wright on the other 
team's best scoring threat. 

Another of Wright's talents 
is his rebounding ability and 
what I like to call is his "ex- 
tendo" arms 

,, Plus, he has an under- 
estimated lumping ability. 
His equivalent in (he NBA 




is Bruce Bo wen, minus the 
outside shooting. 
It breaks my heart to 
say this, but senior 
Cartier Martin does 
not have much of a 
chance to make it 
to the NBA We all 
know he can score 
and shoot the ball 
really well, but he is 
not the type of athlete 
wanted at the NBA 
level. 

He would have to play 
wing because of his lack of 
an inside game At that spot, 
he has to create his own shot, 
which he struggles to do at 
the college level. He also 
would need to extend his 
3 -point shot to NBA range. If 
so, he could be a nice addi- 
tion to a team in need of a 
spot -up shooter 

The next player might be 
best on the gridiron, and that 
is junior David Hoskins. 

I don't know if he could 
make it in the NBA If you 



watched the Kansas game 
at Bramlage Coliseum, KU 
sophomore Julian Wright 
guarded him, who is quicker 
and longer than him. 

Hoskins ended up shooting 
2-ofl5 from the field. The po- 
sition Hoskins is most likely 
to play at the next level would 
match him up with guys like 
Wright every game. His best 
bet for a professional sports 
career might be in the NFL. 
He has a body like San Diego 
Chargers tight end Antonio 
Gates and is just as good of 
an athlete. 

Another player who has 
a legitimate chance is Luis 
Colon, One of his obvious 
qualities is his passion for 
the game He will improve 
because of that passion and 
become a force inside at the 
college level. 

He already is pretty tal- 
ented defensively (not count- 
ing the game at Nebraska) 
and only will improve under 
Huggins' leadership. 



The player on K-State's 
roster with the best chance 
of making an NBA roster is 
none of other than the giant 
himself, freshman |ason Ben- 
nett. 

He is 7-foot-3 and 265 
pounds, but before he leaves 
he probably will add 20 to 
30 pounds to his frame and 
improve his coordination. His 
offensive game might never be 
pretty, but it will be efficient. 

People have been overly 
critical of him this season, 
saying he was a bust, but they 
need to remember he is a 
freshman, and freshmen un- 
der Huggins' tutelage usually 
improve significantly. 

Things are going to start 
changing during the next few 
years with Huggins He will 
continue bringing in players 
NBA scouts want. 



RyM Witt )> I tentw in [ngllili 
Mid priRl JmnMlttin. Ple«H ttoi 
w wi ai ab to iperti i^^wti.bit.edltf . 



Women's AP Top 25 



1.0ul(e(49| 
Z.Teflmund) 
i. ConneaiOft 

, ,4. North (arolma 

,.S Ohio State 

.£. Mjiyldnd 

. 7. Sunford 



1,249 
1,200 
1,142 

loss 

1,020 
993 

919 



578 



'8. George Washington SS2 

• 9. Arizona State 849 

10. Georgia 802 

1 Mouisiana Slate 740 

12.0lil)Kaina fi97 

:i3.Vanderbitt 670 

': 14. Tow MM S» 



IS. Purdue 
1(.B«ylor 

17. Middle lertn. St. 

18. Rutgers 

19. Bowting Creen 

20. Louisville 

21. Wise. Green Bay 

22. Michigan State 

23. Marquette 

24. N.C. State 

25. California 
Other iiq 12 teams receiving 
votes: lawa Stite 26, Kebintlt) 10 



494 
367 
222 
218 
206 
194 
191 
183 
87 



Men's AP Top 25 

1. Ohio State (62) 1,786 n.Teuf 7M 

2. UCLA (10) 1,729 16. Louisville 6Si 
!. K«»u 1,5M 17. Oregon 466 
4.Wi«oniin 1,S03 18. Butler 457 

5. Florida 1,488 l9.Vindert)ilt 317 

6. Memphis 1,422 20. Marquette 299 
7,Teu$A»M 1408 21. Virginia Tech 293 
S. North Carolina 1,381 22. Notre Dame 279 

9. Georgetown 1,225 23. Southern California 254 

10. Nevada 1,160 24. Maryland 247 

11. Southern Illinois 1,057 2S. Air Force 236 

1 2. Pittsburgh 984 Ottier Big 12 teams rKclvIng 
13 Washington State 974 votes; K-SUte 11 

14. Duke 77S 



League leaders (as of Monday) 


I 


Men 




^^V Scoring 


m 

K7 


Rebounds 

1.K.0<nat(lfn 


m 

11.3 


m 2.M.eog^n(05Ul 


20i 


IKMkm 


11 


■ IJ.jKks<in[nU) 


1M 


3.W.iolMson(l$Ul 


8.1 


1 4,A.M»rtc(NU) 


1W 


4.U.8og9Mi(0$lI) 


S.0 


P mUwItUtU) 

V' 


17.6 


5.i.m9ht(KU) 


10 


HP Assists 


AK 
6.61 


Field-goat shooting 

1.A.IMaric(NVI Sn 


^ 2.Cllldi«*M(NU) 


■S.74 


2.M.So9gan(OSU) 


549 


f lHUwdAMU) 
f 4. S.Kanrah(MU) 


SJ9 
4» 


3.K.la9m{WI 
4.A.Uw(TAMU) 


526 
ill 


5.ILieQt)irBon(Kll) 


459 


5.M.ZiM(mi) 


jm 


^ 


Women i 


fu.lMs(OU) 


m 
in 


Rebounds 

I.CPiislOU) 


RPti 
1S.9 


2,S.IMoa)y(BU) 


111 


ll.McfarbndlCU) 


10.9 


}.J.McF*riand(CU) 


m 


3.e.Mo<tv(BU) 


9i 


^ 4.T.MsQn(UT) 


16.9 


4.T.J*doon(t/D 


8.9 


■ S,i fuddle (MU) 


m 


S,A.(lobefiion(TTU) 


8.6 


^^ Assists 

rTlMeddendSU) 


AK 
6.54 


Field-goal shooting 

F6P 
1.J.Mcfarland(CU) .611 


P 2.S.Lilinint(KSU) 


S.14 


ICPartsiOU) 


585 


3.A.lliley(0SU) 


5.00 


3.D.Gant(TAMlf) 


.569 


4,C.Cotti)o(Lfr) 


4.85 


4K.Grtfnn(NLI) 


557 


S. A. Franklin aAMUl 

El 


4.81 


5.Rbhiifaids(mi) 


A 



5 Games to watch 



Collegian hoops picks 



Ccdr^iMFtamtofllS-Ki) 

K-State men vs. K-Stale 

Oklahoma (Sat.) 81-77 

K-State v^onwn vs. OSU 

Oklahoma State 63-59 

N«.7TexasA&M3t TeusA&M 

No, 15 Texas 89-78 

No 2 UCLA at UCtA 
No. 13 Washington State (Thurs.) 79-75 

No. 12 Pittsburgh at Marquene 

No.20Man|uette(S«t.) 72-69 




ivi C\ 



JtfflWwIIMl 

Sptftl Mtlttf 
IMWMkd-ll 

K-Stile 
7fM 

OSU 

68-62 

Texas A&M 
85-81 
UOA 

ai-7$ 

Uaniuette 
77-72 



t^ t_ 

NKiiilunn 114-11) 
Sptfti wrtttr 

uitwMitai) 

K-StHe 
6^60 
K-Sute 
77-60 

Texas A&M 
65-61 
UCLA 

70-57 

Marquette 

76-75 



*u>tiiiM«k{16-9) 
Sfwrtt ciiiuimM 
LutWMtlM) 

K-Siate 
68-S9 
OSU 
63-55 

Teas 
7S-71 

UCLA 
79-64 

Martfuette 
73-68 



Big 12 Conference standings (as of Monday) 



Standings Conference Overall 



Standings Conference Overall 



Men's 

Kansas 
Texas A&M 
Texas 
K-Stvtt 
Texas Tech 
Missouri 
Oklahoma 
Oklahoma State 
Nebraska 
Iowa State 
Bairlor 
Colorado 



W 





W 


L 




26 


4 




24 


4 




21 


7 




20 


9 




18 


11 


8 


17 


10 


9 


15 


13 


8 


19 


9 


8 


16 


11 



Women's 

Oklahoma 
Texas A&M 
Baylor 
Iowa State 
Hetiraska 



W 

12 
12 
11 
9 

9 



OlitahomaSute 7 



9 

11 

12 



14 
13 
6 



14 
14 
18 



Texas 

Texas Tech 
Colorado 
Missouri 
K-Stite 

Kansas 



3 

3 
4 

6 

6 

8 

9 

9 

9 

10 

IT 

12 



W 

22 
22 
24 
21 
21 
19 
17 
15 
12 
17 
16 
9 



4 

5 
5 

7 
8 

9 

12 

14 

15 

11 

12 

19 




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Page 4 



TIPOFF GUIDE 



Wednesday, Feb, 28, 2007 



Women's update 

% 

Am 

% 



1, No. 12 OhUhenM (22-4, 12<1) — Sophomore Courtnty 
Parii set Otlalvomi's arm riHfk tor offensive rebcwnds when she 
grabbed h«r ] Hth jg^inst Missouri on Sunday. 
Lait game: ^^-^^ win n. Missouri 
Ntftfanw: Tontghi n. Baylof 



2. Na. UTtut AM (22-S, 12-}) — Sophomore Danietle 
Gdnt came off the bench and scored a game-higfi 22 points and 
grabbed six rebounds against Baylor on Sunday. 
Ust game: 63 SS win at Baylor 
Nixt game: Tonight n. Texas 



J. No. 16 Baylor (24-5, 1M) — Texas km held Baylor, the 
second plate team in the conference in scoring offense, 17 poinb 
below Its ieason aveiage of 75.1 . 
Last gam«; 63-S8 loss vs. Texas A&M 
Ntxt game; Tonight at Oklahoma 



4. Iowa Statt (21-7, 94i — K-State held sophomore NklEy 
Wieben. the Big 1 2 Player of th« Week for the week of Feb. 12)8, 
to just two shots and fiw poirvts Saturday. 
Last gam«: 6461 win at K- State 
H«rt game: Thursday at Texas Tech 





T 



S. N(br«k« (214, 9-<) — Senior Kiera Kanly made a season- 

Ihtgh six Jpointen Satu^ay in the Muskets' fourth -straight defeat. 
Uft gamt; 63 60 loss at Oklahorru State 
i] Next game: Tue^ayvs. Colorado 



6, Oklahoma State (19-9, 7^8) — freshman Andrea Riley 
stored 17 points in the Cowgiris' first victory owr 3 ranked op- 
ponent under head coach Kurt Budke. 
Last game: 63-60 win vs. Nebraska 
Neirt game: Tonight at K -State 



7. Tikis (17-12, 6-9) — Texas eamed coath Jody Conradt her 
699th career win Saturday against Texas Tech. Only one other col- 
legiate coach - Tennessee's Pat Summit - has surpassed 900 wins. 
lut game: 59-47 win vs. Texas Tech 
Next game: Tonight at Texas A&M 



S. Texas Tech (1 5- 14, 6-9) — After defeating then-No. 19 

Nebraska on Feb 1 4, the Lady Raiders have gone on » three -game 

losing skid. 

Last game: 59 47 loss at Texas 

Mcxt game: Thursday vs. Iowa State 



9, Colorado (12-15, 6-9) — Jurtlor Jackie McFarland, the 

conference's third -leading scorer, had just six points against the 

iayhawks on Saturday. 

L«t game: Tuesday at Nebraslta lUle) 

Next game: Big 12 Conference Tournament 



10. Missouri (17-11, S-16) — Senior Cariynn Savanl went just 

2 of 7 from the field at Oklahonu on Saturday and hnished with 

eight points. 

Ust game: 72-57 loss at Oklahoma 

Next game: Thursday vs. Kansas 



11. K-State (16-12, 4-11) — Freshman Ashley Svwat has aver- 
aged 19 4 points ovet the Wildcats' last hv« games. 
Last game: 64-61 win vs. Iowa State 
Next game; Tonight vs. Oklahoma State 



12. Kansas (9-19, 3-12) — Freshman Danielle UcCray scored i 

game -high 20 points against Colorado Saturday. 
Last game: 59 SO loss at Colorado 
Next game: Thursday vs. Kansas 



— Compiled by iessi Htmandet 



Wildcats to face Oklahoma State 
in final regular season game 



By ImsI HamaiKkz 

KANSAS SIATtCOlLEGIAN 

This season, it seems tike the K-State 
women haw been on a roUer-coaster ride 
of sorts After opening the season with a 
stunning 64-59 loss to less- than -formi- 
dible Emporia State in an exhibition on 
Nov. 5, the Wildcats won 12 of their next 
13, including a 72-67 home victory over 
cturent-No 21 Wisconsin -Green Bay. 

After opening Big 12 Conference play 
with s 78-58 defeat at the hands of reign- 
ing conference champs and then-No 8 
Oklahoma on [an 3, K-State appeared to 
be in for another loss to a top conference 
opponent when then- No. 17 Tbxas A&M 
came to tosvn Ion 6. 

Instead, the Wildcats pulled oft a 48-45 
upset, sparking hopes that this team could 
make the NCAA Tournament. 

The roller coaster took a downward 
turn following the Wildcats' crushing 81- 
66 defeat of Missouri on fan. 13 - sopho- 
more Marlies Ctpson was injured during 
practice Since then, Gipson has spent 
every game on the bench, and K-State has 
gone 2-10, often managing just one solid 
half uf play Only one uf those wins, a nar- 
row 59-55 decision over Kansas, came at 
home Since Gipson's injury, the Wildcats 
have gone 1-4 at Bramlage Coliseum. 

The team came close to finally pulling 
off that elusive home win Saturday against 
Iowa State. K-Statc led throughout the 
game - once by as much as 14 ~ but in 
the final minutes of the second half, the 
cyclones managed to overcome the defi- 
cit and snagged a 64-61 win 

K-State experienced a similar slump 
during the 2005-06 season, dropping its 
last four regular-season home games. 

The Wldcats (16-12, 4- U Big 12) will 
take the flour at Bramlage tonight - for 
the seniors, it could be the last time they 



play at home - to face Oklahoma State 
in the final game of the regular season. 
If the Wildcats come out on top, it could 
help their chances at securing a Women's 
National Invitation Tournament bid - but 
considering Oklahoma State's. 

The players said though it is unlikely, a 
win certainly is possible 

"You've got to understand that it's an 
unpredictable game, and being in such 
a tough conference like the Big 12, any 
given night anybody can beat anybody, so 
no game is guaranteed,' said sophomore 
Shalee Lchning. "Everybody is going to 
fight 'til the end, mid that's something 
that - when we've put one or two halves 
together - it's amazing to see that we've 
stayed in those games." 

Oklahoma State (19-9, 7-8) is in sixth 
place in the Big 12. Though the Cosvgirls 
got off to a slow start, they since have se- 
cured wins over Iowa State and then -No 
25 Nebraska and swept Texas for the first 
time since the 1997-98 season. 

Senior Rash id at Sadiq is 11th in the 
conference in scoring, averaging a team- 
high 13 points per game, as well as 6.1 
rebounds Freshman Andrea Riley has 
averaged 12.3 points, five assists and 2 1 1 
steals per game. She was named Rookie 
of the Week by the Big 12 for games in- 
cluding team-high 18- and 17-point per 
formances against Texas and Nebraska, 
respectively. 

"Andrea's just really played terrific as a 
Big 12 rcxikie." said coach Deb F^tterscjn 
"She's just played very good basketball 
- (Oklahoma State is) a very confident 
team, and they don't get rattled, and I 
think she's been a big part of that " 

The Cov^^ris sit near the lop of the 
Big 12 in scoring offense {71.7 points per 
game) and scoring defense (571 points 
per game) and reboimding margin (-1-8.1 
rebounds per game) but lack a strong pe- 




Cowgirl f mhnian Andru Rll«y MrnMJ her 

third Big 1 2 Conference Rookie of the Week 
honor for games played Feb. T9-2S. 



rimeter game. 

K-State is one of the top defending 
teams from behind the arc; however, its 
inside game defensively has been hit or 
miss - but Patterson said it's something 
the team has improved in recent weeks. 

"I think our post players are very high- 
quality defenders," I^tterson said, "and 
significantly better - significantly better 
- than we were you know, the first third 
of the season in Big 12 play " 



Women's S Keys to Victory 



Wildcats to face the Oklahoma State Cowgirls 



By Dajme Logan 

KANSAS STATE [OllEGlAN 

1. QUEENS OF KANSAS 

K-Slate and Kansas will 
have some added motivation 
thi^ week If the Wildcats win. 
they will finish in 11th place 
in the Big 12 Conference but 
will be ahead of the [ayhawks 
A Wildcat loss and a Jayhawk 
win would mean the two teams 
share the title of best in Kansas 
and worst in the Big 12 



2.THE BIG FOUR 

Oklahoma State has four 
players averaging double-digit 
points this season. The Wild- 
cats will have to play physical 
early and try to gel the Cow- 
girls out of rhythm and off their 
games. 

3. GET EXTRA HELP 

In K-Stale's 64-61 loss to 
Iowa State on Saturday, only 
six Wildcats scored K-Stale 
needs to use its bench more 



efieetively this week so the 
starters can conserve their 
encrgj' for the late stages of 
the game. 

4. AWARD ASHLEY 

Freshman Ashley Sweat 
has scored 16 or more points 
in each of K-State 's last five 
games and has been the team's 
leading scorer in four. Sweat's 
performances have earned her 
the right to run the offense, and 
her teammates need to reward 



her by getting her the ball as 
often OS possible. ; 

5. MAKE FREE THROWS 

Against Iowa State, the 
Wildcats were a frustrating 6- 
of-16 from the foul line. In the 
end, it was this statistic more 
than any other that separated 
the two teams, If the Wildcats 
don't improve their shooting 
this week, fans can expect a 
similar result against Oklaho- 
ma State. 



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Wednesday, Feb, 28, 2007 



TIPOFF GUIDE 



Pig«5 



Where are they now? 



■yRyntWm 

A K-State men's basketball 
player has not been drafted 
into the NBA since Steve Hen- 
son went to the Milwaukee 
Bucks in the second round 
of the 1990 NBA draft NBA 
teams have drafted 34 players 
in the Wildcats' history, begin- 
ning with )iin Iverson, who was 
selected by the Boston Celtics 
in 1952. 

Not many Wildcat players 
lately have even made it onto 
an N BA roster. The last K-State 
player to sign with an NBA 
squad was Askia Jones in 1994, 
when he signed a contract with 
the Minnesota Timberwolves. 

The last Wildcat to come 
close to the NBA was fan 
favorite Jeremiah Massey. 
Massey averaged 17.9 points 
per game and 6.9 rebounds per 
game during his senior year, 
and averaged 14 7 and 78 dur- 
ing his junior year 

He signed with the Boston 
Celtics' summer league team 
in 2005 and played in two of 
six games, in which he scored 
a total of four points. 

He didn't make the team, 
and instead looked for playing 
time elsewhere. He traveled 
overseas and is playing for Aris 
"IT Bank in Greece, where he 
is averaging 13.4 points and 
8.4 rebounds per game. 



He played in the Greek All 
Star Game this year and scored 
a season- high 25 points. 

Most players who want to 
continue their basketball ca- 
reers after graduating from K- 
State usually must find oppor- 
tunities overseas. 

After finishing his K-State 
career last year, forward Dra- 
mane Diarra went to France, 
where he plays for a squad 
called the Reims. 

Perhaps the most surpris- 
ing Wildcat playing overseas is 
Pervis Pasco, who is known for 
the "Pasco Rasco" 

He famously traveled in 
celebration during the final 
seconds of the 2003 Big 12 
tournament game against Col 
orado. 

The Buffaloes, trailing 76- 
74, in-bounded the ball and 
banked in a 3 -pointer to win 
the game at the buzzer 

Pasco next traveled to South 
Korea to play professionally 

With the arrival of coach 
Bob Huggins, alt of K-State's 
future NBA prospects could 
change. 

He began coaching at Cin- 
cinnati in 1989, and during his 
tenure, 13 Bearcat players were 
selected in the NBA Draft. 

Three Top- 10 picks and one 
player, Kenyon Martin, who 
was drafted No 1 overall in 
the 2000 NBA Draft, played 
for Huggins at Cincinnati. 



Last year during the transition from coach Jim Woolrfd^ 
to Bob Huggirts, K-State lost three players. i;! 
Here are the updates on those playen: 




Ontb AMm -> Wtm Jm Wt»lrii^« wM And. Junior 
to^Curttt Mm milhetotiijumiithip. TbfUnq 
BMdv Caltr, riBtet MiKitncd tt Onl RDtMm, whm 

ht at (wt tfih KNf bKJUs* of NCAA triftifer mK 

Wbik <t K- Stale, Mkn averaged 2.4{K)lntsand1.8 ^ 
reboundi per game at a sot)homore and 1 5 points arid 
0.8 rebounds a a fri^hnun. 





TVIwHii^Hm— Hughes was ()olni} to b( putt _.. , 
Huggms' inaugural team at KSutt but WMiSllilMd *^> 
(or being in tht StMC^ SM offender ditabet. 

Hughes plays it HendmMi Sute In Aibddphu, 
Alt. He ii mnging 5.9 poinB and 4,6 fcbounds p«t 
9ime, and has started 24 of 27 ganw tfiis year Ml the 
Reddies. 

During hn last seauHi at K- State he averaged 1.7 
potaH ind two teiwuMk per game. 

Miilo Taybfw — The senior to-be guard was kkked 
oH the team at the same time senior Carller Martin was 
suspended. Taybron was dismissed foe vtoiatkvg the 
universtty's substance abuse polky. 

He averaged 4.8 points and 2i issistt per g«Tt« liit 
year for the WUdcaU. 



Needless to say, Huggins 
has the ability to recruit play- 
ers with NBA talent, and the 
players he is bringing in to join 
the Wildcats already axe con- 
sidered potential Top 10 picks 
m the 2008 draft. 



According to nbadraft.net, 
Micheal Beasley, who will )>e a 
freshman for the Wildcats next 
year, is slated to go second 
overall to the Memphis Griz- 
zlies - and he has yet to play a 
minute of NCAA basketball 



Oklahoma inconsistent in Capel's 1st year 



By Nick Dunn 

KItNSASitAttCOLLEGIAH 

In the world of college bas- 
ketball, it's probably best never 
to get too comfortable. There's 
no need to look too far for a 
perfect example. 

lust two weeks ago, Okla- 
homa was one of the hottest 
teams in the Big 12 Conference 
and looked like a legitimate 
NCAA Tournament hopeful. 
The Sooners were riding a 
four-game win streak, includ- 
ing victories over Texas Tech 
and Oklahoma State, and be- 
gan to skyrocket up the Big 12 
standings. 

How quickly things change. 

Oklahoma followed its four- 
game spurt with a five game 



587-8300 

1 1 . 1 www body tiril coiti 



skid to put itself out of Tour- 
ney talks and instead looking 
forward to a tournament of the 
three-letter variety (the Na- 
tional Invitation Tbumament) 

To say the Sooners' season 
thus far has been up-and-down 
could be viewed as a an under 
statement, Oklahoma has gone 
throu^ three four-game win- 
ning streaks and four losing 
streaks of two or more games 

"It's going kind of how we 
thought it would go," said first- 
year Sooner coach Jeff Capel. 
"When you're leaning on a 
lot of inexperience, 1 think at 
times you have to expect in- 
consistency." 

The inconsistency has 
spread even to individual per- 
formances, most notably se- 



nior Nate Carter. 

After not being much of a 
factor in the non-conference 
season - he scored 4.4 points 
per game and never led the 
team in scoring - Carter's pro- 
duction has seen an increase 
with the jump in competition. 

He is averaging 16.4 points 
in Big 12 games and has led the 
Sooners in scoring seven times, 
including a season-high 24 in a 
75 61 win overffexas Itch, 

Carter's offensive explosion 
has been nice, but the Sooners 
still are lacking, Capel said. 

"We've been playing with 
out a guy that can create op- 
portunities for other guys," he 
said. In some 

ways, Oklahoma has endured 
a season similar to K-State's. 




The Wildcats have had sepa- 
rate winning streaks of six and 
seven games, but have been 
unable to put it together night 
in and night out. 

Nearly every first-year 
coach is forced to rely on is de- 
fense, and both teams are near 
the top of the league in almost 
every defensive statistic. 

That, Capel said, gives him 
hope for the future, as does his 
players' effort 

"We've had (good times 
and bad times), but for the 
most part, we've played pretty 
hard," he said "Our defense for 
the most part has been pretty 
good, and that's a good foun- 
dation to start with But I'll tell 
you what, this league is very, 
very good 1 think it's the most 
underrated league in college 
basketball, and I feel fortunate 
to be a part of it " 

Such is the life under a first- 
year coach. 



Men's update 



1. Kanui (2(~4, 1J-2) — The Ja^awks aie on a six- 
game winning streak arKi have outsco^ed thelt last st> 
opponents by a combined 1<3 points. 
Last faMt: 67-65 win at Oklahoma 
Ntxt 9«mt; Saturday vs. feias 



2, Thu mm (2«-4, 11-21 — The Aggies are unde- 
feated in the Big 1 2 Conference this season against teams 
that are not coached by Bob Knight. 
Uttgamt: 97 87 win n B.ayh)r 
Ntxt gamt: Tonight at Texas 



3. Ttxif (21-7, 11-3} — Freshntan Kevin Ourant leads 
the Big 12 in scoring, averaging 24.7 points pet game, put- 
ting Texas in position to make a possible nin at the Big 12 
regular-season title. 
Lut lamt: 69- S8 win at Oklahoma 
Next gamt: Tonight vs Texas A&M 



4. K-Stitt (20-9, 9-5) — The Wildcats have not won two 
games in a row in more than three weeks. 
Lift gamt: Tuesday at Oklahoma State (late) 
Kixt gamt; Saturday vs Oklahoma 



S.TcKasTetli (11-11, 7-7) — The Red Raiders are 3 
against Texas A&M and Kansas, and those wins will be 
crucial when the NCAA Tournament selection committee 
begins picking teams for the tournament. 
Lilt game: 59-57 win vs. Oklahoma State 
Ktxt game; Tonight vs. Baylor 



6. Mliseuri (17-10, 6-» — Stefhon Hannah is second in 
the Big 1 2 with 2.6 steals per game and is part of a Tlget 
squad that has won three ohheit last four games. 
Lilt gimt: S2-77 loss at Nebraska 
Ntxt gamt; Tonight vs. Colorado 



7. Oklahomi (TS-13, 6-9) — The Sooners have lost five 
games in a row and need a big win Sattjrday. 
List gamt: 67 6S loss vs. Kansas 
Htxt gimt: Saturday at K State 

I. Ohlihomi Sutt (19-9, S-0) — The Cowboys are 0-6 on 
the road in Big 1 2 play and find themselves on the oubide 
looking in for the NCAA Tournament. 
Last game: Tuesday vs. K-State (late) 
Next game: Saturday at Baylor 



9. Nebristi (16-11, S-8) — Junior Aleks Mark is aver- 
aging more than 1 7 points per game and is fiist in the Big 
12 with a 56.} field -goal percentage. 
List game: 82-77 win vs. Missouri 
Ncit gimt: Tonight vs. Iowa State 



10. (owi Stilt (14-14, 5-9) — Since winning at Mis- 
souri in their hrst game of the Big U season, the Cyclones 
are 0-6 on the road. 
Last gamt: 89-52 loss at Kansas 
Ntxt gimt: Tonight at Nebraska 



IT.Biylor (13-14, 1-11) — The Bears are tied (or set 

ond in the Sig 12 in ) -pointers, making 2)8 attempts. 
Last gimt; 97-87 loss at Texas A&M 
Next game: Tonight at Texas Tech 



12. Colorido (6-t8, 2-11) — It's hard to find something 
positive to say about a Buffalo squad that has a lame duck 
coach in Ricardo fatten, has lost their last five games and 
have only won two conference games so far this year. 
Last gifflt: 87-71 loss vs. K-State 
Next game: Tonight at Missouri 




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Page 6 



TIPOFF GUIDE 



Wednesday, Feb. 28, 200t 



WHERE ARE THEY NOW? 




futHom 

Top l«ft: Magan Mahonay If the all-time leader in assists at K-Staf with 589 Top rlghtr Kcndra 
Wackar icorad the most points (2,333) in school history. Bottom loft: Nicola Ohida had her jersey 
rMired on March 3, 3004 Bottom right; Lauria Koahn li all-lime NCAA leader In i'i made with 392. 

Former Wildcats have successful careers 



By Dayna Lx>gt" 

KANSAS ^TATLCOllEGIAN 

It's no secret the K-SUte 
women's basketb^l team is 
struggling this season. The in- 
jury to sophomore Marlies Gip- 
son more than two months ago 
left the Wildcats with a void yet 
to be RUed, but Gipson is not 
the only one whose departure 
from the starting lineup has af- 
fected the team 

In ttie last three seasons, 
there has been a mass exodus of 
talent from the Wildcat roster 
Several star players were lost 
due to graduation and pursued 
careers in the WNBA. Others 
left K-State early and joined dif- 
ferent NCAA programs. Here's 
what the Wildcats are missing 
this season: 

KENDRAWECKER 

Wecker was drafted fourth 
overall by the San Antonio Sil- 
ver Stars 

In 2006. Wecker started 1 1 
games for the Silver Stars and 




Hamlin 



averaged 16.8 
minutes per 
game in only 
her second 
season. 

Recently, 
Wecker rep- 
resented the 
Silver Stats in 
a shooting stars competition at 
the 2006 NBA AllStar Game 
Wecker, along with San Anto- 
nio Spurs guard Ibny Pariier 
and Spurs legend Steve Kerr, 
won the competition. 

NICOLE OHLDf 

The original K-State crossover 
to the WNBA, Nicole Ohlde 
perhaps is the most decorated 
Wildcat woman in the school's 
basketball history 

Her accomplishments are 
reason for her No. 3 jersey to 
hang from the rafters of Bram- 
lage Coliseum. 

The Mirmesota Lynx select- 
ed Ohlde with the sixth overall 
pick in the 2004 draft After just 
one season in the pros, Ohlde 




worked her 
way into the 
startuig line- 
up and never 
looked back. 
In 2005 and 
2006. Ohlde 
started ev- 
ery game for Melntyro 
Minnesota So far in her career, 
Ohlde is shooting 45 percent 
from the field, collecting 5.7 rpg 
and averaging 10.8 ppg. 

UURIEKOEHN 

Koehn. much like Mahoney, 
was someu^at overshadowed 
by big names like Wecker and 
Nicole Ohlde during her career 
at K-State. 

Her numbers though, were 
enough to attract the attention 
of WNBA scouts, 

Koehn is a member of the 
Washington Mystics. She has 
yet to start a game but has come 
off the bench when the team 
needed a shooter Liast season, 
she shot 52 percent from 3- 
point range. 



MEGAN MAHONEY 

Maiioney was 34lh overall 
m the 2005 WNBA dr^ ~ the 
same draft as Wecker - by the 
Connecticut Sun. She is still 
with the Sun where she saw 
limited playing time last season. 

TWIGGY MCINTYRE 

One of two K-State starters 
to leave at the conclusion of the 
2005-06 season, TWiggy Mc- 
tntyre now plays her basketball 
at the University of Houston, 

This season Mclntyre is 
complying with NCAA transfer 
regulations by taking a one -year 
layoff, but she is expected to 
start for the Cougars next sea 
son. 

JOANN HAMLtN 

After jusl one season with 
the team, center JoArtn Hamlin 
is another player who left Man- 
hattan last summer to join a dif- 
ferent NCAA program. Hamlin 
now attends the University of 
Iowa where she too is sitting 
out for a year. 



2007 RECRUmNG CLASS; 



NotitDamePrrpSdwollFltdibur^Mtts. Z 

Btiiley m»dt his flm aftpearante JS a pljjm » 

in Minhittan on iumJay, and he was better than ;;. 

*dveftis«d, if that was wen poswblf . Z 

Th» highly-ratfd rKralt h*d JO points, 17 Z 

reboundi and four blods in jftrt 26 mtnut« during " 

theKU-SOnHitaflUGAcadenviOthtAII-Amefkan ^ 

SbooUHiLTht MVP of the 9arm showed his versitH- Z 

iity,s{»rin9 on'a variety of J-pflJnths,'po(fflflV)ws and ? 

dunks, ; 

' As imprKsiw as h« was on the couil Beasley • 

» pertiaps made the iTKHt noise after the game, when ^ 

he said he was (oming to K-State with the pUn of ~ 

staying foiaU four yeaik '. £ 

1 i II - ' ■ ■ ■' ' ' " ' ■ ■ .". ' t 



WmHn T. 




Baaslty 



kJl 



Brown 



Dwyef Hl9h School I Wet) Patm Beadt, Fli.. 

The Pamheis suffered a sbodiiig ^ to the* 
season on W> 16 wlien Sebastian River upset thetn 
6t'Se in the Class 5A regional quanerfinals. It am 
as a such a surprise because Sebastian (liver was play- 
ing in Its f^t regional tournament In school history 
and Dwyer was state champions In two of the past 
three seasons. 

Brown scored 14 point} In ttif lots, lodudlng a }- 
pointef with 1 1 seconds left to cut the ihiiii' lead to 
S9-58. After two flee throws rnade It 6t-!8, Brown's 
3-poiiiter rolled off (he nm as time eqwed. Dwyer 
finished the season 1S-9. 

Ttie Palm Bead) Pott contrtbirttd. 




Pulltn 




Sutton 



JacobPullm — 6'1|17Slbs.|Pa 

Proviso East High School | Mayvnod, III. 

Pullen's No. Cranked PIntes lost to Marshall 
~ the No. S team in the Chicago area - 5(M9 on 
Monday The point guarct had been fighting the flu 
all week, and his play reflected that. He went 4-o(-1S 
from the field and fouled out with 1:1} left in the 
fourth quarter. The game ended after Proviso East's 
Nathan Fuqua missed two free threws with 1.fi sec- 
onds left that could've bed or won the game. 

Proviso East sits at 14-} with a 5-D record in tix 
West Subuftan Gold Conference. . .;.•. 

Tlie CMugo Trtktine contributed. 



Donlnlqut Suttw - 6'4 |19S lbs | SF 

The PatlersBn Sctiool I tenon, N.t. 



The Bulldogs played ive games in six days ending 
with a game Monday night against Charts Prep. The 
Bulldogs are No. } in the latest rankings on hoopniio. 
com. 

Phone calls to the schooi weni unretumed, and 
no other information is availabe at this time. 



PhptDS tantributed by Si¥ah.cem. 




TUBBY ' S 





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are the 



Mention this ncl and receive 
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/^^K A N S A S STATE 

Collegian 



INSIDE 

A comedic 
opera by Mozart 
opens this 
weekend 




www kstatccoUegian.com 



Thursday. March 1,2007 



VoLnrNall? 



3,349 students participate in primary election; 17 votes separate top 2 candidate pairs 



ty Lof an C. Adami 

KANSAS STATE COLUGIAN 

It was close, yet not so close. 

Polls for the Student Govern- 
ing Association primary elections 
closed at 6 p.m. Wednesday, and the 



preliminary voting totals revealed 
that 17 votes separated the top two 
pairs of candidates for student body 
president and vice president. 

Matt Wagner, senior in infor- 
mation management systems, and 
Lydia Peek, junior in secondary 



education, were in the lead with 
1,514 votes, (im Mosimann. senior 
in political science and economics, 
and Nick Piper, junior in finance, 
received 1,497 votes. 

The two pairs will advance to 
next week's SGA genera) election. 



Nick Levendofsky, SGA elections 
commissioner, said the results were 
preliminary He said hnal tallies will 
be announced Thursday. 

Derek Ogan, senior in secondary 
education, and Aaron Blush, sopho- 
more in architectural engineering, 



were far behind the leading pairs 
with 167 votes and will not advance 
Steven Hilburn, junior in chemis- 
try and psychology, and Clare Fee- 
ley, sophomore in speech, also will 
not advance, as they received 133 
voles. 



2007 primary election proves 

EVERY VOTE COUNTS 



MOSIMANN-PIPER: l,497VOTES 




Chriiti>ph«r Han«w<nck«t | COUEGIAN 

Praftdtnt am) vkt prasldtntlal candldatas Jim Moilmann, right, and Ntck Plptr r«spond after hearing 
the results of the primary elections. The pair advanced to the general elections next week. 

Mosimann, Piper advance in second place 



•y Austin Appit 

KANSAS STATE COLUGIAN 

Kite's Bar & Grill went quiet 
as KSDB-FM-91.9 announced 
Jim Mosimann, senior in politi- 
cal science and economics, and 
Nick Piper, junior in finance, 
had made it past the student 
body presidential and vice-pres- 
idential primary elections. 

"1 think our campaign team 
and all of our supporters have 
done everything possible to put 
us in the best pc^sible position 
to be successful," Piper said. 

The pair had no regrete go- 
ing into the primari^, Mosi- 
mann said 

Mosimann and I^per earned 
1,497 votes - 44 7 percent of 
the overall votes counted 

Before the results were an- 
nounced, Mosimarm stood 
up and gave a short speech to 



those clad in the pair's green 
campaign shirts, During his 
speech, he thanked all of those 
who supported him during the 
campaign. 

"I think people like our mes- 
sage," Mosimann said. 

Mosimann and Rper's plat- 
form includes four main issues: 
expanding Peters Recreation 
Complex, making Thanksgiving 
break last one week, lobbying 
for more student parking in the 
proposed garage and creating 
an online textbook list. 

"These issues are starting to 
resonate with students, and I 
think we are running a friendly 
campaign, and the people are 
starting to like that," Mosimann 
said. 

The close final count shows 
the strength of the two sets of 
candidate, Piper said. 

"1 think for this voting turn- 



out there has been more than 
last year, so it shows that the 
students are caring about the 
issues that the candidates are 
putting forth," he said. 

Mosimann and Piper have 
almost a week before the gen 
eral election ends. 

"The key here in this week 
leading up to general elections 
would be to just continue to 
spread our message for all the 
students on campus," Piper 
said. 

During that time, the paif 
will continue to meet with stu- 
dent groups on campus. 

"We have met with 80 stu- 
dent groups so far, and our 
goal at the beginning of the 
campaign was 100," Mosimann 
said. "1 think we will be able to 
hit that number. I really do." 

Sm MOSIMANN P>g«T2 



WAGNER-PEELE: 1,514 VOTES 




Jotlyn Crown | COLLEGIAN 
Prastdcirilal candldata Matt Wagnar and vica-prtsldmtlal candidal* Lydla P««la, calcbraM at 

hearing they received the most votes. The duo won the primary election by just a hw votes. 

Wagner, Peele win primary by 17 votes 



By Joanna Rubick 

KANSAS STATE (01L(GIAN 

As soon as supporters heard 
"Matt Wagner," the rest of 
the results were lost to cheers 
Wednesday night at TXibby's 
Sports Bar 

Matt Wagner, student body 
presidential candidate, and 
Lydia Peele, vice presidential 
candidate, won the primary 
elections, but it was close. 

Wagner and Peele thanked 
the crowd members (or sup- 
porting them and asked for 
their help in the coming week. 

"With only 17 votes separat- 
ing us from second place, we 
are going to have to push re- 
ally, really hard," said Wagner 
senior in information manage 
ment systems. 

"Ttell your friends to vote," 
said Peele, junior in secondary 



education "Get the word out." 

Crowd members supported 
the pair before and after the re- 
sults with cheers, including the 
K-S-U chant, mimicking the 
paii*» slogan, "KSYou." 

Wagner said he and Peele 
expected the race to be close, 
and they plan to campaign ag- 
gressively for the general elec- 
tions. 

"Seventeen is really close," 
Peele said. "1 would consider 
us being at square one." 

The two said their main 
goal is to show students they 
care, something they plan to 
start immediately 

"We are going lo campaign 
this very evening," Wagner 
said. 

Before the primaiy, Wag- 
ner and Peele spent $2,527.31. 
mainly on T-shirts, si^ and 
chalk Both said they probably 



will not spend much more 

"I don't think buying signs 
and more chalk will let stu 
dents know we care about 
them," Peele said 

"We have funds to work 
with, but our interests need to 
be talking to students, getting 
their feedback," Wagner said 

Wagner and Peele are run- 
ning on a three- pillar platform; 
academic accountability.study 
abroad fee elimination and a fi- 
nancial planning center. 

Academic accountability 
has two parts. The first would 
require professors to submit 
textbook orders the semes- 
ter before to allow students a 
chance to search for the b^ 
price. Hie second is to put a 
more structured policy in place 
for dead week, the week before 

SmWAGNERP^U 



Clinton to speak after long-time efforts to bring liim to K-State 



' •', ByAdriann«[>*Wt«M 

MNSASStATECOiLEGIAN 

Porrner US president Bill Clinton 
win not receive an honorarium, a fee 
for services rendered by a profession- 
al, for his Land on Lecture Friday 

Charles Reagan, chair of the Land 
on Lecture Series, said universities 
typically cannot afford lecture costs. 

It will cost K-State about $25,000 
to set up Bramlage and about $24,000 
in shared chartered jet costs to bring 
Clinton to K-State, Reagan said 



Clinton reportedly has made more 
than $40 million since 2001 deliver- 
ing speeches, according to a Feb. 22 
Washington Post article 

In 2006, Clinton made between 
$9 and $10 million in 352 lectures 
for the year About 20 percent of his 
speeches were for personal income, 
and (he others were given for no fee 
or for donations to the William |. 
Clinton Foundation, according to the 
Post article 

Gov. Kathleen Sebelius was a key 
player in bringing Clinton to K-State, 



Reagan said. University officials have 
known for about six weeks that Clin- 
ton would present the lecture. 

Clinton also will present the key- 
note address Friday night at the 
Kansas Democratic Party's annual 
Washington Days celebration Past 
speakers at Washington Days include 
Sen Barack Obama, D-lll, retired 
Gen Wesley Clark and former Sen 
John Edwards, D N.C. 

The event is open to the public 
and weekend tickets were available 
for $125, said Jenny Davidson, com- 



mimications director for the Kansas 
Democratic Party While she was un- 
able to provide exact dollar amounts, 
Davidson said the party is expecting 
typical expenses involved with bring- 
ing a president to Washington Days 

"We make it a habit at the party to 
invite prestigious Democratic speak 
ers, but we don't have specific rea- 
sons for asking speakers each year," 
Davidson said "We have a tradition 
of bringing prestigious speakers, so 
we like to continue that" 

According to the Post article, Clin- 



ton receives thousands of speaking 
requests each year and accepts only 
a few hundred Since 1993, K-State 
has sent at least one invitation a year 
to Clinton's administration. Reagan 
said 

"We never give up," Reagan said 
Originally, Clinton was sched- 
uled to present an evening Landon 
Lecture in either 1997 or 1998 after 
an appearance in Wichita, Reagan 
said. However, Former Sen Nancy 

Sm CLINTON Piqt 10 



4t 



Today's forecast 

Morning showers 
Hi9h:j9 Low: 28 



INSIDE 



Rejd the fourth inslallmeni of the KStlte based 
ttiy«My'E»rb<j(l Evirbjr login C, Mims. The 
fKiantl story follows kk% is he begins to notke 
othn stiKJentson campus acting strangely. 

SMStaryPagtl 



CAMPUS NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 



Event to explain 
fair trade movement 

The Fair Trade Social will take 
place from 6 to 8 p.m today in 
the Equine M«JKal Center, 1021 
Denison Students and faculty can 
learn about the fair trade move- 
ment and tow to browse the 
market place. The co owners of 
Iwo Hands World Shop* will give 
the presentation. 



Entrepreneur ^ir 
to display area work 

The Entrepreneur 5 Product Fair 
will display products created by 
area entrepreneurs from ?'.30 
a.m. to 12:}0 p.nv. today In the 
K-State Student Union Courtyard 
Eihibrtors will discuss the process 
of securing iniellKtual property, 
developing products and market- 
ing new products. 



Speaker to address 
effect of uprising 

Onesimo Hidalgo of the Center for 
Economic and Political Research In 
Chiapas, Mexico will present 'The 
Politics of Migration After the 1994 
EZIN Upming and the Ofigomg 
EftKts of NAFTA on the People of 
Chiapas,' at 2:30 p m today in the 
Big 12 Room of the K-Sute Studem 
Unwn. 



flahif naitiAC I The Social Security Administration recently 
Dduy lldm» [ thHisi of mon popular t»by names frory 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Thureday, March 1,2007 



^ofUn, JfooAk aiui fii^Zu 



mi Ottttin M 
www. ciattintiook3.com 



k 



1785) 77^3771 
Fax: (785) 776-1009 



Puzzles I Eugene Sheffer 



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QUIZZES 



Test your knowledge of trivia, entertainment and yourself 

The truth: Hollywood's hottest religions 



By Stephanie GorgM 

KANSAUMIECOlLEGtAN 

Celebrities from Madonna to Tbm Cruise 
have made otherwise little-known world re- 
ligions TasKionable and exotic in the United 
States. 

Unfortunately, the reputations and under- 
standing of many religions have been tainted 
by celebs' bad behavior and superficial knowl- 
edge. 

Can you distinguish between these religions' 
true tenets and their Hollywood portrayals? 

1. F«r many years, Madonna was the celeb- 
rtty face of Kabbalah. Celebrities like Britney 
Spears, Ashton Kutcher and Demi Moore still 
practice the religion, a mystical school of 
thought based on which world religion? 



A. 


Buddhism 


B. 


Hinduism 


C. 


Judaism 


D. 


Tioism 




HIiMtrMlon by I 



2. Richard Gere brought Tibetan Buddhism to 
popular culture. Which is not one of the four 
schools of Tibetan Buddhism? 

A. Nyingma (The imient ones) 

B. Kagyij (Saoed word) 

C. S*li)fa((jrey*arth) 

D. Dan tien {Center line) 

3. Stars from Tom Cruise to lenna Elfman to 
Beck practice Scientology. According to 'the 
study of truth," which is not a part of every 
human? 



A. 
t 

t 

D. 



L. Ron Hubbard 
Ted Haggard 
Hebe r Jentnth 
David Mfuavige 



Mind 
HtiTt 

Theian (spirit) 
Body 



3-1 CRYPTOQUIP 

US EOR ULYPOJJ YOU SOKULB 

OL O QRUJTULB DUPM 

YGIAQGTE AJYA. KGRJT 

E G R Q A Y U T U L B DUPM M L I ? 
Yeslcrday'i Cryptoqulp: WHEN YOUR WOODEN 
SHIPPING CASFIS QlilTE LOW IN QUALITY, YOU 
MIGHT CLAIM IT'S SECOND-CRATE 

Today's Cryptoquip Clue: R equaK U 



4. The founder of Sdentology also aeated the 
practice of Dianetics — what the soul does to 
the body through the mind. Who is the founder 
of both of these schools of thought? 



S. Vedism, practiced by celebrttles like Mia Far- 
row, Elizabeth Taylor and Calvin Klein, Is based 
on four Vedas, books claimed to be the oldest 
SCTiptures in the world. Vedism was the prede- 
cessor to which principal world religion? 

A. Buddhism 

B. Hinduism 

C. Judaism 

D. Taoism 

0-1 comet: Try not to bas« )rour opinions of woild religioiis on 
what Britney Spean has to say. Do some research on your own 
to 9a in deeper understanding 

2-4 COrTKt: You know the basks of Hollywood's en -vogue 
religions Now try expanding your knowledge to religions that 
have not made Holly vtood headlmes in the last year. 

S comet: You obviously have put some time Into religious 
studies. Congratulations on having an open mind toward 
teli^n. 

*-S-'»-»!H!pia-i: 



ByDonnieLec 



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Bi WEAKWfe A PRtSS oR 

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CU1TWIN&... 

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Wl'Rt KXCKASfr/ 
1 



The planner 

Campus bulletin board 

To place an Item In the bnipus Calendar, 
stop by Kedzle 1 16 and fill out a tonn or e- 
mail tbe news edKor at ro/fe^mn^spuA.Jsu. 
«A/ by 1 T am two dajn btfbrt it is to mn. 

The blotter 

Arrests in Riley County 

The Collegian tak« reports dlredty from 
the Riley County Police Oepartment's dally 
logs. The Collegian does not list wheel locks 
or minor traffic violations because ol spue 
constraints. 

Tuesday, Feb. 27 

■ Itrttti Ralynn Wldtncr. Ogden, at 
8:1S a.fii. fot failure to appear. Bond was 
SS5J. 

■ Irbtophtr Jo« Ktrt«n4«ll, )020 
Houston St. Apt. 9, at 9:23 a.m. for driving 
with i suspended or cancelled license. 
Bond was $750. 

■ Staci Lynn CUnton, Ogden, at 9:40 
a.m. for worthless check. Bond was 
SJJ9.W. 

■ Antonio Circle Leonor, Ogden, at 
4:SS p.m. for failure to appear. Bond was 
SI.SOO. 

■ PihI JtlM SwttI, 421 N. 16th St. Apt 
1, at S;3S pm. for failure to appear. Bond 
was S4S. 

a Mark D. rrcticr, S70S Elbo Bluff 
Road, at 10:08 p.m. for disorderly con- 
duct. Bond vrts $750. 

■ Vernon Michael B«hi, 3S0$ Claflln 
Road, at 10:4S p.m. for disorderly con- 
duct Bond was $7S0. 



Corrections and 
clarifications 

Corrections and clarlftcatlons run in this 
space. If you see something that should be 
corrected, call news editor Me]( Peak at (785 i 
S32-6SS6 or e-mail alltgkin^ipubiksu.e(ki. 



Kansas State Collegian 

{USPS 291 020) The Kansas SUte Collegian, 
a student newspaper at Kansas State 
University, is published by Student Publica- 
tions Inc., Kedzle lOJ, Manhattan, KS 66S06. 
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O Kansas SUte Collegian, 2007 



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"Thursflay, March 1,2007 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 3 



K-State students attend black student government conference 



By HMthvr Hkktnon 

KAHiAS StAIKOll£(]IAN 

One might be a small itum- 
±ei, but people can bring 
change to themselves and their 
communities. 

"The Power of One" was the 
theme for the 30th Annual Big 
12 Conference on Black Stu 
dent Government at the Uni 
versity of Nebraska. 

"We can create change our- 
selves," said Akilah Mahon, 
president of K-State's Black 
Student Union and senior in 
business finance. "One person 
can change tilings, but one per- 
son can abo bring together and 
create unity in a community." 



Mahon said the confer- 
ence consisted of workshops, 
guest speakers, a career fair, 
enlertainm«it and an awards 
presentation. The workshops 
and guest speakers were edu- 
cational and motivational, and 
students also visited the ca 
reer and graduate /professional 
school fair. Mahon said nearly 
60 employers and graduate and 
professional schools attended 
the fair, 

K-State student AbdulKa- 
sak Yahaya, senior in civil en- 
gineering, is the 2006-07 chair 
of the Big 12 Council on Black 
Student Government. 

"I serve as the voice for Black 
Student Government and com- 



munities in the Big 12 regionr 
he said. "The council serves as 
a catalyst for our physical, in- 
tellectual and spiritual develop- 
ment, also as proactive support 
for the self evident right of all 
people for cultural expression 
and participation." 

Even though Yahaya works 
with all of the Big 12 universi- 
ties, he said he understands his 
role also benefits K-State spe- 
cifically 

"I represent K-State by uti- 
lizing the tools and ideas gen 
erated by the K State BSU 
and try to share strategies and 
implement positive change 
throughout the Big 12," he 
said 



Mahon said 23 K-State stu- 
dents attended the conference 
thb year, and had to pay or 
raise the money for the $110 
rcgbtration fee. 

Tb attend the conference, 
students had to participate in 
at least one BSU-sponsored 
fundraiser, attend dining eti- 
quette and resume building 
workshops and have at least a 
2.5 GPA. 

The conference was Feb, 
15-18 in Lincoln. Neb. Mahon 
emphasized the conference 
was open to Big 12 schools as 
well as other private and public 
universities in the Midwest re- 
gion. 

Brandon Clark, graduate 



student in college student per- 
sonnel and a conference advis- 
er to all schools in the Big 12. 
advises the black student gov- 
ernment members about how 
to host a conference. 

"It's very important for our 
students to go, because it gets 
our students off our campus," 
he said. "Il helps them lo net- 
work and gives our students 
ideas from other schools' pro 
grams that we can bring back 
and implement at K-State 

"Plus, the conference serves 
as a reward to students who are 
active in fundraising and events 
that BSU puts on. It recharges 
their battery and gives them 
fresh ideas • 



K-State did not win any 
awards at the conference this 
year, but did win Most Out- 
standing Council in the Big 12 
in 2006 

"Winning most outstanding 
council showed our hard work 
paid ofi, that we were doing 
something people were recep 
tivc of," Mahon said. 

Students are busy all year 
planning events, organizing 
activities and arranging fund- 
raisers Clark said the confer- 
ence allows studeiits to get re- 
charged, refreshed and ready to 
tackle the rest of the year 

Mahon said going to the Big 
12 conference was a rewarding 
experience. 



Male, female students donate hair to Locks of Love, help cancer patients 



ByKrMinhiodgM 

KANSAS STATKOLLtGlltN 

Dave HoSman's long trusses 

are a new look for him. His hair 
has been relatively short his 
.entire life, and the decision to 
^w it out went beyond style 
appeal. 

Hoffman, sophomore in 
mass communications, decided 
to grow out his hair to donate 
it lo the Locks of Love organi- 
zation after a family friend was 
diagnosed with cancer. 

He said he has not cut his 
"hair since November 2005, 

"It's given me a new perspec- 
tive and a way to look different," 
HoSman said 

According to the Locks of 
L,ove Web site, wumdockso- 
flove.org, the organization "pro 
vides hairpieces to financially 
disadvantaged children under 
age Its suffering from long-term 
medical hair loss from any diag- 
nosis." 

The organization asks for at 
least lOinches of hair The mini- 
mum length is required because 
most recipients are females. 
jnany o( whom prefer long hair. 

Because there multiple 



lengths within each ponytail, it 
takes six lo 10 donated pony- 
tails to make one hairpiece 

Through the organization. 
children receive hairpieces free 
ol charge According to the site, 
if a family had to purchase a 
hairpiece, it would cost at least 
$3,500 

According to the site, anyime 
can cut hair as a donation to the 
organization. 

Brenda Kowe, stylist at 
Great Clips, 100 E. Bluemont 
Ave., said the salon is registered 
with the Locks of Love organi- 
zation. 

She saAd the salon provides 
haircuts free of charge when a 
customer comes in to donate 
his or her hair lo the organiza 
tion. although there are require 
ments for the hair donated, 

"It has to be virgin hair," she 
said. "It can't be color-treated 
or chemically processed," 

Hoffman said he first heard 
about the program through a 
high -school friend who donated 
her hair several times. He said 
he has known people who have 
gone through cancer treatments 
and lost full heads of hair. All 
four of his grandparents have 



died from some type of cancer 

"It's a really good program 
that's real easy to do," he said, "I 
fully support anyone that does 
it, male or female." 

He said this is the longest his 
hair has ever been, and he plans 
to cut and donate his hair the 
first day of spring break, 

'Having long hair is quite a 
burden," he said 

Hoffman said his new 'do 
hasn't kept him from doing any- 
thing he did when he had short 
hair, but he does have to wear a 
headband to play sports. 

Long hair has taught him the 
effort it takes to maintain a lon- 
ger mane, he said. 

Hoffman's friends and family 
have been supportive of his de- 
cision and told him it is a noble 
cause, he said, althougli people 
sometimes remind him of what 
he looked like with short hair. 

He supports the cause, but 
said be doesn't see himscll 
growing out his hair again, be- 
cause he will want lo keep a 
professional look when enter- 
ing the workplace 

Kendra Murry. freshman in 
horticulture, donated her hair 
in fall 2005 after growing it out 



Strike a 




• If 





these 

k-staters 

did 



We'll be in AggieviUe Thursday, March 1 , 

9:00 - 1 1 :00 p.m. under Varney's marquee 

and Saturday, March 3 at Bramlage 

for the Oklahom game. 

So bring your friends and strike a pose! 

It's free and the best shots will 
be in the 2007 Royal Puiple yearbook. 



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Otrina RMinan | COllEOIAN 

Oav* Hoffman, sophomore in mass communlcattons, has not cut his hair since November 2CIC5, 
Hoffman decided to grow out his hair to donate to the Locks of Love organization after a family friend 
was diagnosed with cancer. 

lo her waist when her hairstylbl 
cut 10 inches off to donate 

Although il was hard to lose 
10 inches of her hair. Murry 
said she would do it again 



for five years. 

'! heard about it on 'Oprah.'" 
she said, "So 1 thought Why not 
just donate to a good cause?'" 

She said her hair was down 



"I don't think it would be as 
traumatizing this time," she said. 
"In lact. I'm growing out my 
hair again. I'll probably get sick 
of it, cut il and donate il again. 



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■»».. — 



OPINION 



Page 4 



KANSAS STATi COLLEGIAN 



Thursday, March 1, 2007 




MEGAN 
MOLITOR 



*Proof ' of Jesus' 
existence negates 
purpose of faith 

All you doubting Thomases out 
there had better re-evaluate your way 
of thirvking. Hollywood bigwigs have 
done the unthink- 
able: proven the 
existence of Jesus 
Christ. 

Or have they? 

A documentary 
set to air March 4 
on the Discovery 
Channel claims 
10 small caskets 
found in Jerusalem 
held the bonra of 

Jesus and his family according to Pox 
News. 

Tlie documentary is produced by 
James Cameron and directed by Sim- 
cha Jacobovici, who said the fact that 
one of the containers bears the name 
of Mary Magdalene is proof this is the 
real deal. Good Lord. 

1 grew up a good Lutheran pil, 
and I'm all for making believers out of 
doubtere, but give me a break 

The very idea thai Jesus had a cas- 
ket, complete with bones, goes against 
the very belief of his resurrection and 
ascension into heaven. 

Most Christians believe Christ's 
three days in a tomb were spent in 
Jerusalem's Old City. The site in the 
documentary is nowhere near there. 

Still not convinced? 

These "findings" are not even 
recent - in fact, they were made in 
the '80s, but nobody cared enough to 
make any claims then. Only now that 
American filmmakers have simk their 
claws into the subj^ b aiiyone taking 
a second look at them. 

Many archaeologists dispute this 
discovery - even those who first 
found the remains. The first archae- 
ologist who examined the site, Amos 
Kloner, said it didn't come close to 
holding up to archaeological stan- 
dards. 

What 1 don't understand is why 
people are so hungry to prove the 
existence of Jesus and everything that 
goes along with him. Sure, proof pos- 
sibly could provide hope and comfort 
for millions of people, but lant that 
why it's called "faith"? 

This isn't a new thing. On almost 
every tabloid cover you can see im- 
ages of "real" sightings of Jesus, but 
in the end, isn't this just a cry for h^ 
from a world craving knowledge of 
what happens when you take your 
final breath? 

Faith and religion are not about 
artifacts or remains. Tliey are about 
pulling something out of your soul 
that nobody can touch, no matter 
what "proof exists to support or 
oppose them. That's why it's called a 
belief, not a fact 

About a decade ago, everyorw 
wore those "What would Jesus do?" 
bracelets The answer is, nobody 
knows, and that's the way it's sup- 
posed to be 



Mt9M MeVtH b I junlM In iwu cwnniunlcMlara. 
PImm ttn4 fMir («mm«nb ta opMMi^'tpu^-Jbu, 



I- LOLLEGIAN 



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CadrtqiK fl i wul i n I TIW) Mm 

[HMnUml 

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Cvurwry Vtrv | IDMINtuI 



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HluttraUon by JurriMl MtatH | COLLEGIAN 



The feminine critique 

Portrayals of activists as radical are inaccurate 




ROBIN 
NELSON 



On any given day last week, 
upon opening your Collegian, you 
likely noticed the f-word splashed 
across the in- 
side. 

No, not that 
f-word - the 
more controver- 
sial one Starting 
with an in- 
nocent enough 
opinion column 
about the new, 
female president 
of Harvard, 

feminism suddenly became the 
center of a heated debate. 

People wrote letters cither to de- 
fend feminism or snort at it, and as 
b inevitable when this word crops 
up, broad generalizations and wild 
faiBCcuracies were tossed around 
and paraded as fact 

I will not pretend 1 know every- 
thing about feminism Even with 
two women's itudiet classes under 
my belt and one more in progren, 1 
do not claim lo be an expert on this 
multi-faceted topic. But I do know 
the radical, man-hating, razor-shun- 
ning feminist stereotype exists sokly 
in the minds of the ignorant. 

feminists are not some oversen- 
sitive, fanatical group who believe a 
set of uniform and unyielding ideas. 
Feminism constantly is evolving, 
and it is a word that encompasses 
a vast amount of people and a diz- 



zying array of ideas. lb lump all of 
them together does the movement a 
great disservice. 

Let us take Christianity as an 
example. Claiming all Christians 
are the same obviously is inaccu- 
rate and unfair. There are a wide 
variety of beliek to be found within 
this one concept. While they share 
a name, there are many diverse 
practices, levels of adherence and 
interpretation of experiences to be 
found in Christianity. 

Just as it would be ridiculous to 
mistake all Christians for religious 
zealots, it is likewise a mistake to 
toss ail feminists in with the most 
extreme members of their group. 

The women's studies classes 
I have taken at K-Slate do not 
promote blind hatred and pettiness, 
as critics would have you believe. In 
fad, all have made repeated refer- 
ences to the huge steps this country 
already has taken towards equality 

But neither are they content to 
teach students of past successes to 
encourage our complacency. They 
push us to constantly question 
gender roles, personal identity and 
accepted norms. My classes did not 
tell students our society is inher- 
ently wrong, but demanded we not 
assume it is inherently right Since 
when are skepticism and critical 
thinking radical ideas? 

Contrary to popular beliel, not 
bU feminism is concerned solely 



with women. In the Department of 
Women's Studies, an emphasis is 
placed on the equal treatment of all 
people. Students learn about issues 
typically linked lo feminism like 
rights tor the disabled, welfare and 
ending racism. There also much 
time spent educating students about 
the gay and transgendered commu- 
nities 

I am continually saddened to 
see such ignorance and disdain di- 
rected toward feminism. As with all 
movements that encourage people 
to question societal norms, there 
has been much opposition to the 
thoughts feminism puts forth for us 
to consider. I wonder why so many 
people seem too threatened to look 
into feminism and reflect on what 
the movement is trying to say. You 
certainty do not have to agree with 
everything a feminist argues, but 
listen to the overall message and 
select which points you think are 
valid. 

That is the whole point - to 
question and come up with your 
own opinion. But please, stop 
portraying feminists as dbsatisfied 
housewives and angry zealots ~ it 
vastly underestimates us, and makes 
you look hopelessly ignorant. 



Robin Ntlfon Is I J«Hiliir in OMtittt wrWnf 
Md ttlintun. Mmw Mnd your UMMiKfits to 



TO THE POINT 



An editorial selected and debated by the editorial board and written after a majority opinion 
Is formed. This is the Collegian's official opinion. 



Financial gifts not only way to help those in need 



Albert Emstein once said, 
"It is every man's obligation 
to put back into the world 
at least the equivalent of 
what he takes out of it." 

We are blessed, not only 
Bnancially, but with gifts 
and abilities. Einstein com- 
pels us to return a portion 
of what we receive back to 
the common good. 

In other words, give 
back. But to what? 

Several charitable events 
are happening around the 
K-State campus - every- 
thing from the American 
Cancer Society's Relay for 
Life to fundraisers for the 
"Invisible Children" docu- 
mentary. 

But a constant onslaught 
of fundraisers, bake sales 
and door-to-door-knocking 



ventures might have made 
some people wary to give 
financially to organizations. 
Some people are zealous 
for one particular cause and 
pour all of their resources 
into that venture. Other 
people cannot afford to 
financially give to a cause, 
no matter how honorable it 
is. 

A host of nonprofit and 
charitable organizations 
exist, eager to find ways to 
gamer support among the 
public. And though you 
might feel guilty for having 
to say no to the kind voice 
asking over the phone for 
a chunk of your paycheck, 
there are other ways to 
give. 

Organizations constantly 
look for volunteers - peo- 



ple willing to sacrifice their 
time and abilities for any 
amount of time. Although 
your pocketbook might not 
be bursting with bucks, you 
can offer a few hours of the 
week to help. 

The ways to give are 
endless. Some people have 
found other options to give, 
including the Locks of Love 
organization's work to col- 
lect donated hair to make 
wigs for cancer patients. 

Think of new ways to 
give back. Refrain from 
your coffee vice for a week 
and donate the money to a 
local charity. Have a yard 
sale and give the proceeds 
to someone in need. Take 
time to think of how you 
can put something back 
into the world. 



U-COLUMNS 

"Hie best opinion columns from 
campus newspapers across the nation 

Wikipedia 

doesn't get 

enough respect 

staff Editorial » 

OWLY FORI* NINf R ItAL STHt-lONG BtACH) ^ 

Among the many under-appreci- 
ated and misunderstood resources • 
in our world, Wikipedia.com ranks 
high on the list. 

It is abused by college students, :, 
damned by professors and generally 
shunned among the 30-and-older , 
intellectual crowd. Now, according" 
to an article in the Feb. 21 issue of-^ 
The New York Times, it has been 
banned altogether from a history : 
department at Middlebury Col- 
lege in Vermont, This move, while , 
shocking, is disappointing for the . 
wrong reasons - students should > 
never use this Web site as their sole' 
source. 

It is a bit embarrassing that col- ' 
lege students would even dare to 
use Wikipedia as their only source.^ 
For those readers who are not yet 
up to speed on the hotly debated ,. 
Web site, Wikipedia is an online . 
voluntary encyclopedia that allows ' 
readers to submit their own entries^ 
and alter others, usually without 
restriction. The "voluntary" aspect : 
is what doesn't jibe with many aca-,. 
demies who believe the openness .; 
of Wikipedia can cause incorrect . . 
information lo seep into the site. ■ 
corrupting its validity. 

In the case of Middlebury Col- 
lege, the misinformation already ; 
has infiltrated the Web site and, ■ 
consequentially, students' papers. ' 
According to the article, six stu- Z 
dents allowed an egregious histori * 
cal error into their papere by using- 
Wikipedia for their papers on the • 
Shimabara Rebellion of 17th-cen- • 

• 

tury japan i 

The mistake these students mad^ 
was not their use of the Web site, J 
but that they used it as their only '. 
source. Wikipedia is a fantastic re- 1 
source for primary information an(£ 
a great starting place for research. • 

If users need a brief overview of« 
an issue, they often can find it on ; 
Wikipedia and get a very basic and; 
superficial understanding of a topic; 
which can help when doing further; 
research. Some entries, however. I 
go into greater detail than some * 
Wikipedia skeptics might give then* 
credit for. • 

Also, many of Wikipedia's 
entries are sourced from other, ^ 
incredibly useful links to credible t 
Web sites that could be used in 
essays as valid sources. Some even*, 
copy information from reliable 
sources and paste it onto Wikipe- ' 
dia pages Both Wikipedia's fatal ' 
flaw and its charm are rooted in ' 
the same characteristic: the ease 
with which readers can change the 
content of the Web site. 

According to a July 3 1 , 2006, . 
article in The New Yorker, Wiki 
pedia's millionth entry was one 
sentence on Jordanhill, an obscure 
train station in Glasgow. Scotland. 
According to the article, within 24; 
hours, the entry was edited more 
than 400 times by dozens of peopk 
who knew obscure information, - 
tike the fact fordanhill train station- 
is the "1.029th busiest train station 
in the United Kingdom " and that 
it "no longer has a staffed ticket 
counter" 

One aspect of Wikipedia that 
might be hard to change is that cer- 
tain subjects are not well-known, 
and people with expertise prob- 
ably aren't devoting much time to 
updating a Wikipedia entry, as was 
the case with Middlebury College 
and 17th century Japanese history. ', 

But, according to the entry on ', 
Wikipedia, "An investigation by ' 
Nature (a scholarly journal) com- j 
pared Wikipedia to the Encyclo- ; 
paedia Britannica and suggested a ; 
similar level of accuracy." 

The only solution to the poor ed- 
iting and lack of content for which 
Wikipedia is criticized is for more 
people to use it. The more people 
use the Web site, the more people 
may feel compelled lo improve its 
content and coverage of an issue. 



Thursday, March 1,2007 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Pages 



WORLD NEWS 




IRAQANNOUNaS 
SECURITY MEETING 
WtTH IRAN, SYRIA, U.S. 

BAGHDAD, Iraq - Iraq* 
neighbors, including Iran 
and Syria, agreed to join U.S. 
and British representatives to 
discuss the Iraqi security c li- 
sts at a regional conference 
Marth 10 in Baghdad, the 
government said Wednes- 
day. 

Iraqi Foreign Minister 
Hoshyar Zebari said he soon 
will be issuing formal invi- 
tations to the neighboring 
countries and the five perma 
nent U.N. Security Council 
members - the U.S., Britain, 
Prance, Russia and China - 
to send deputy foreign minis- 
ters or senior officials to the 
conference. 

Zebari, in a telephone in- 
terview with The Associated 
Press from Sweden, said the 
Iranians agreed to partici- 
pate in a meeting with the 
other neighbors but "they 
have some questions" about 
a separate session that would 
be held the same day with 
the five permanent council 
members. 



PRESCRIPTION DRUG 
ABUSE WILL SOON EXCEED 
USE OF ILLICIT NARCOTICS 

VIENNA, Austria - Abuse 
of prescription drugs b about 
to exceed the use of illicit street 
narcotics worldwide, and the 
shift has spawned a lethal new 
trade in counterfeit painklUers, 
sedatives and other medicines 
potent enough to kill, a global 
watchdog warned Wednesday. 

Prescription drug abuse 
already has outstripped tra- 
ditional illegal drugs such as 
heroin, cocaine and Ecstasy 
in parts of Europe. Africa and 
South Asia, the UN. -affiliated 
International Narcotics Con- 
trol Board said in its annual 
report for 2006. 

In the United Slates alone, 
the abuse of painkillers, stimu 
lants. tranquilizers and other 
prescription medications has 
surpassed "practically all illicit 
drugs with the exception of 
cannabis," with users increas- 
ingly turning to them first, the 
Vienna -based group said. 

Up to 50 percent of all drugs 
taken in developing countries 
are believed to be counterfeit, 
the board said. 



AIRBUSTO SHED 10,000 
JOBS, SELL PLANTS IN BID 
TO HALT SLIDE 

PARIS - Airbus, steadily 
losing its market lead to Boe- 
ing Co., unveiled drastic plans 
Wednesday to follow in its 
US. rival's footsteps by cutting 
thousands of jobs, selling off 
manufacturing sites and out- 
sourcing more work. 

Strikes and protests greeted 
the European planemaker's 
long-awaited announcement 
that it intends to shed 10,000 
staff and sell, close or spin off 
six plants as it struggles to sur> 
vive the crippling fallout from 
a two-year delay to its A380 
superjumbo and the wraker 
US. dollar 

"Wc are doing what other 
companies have done, but 
we're a bit late," Airbus Chief 
Executive Louis Gallois said 
as he presented the 'PowerS" 
restructuring strategy 

Company representatives 
said they will seek to avoid 
layofb by using voluntary 
schemes such as early retire- 
ment, but made no promises. 

— The Auedited Picu 



Inspection decreases could be 
responsible for outbreaks 



By Allison VorU 

KANSAS STATE COlltGIAN 

The very agency on which 
the public has relied for infor- 
mation about contaminated 
foods like peanut butter and 
spinach might be at fault for 
not preventing outbreaks, ac- 
cording to research conduct- 
ed by The Associated Press 

The Food and Drug Ad- 
ministration decreased the 
number of food safety inspec- 
tions by almost 50 percent 
since 2003. The number of 
safety tests for U.S. -produced 
food dropped by nearly 75 
percent. 

Doug Powell, associate 
professor in diagnostic medi- 
cine and pathobiology, said 
people should not focus on 
the FDA in this situation but 
on industry standards and 
where foods go before they 
reach the marketplace. 

"The government sets a 
minimal standard, and the 
industry itself will set a much 



higher standard," Powell said. 
"It's up to the farmers and 
processors to provide a safe 
product" 

The safety level of foods 
would not increase if the 
FDA increased inspections, 
Powell said To make foods as 
safe as possible, the culture 
in processing plants and on 
farms needs to change so that 
all employees practice safe 
food handling, like washing 
their hands after using the re 
stroom, he said. 

When a problem arises, 
like the recent issue with 
salmonella-contaminated 
peanut butter, the FDA will 
inspect the processing plant 
to find how the food became 
contaminated 

"It's like 'CSI,*" Powell 
said. "They try to uncover 
how this happened" 

The peanut butler contam- 
ination resulted in a recall of 
Peter Pan and Great Value 
peanut butter. 

Roy Hullet, store manager 



at Wal-Mart in Manhattan, 
said people have returned re- 
called peanut butter to Wal- 
Mart, but the recall has not 
stopped customers from pur- 
chasing peanut butter. 

"I've noticed the other 
brands of peanut butter have 
been selling, maybe even more 
than usual," Hulett said. 

Lindsey Friesen, junior in 
electronic journalism, pur 
chased recalled peanut butter 
and returned it to the grocery 
store where she bought it in 
Newton, Kan 

"1 figured I better not take 
any chances," Friesen said "I 
took it back just to be safe." 

Although it might seem 
like food contamination has 
been everywhere recently, it 
should not be something to 
worry too much about, Pow- 
ell said. 

"The people producing 
this food have no interest in 
making their customers sick," 
Powell said "It's bad for busi- 
ness." 




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Page 6 



SPORTS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Rock bottom 



5th-straight loss puts Wildcats 
danger of finishing last in Big 12 

Bw Davna Ummh OSU lunior Danielle Green led ■! 



By Dmyn* Logan 

KANSAS STATKOLLEGIAN 

The K-State women'i basketball 
team closed out the regular season 
with a 64-55 loss to Oklahoma State 
Wednesday night at Bramlage Coli- 
seum. 

Despite coming into the game in 
completely different situations, both 
K-Slate (16-13. 4-12 Big 12 Confer- 
ence) and OSU (20-9, 8-8) had a lot 
to play for. A win for the Cowgirls 
would bring them one step closer to 
an NCAA tournament berth, while 
the Wildcats were fighting to ensure 
they stayed out of last place in the Big 
12. 

"Three games ago. we were 5-8 
(in the Big 12) and we went into the 
locker room and said. We can go win 
these three games,'" OSU coach Kurt 
Budke said. "We believed in our team 
We believed we could get it done, and 
now three games later here we are at 
500, and we feel like we belong in the 
NCAA loumament " 

K-State started the game with a 
bombardment of 3-point attempts, 
and despite making just 2 of-6 in the 
opening four minutes, was able to es- 
tablish an 8-4 lead 

Cowgirl sophomore Taylor Har- 
deman answered a few minutes later 
with back-to-back 3-pointers and gave 
her (cam a 14-13 advantage with 12:37 
remaining. OSU never looked back. 

The Cowgirls shot 48 percent frtjm 
the field, while the Wildcats con- 
nected on 2-of-8 free throws to allow 
Oklahoma State to extend its lead to 
35-27 by halftime, 



OSU junior Danielle Green led til 
•corers with 14 poinu in the first half, 
while her teammate, freshman Andrea 
Riley, contributed 1 1 of her own. ju- 
nior Kimberly Dietz led K-State with 
10. 

The Wildcats continued to struggle 
in the second half, and by the time the 
12-minute mark rolled around, they 
had managed |ust two held goats K- 
State's offensive impotence allowed 
the Cowgirls to take their first double- 
digit lead of the game, 

Midway through the half, the 
Wildcats' frustration became appar- 
ent when refs charged both Riley and 
sophomore Danielle Zanotti with 
technical fouls 

The technicals fired up the crowd 
but did little to inspire the Wildcats' 
play, Oklahoma State put the game on 
cruise control and coasted to a com- 
fortable victory. 

Green Wished with 24 points for 
the Cowgirls, while Dietz was the only 
K-State player in double figures with 
23 

"1 felt that as a basketball team we 
didn't bring Ihe quality of competitive 
intensity you need to bring in the Big 
12," coach Deb Patterson said "They 
didn't bring that tonight, and that was 
a maior disappointment to each and 
every one of us," 

Barring a win by Kansas Thursday 
ni^U. KSiate will meet OSU agam 
March 6 in the first round of the Big 
12 Tournament in Oklahoma CiQ' 

"1 can't wait for the Big 12 Tourna 
mcnt," senior Claire Coggins said "1 
don't think that we are anywhere near 
the (point) of giving up." 




atrinallninon I COLLEGIAN 

K-Stat* sanlor Clairt Co^glns covers her Face during the Wildcats' 64-55 loss to 
Oklahoma State. Coggins finished hei last game of the regular season as a Wildcat 
with 6 points, 5 assists and 3 rebounds. She could play her last game as a Wildcat 
Tuesday in the first round of the Big 12 Conference Tournament in Oklahoma City. 



Prochazkova overcomes injury, steps in wfien needed 



ByWandyHtun 

KAIfSAS STATE COUEGIAN 

When it came to selecting a college, 
junior Tereza Prochazko\^ weighed 
several options, but a friend's choice to 
join the K- State women's tennis team 
convinced Prochazkova to follow her. 

"Olga (Klimova) had already signed 
here so we could come here and be to- 
gether," Prochazkova said. 

Both players are from Brno, Czech 
Republic, .\lthough the>' attended dif- 
ferent schools, they were friends and 
competed agairist each other on the 



tennis court, Klimova said. 

"We've been friends for a long time," 
she said. 'Even when we competed 
against each other, we were still biends 
When we came here, it helped both of 
us, because we knew somebody here." 

Prochazkova and Klimova's stories 
are similar After signmg with K-State, 
Prochazkova tore her anterior cruciate 
ligament in |uly 2004 and needed sur- 
gery and rehabilitation. 

Shortly after Prochazkova complet- 
ed rehab, Klimova tore her ACL and 
had to undergo the same treatment. 

"It was nice having her here, be- 




ll (Oueoan 

T«r*za Prochaikova tor* her anterior cruciate ttgarrvent during her freshman season 
at KState. In October, she injured the same kne«. but she returned to play last 
weekend to prevent K-State from forfeiting two matches. 



cause I was far from my family, and 
I needed someone to support me and 
help me out," Klimova said. "I needed 
someone to do basic stuff for mc, and 
she was always there for me" 

Prochazkova said she enjoys play- 
ing tennis and furthering her education 
at K-State. 

"1 like the opportunity to get a great 
educalion." she said. "I'm glad that I'm 
here with great teammates and that we 
like each other" 

Last weekend. K-State played with- 
out junior Tamar Kvaratskhelia and 
sophomore Maria l\'revoshchikova. 
The team suddenly was fated with the 
possibility of forfciling one singles and 
one doubles match. 

Prochazkova aggravated the same 
knee that was injured her freshman 
season in October. She was medically 
cleared for the matches on Saturday 
and Sunday, which prevented K-Statc 
from forfeiting any of its matches. 

"I didn't want us to forfeit the 
matches, because then the girls would 
be al a disadvantage." she said. "I also 
wanted to start playing and gel the 
chance lo win" 

Losing her firs! semc-ster to injury 
was crucial, coach Steve Bictau said. 

"That's really the time when you 
Icani the most," he said. "Everything's 
new, and inissmg that just puts you 
back." 



In the two years since her first inju- 
ry, Bietau said Prochazkova has come 
a long way, on and off (he court 

"This fall when she came back, we 
fell like the maturity was there, and she 
understood how she needed to work," 
he said. "She knew how she needed 
to practice to become a better player. 
She was also healthy so she really had 
a good semester of work " 

Last weekend, Prochazkova's par- 
ents traveled from the Czech Republic 
to scT her play in Albuquerque, N.M. 

She and freshman Natasha Vicira 
won in doubles (8-3) to secure the 
doubles point for K- St ate 

'Both of my parents traveled with 
me in the Czech Republic when I went 
to tournaments in high school," she 
said. "My dad loves tennis more than 
anything, and he loves watching me 
play He likes coaching me and giving 
me advice, and that they could be there 
and see me play was amazing" 

Prochazkova is just glad to be back 
after missing the first pan of tlie dual 
season and the end of the fall season. 

"ll was sad for me. and I lost mo- 
tivation for awhile, because the rehab 
is so boring compared to training," she 
said 

"The fact that 1 could play lait 
weekend and play well was just a great 
feeling It was my call, and 1 was cagpr 
to try. and it worked." 



Kansas college teams bOast strange, meaningful mascots 



Kansas is known for its farming 
and 'The Wizard of Oz." but one thing 
that slips under the radar might be 
Kansas universities' 
odd and sometimes 
ridiculous mascots. 

TUce, for ex- 
ample, the Wichita 
State Shockers 

The symbolism 
of shocking wheat 
makes sense - what 
else do ihey do 
down there? - but 
one look at the actual mascot on the 
sidelines could frighten babies and 
make people lough at the same time. 

The Shocker mascot, known at 
Wu-Shock, is clasaificd on the Wichita 
Stale Web «te as a big. bad, muscle 




SCOTT 
GIftARD 



bound bundle of wheat " The Wu part 
of its name comes from when the uni- 
versity was named Wichita Univerei^ 
(orWU). 

It's a neat idea and tradition, but I 
hardly ever imagine a bundle of wheat 
wearing black clothing, shoes and 
having a "muscle -bound" physique 

Maybe the most interesting mascot 
in Kansas is the Washburn Ichabod 

The name "Ichabod " came from 
the flnt name of one of the univer- 
sity's earliest benefactors, Ichabod 
Washburn. The mascot, a stately man 
dressed in early 1900s attire, is the 
antithesis of a college student. The fol- 
lowing paragraph is an excerpt from 
the 1938 Washburn yearbook, when 
the university adopted the Ichabc^ 
insula 



"He has courage and enthusiasm 
as shown by his brisk walk. He a 
democratic and courteous, for he tips 
his hat as he passes Sincere in his 
search for truth and knowledge, he 
studiously carries a cxik under his 
arm. His friendly smile makes you like 
him He's neatly dressed and he fits 
well into his generation, but adapts 
himself with equal ease to any change 
or age" 

If that's not an intimidating mascot, 
I don't know what is 

Next on the list is the Kansas 
Jayhawk. On the surface, the jayhawk 
seems normal: the bird has been a 
staple al KU since the early 1900s 

TUcing a closer look though, one 
should wonder how i symbol for free- 
state tovcrei^ty turned into a giant 



blue-and-red bird that resembles Big 
Bird more than the free-staters of the 
Civil War era 

The Jayhawk, according to Law- 
rence Journal-World, is a combination 
of the blue jay, known for ils loud, 
quarrelsome behavior, and the spar- 
row hawk, a stealthy hunter 

The idea and the tradition are 
solid It's a part of history that should 
be remembered |ust not as an enor- 
mous Sesame Slreel- loo king character 
clad in giant shoes and a KU jers^ 

Now I could nol write a mascot 
column without mentioning Willie the 
Wildcat. Don't gel me wrong, he ^ts 
the crowd excited and brings women 
to athletic events who might not have 

SttlUAKOTSPagria 




MeCullough 



Thursday, March 1, 2007 

1-MINUTE 
DRILL 

Staff Reports 

BKWj K-StittplKffs6on 
Acadtrnk Atl-6)g 12 Team 

Die K-Stite wmwn^ bastottMH teim 
placed sJx playHs cm the M7 kiimk M- 
Blg 1 2 ConfHHKe Wornen's iiskK<bii\ Itm, 
tlM lugue offki 
announced WMn«d«y. 
K-StMMttMconk- 
tfwe,w(tlithenwn 
selcctkxis to the squad. 

Juntos Carolyn 
McCuMoughandShana 
Wti«lefar>dioph(h 
rriMK Mail lei Gpson, 
ShalK Lehntng ind 
Dartielk Zanotti vnn 
narrwd to the flrrt team 
wMI« junior Kimberly Dietz was selected to dw 
second team. 

Nominated by each instltuiM dlredEr 
of student-athlete support services and the 
media rtlattons oflkes, the aodemk all-league 
womeiiibasJietbdll squad coniisted of 33 
flRt-t*am mwnbw corrtiin*d with 1 3 on the 
setond teim. First team members are tfra* 
who miMilMd a 3 J GPA 01 better, and the 
setond tNm i*e Ihose who have a 3.0 to J.19 
QPk. 

To be eligtble, student-athletes must 
maintain a 3.0 6PA or higher in either cumula- 
tive w the two previous semesters and rrtust 
have participated in 60 percent of scheduled 
team contesb. Freshmen arvd transfers m not 
ellg^ in their fii^t year of academic tnideiKe. 
Swiiof student athletes who have parttc^iited 
for A minimum of two years and meet all the 
Gitena except percent of particlpatkif^ m abo 
eligible. 

UcOjIlough, along with Ashley Paris 
(Oklahonu), Chebi Wekh lOdahoma) artd 
Brook Baughman {Texas T«h) eamed a perfect 
4.0 GPAlbf the semester. 



The Associated Press 

FBC I Jackson, Brand speak to 
Congress about Title Vtl 

WASHINGTON — The Rev. te»e Jaduon 
lamented the lad( of black head coaches 
in college football in powerlirl language 
Wednesday, NCAA p^sident Mytes Brand ant 
congressmen from both panies. 

"When Afncan AnwKan coaches do well, 
we're delighted," Jackson told a Fkxise subcom- 
mittee. "Only the ignorant m surpRsed." 

Amid the strong words, however, the solution 
mighl come in a subtle threat uttered near 
the end of the heating. Perhaps, the point was 
made, it's time lo nuke title VII do for black 
coaches what Title IX did for women's sports. 

"l think it's pretty clear that etnbarTassrrtent 
hasnt been enough,' said Richard Lapchick, 
director of the Flonda based InstihJte for 
Diversity and Ethks in Sport. "One of the things 
we're thinking about is nUe VII lawsuiti'' 

Title VII of the 1%4 Gvil Rights Ad makes 
It illegal for en>pk>yers to discriminate on the 
bash of race 

The critKism of the colleges comes after a 
Super Bowl in which both teams were led by 
blick coaches: Tony Dur^gy of the tndianapoiis 
Colts and Lovle Smith of the Chicago Bears. The 
NFl has made sigr>ifkant strides In hiring blade 
coaches in recent years foikMing the Imple- 
mentaiioci of the'Booney Rule,' which fwcB a 
team to interview at least one minority. 

But at the college level, there are stagger- 
ingly few biadis in charge Of the 119 DivisiDn 
I- A schools, only six have black head football 
coaches. Th«F are even fewer in the tower 
divisMns five in Division I AA, two in Division 
II and one in Division III The figures eicclude 
hBtoncally black colleges. 

in addition, there are only 12 btadi athletic 
direaorsin Dhnsion l-A, aiMl not a single mafor 
conteiwce commissioner is black 

"Sadly, if the pace of progress remaim the 
same, it will be approximateJy SO years before 
vw iMth a percentage (of coaches! that ewn 
approttimates the number of AhKan Americans 
in the general population," Brand told the 
house Sukommrttee on Commerce, Trade and 
Consumer Protection. This is not only unacoei!*- 
able, this 5 unconscionably wrong' 

The NCAA lidts the power to tell its sdwob 
whom to hire — or e¥en whom to interview 
— so Brand has sought to influence them m 
other ways. The Bladi Coaches Assoaaikw's 
annual report card on minority hiring has added 
some transpairncy to the process, aiid the NCAA 
has set up academies lor potential coaches. 

But those measures haven't been enough 
Id break thnHigh the network that picks a 
new coach. The president athietK dicKtor, 
search committee, boani of trustees and detp- 
pocketed boosters all seem to havea voke, 
artd often they like to play It safe by hlftng 
estaWisbed coaches Changing sudv a culture 
Is drffiojit bvt Brand doesn't think the NCAA 
needs its own Rooney Rule to do so. 

"I think we hawe all the tools In place," Brand 
said "What we don't haw is talented, superb 
African -Amencar coaches brought into the 
infomul networks of athietK diiectors and 
others who are making the final fecammenda- 
born. We need to And a way to open 1$ that 
doted drde.' 

Kansas State athletic d»«ttpf Tim Weteer, wl» 
hired a black coach two years ago, suggested 
givirvg financial Incentives to schools who 
hire minofflies, but several witnesses went In 
the other d«ection, saying the foice of Uw Is 
needed to tear down racial baniefs. 

"HIslofy has proven that in order (w any 
significant progress to be made ir eradicating 
a social injustice, legal action has b««n the 
atalyst for change; said Floyd Hetth, presidenl 
of the BUd Coadies AssoditkMi. 



Thursday, March 1 , 2007 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 7 



FICTION 



Earbud Evil I The not-so-great escape 



UNSAS STATE COLLEGII^N 



Bdttor's mt»: H(j is the fourth stgment of "Earbud Evil," 
a fictional story the CotUgian is publishing daily for tht next 
three weeks. This story follows Alex, a fictional K-State student, 
as he dtals with a campus-wide aisis that threauns the univtr- 
$ity. 

Though (A* namts of real people will accompany made-up 
chsracters, all events are fictional This is intended for enter- 
tttinment and Is not factually based. 

Tou're t illly gooae, Aim," Katie giggled u ihe Intercepted 
me before my etcipe from the Union wu complete. "I just 
wanted to aik why you quit your job la«t month." 

She wai referring to the hard time i lerved at a certain Third 
^tlMt fa»t-food prison where she u«d to come pester me in her 
iput time, I left when I realized it was more like community 
service than employment - employed people get actual pay. 

"I didn't tell you?" I asked, sincerely confused Katie shook 
her head. "Well, the job sucked, so I quit, Is that better?" 

She laughed a bit harder than 1 thought was necessary. 



"Alex, what am f going to do with you?" Katie wondered 
aloud. "You're so tense and neurotic you make a guinea pig 
seem calm." 

I looked around to make sure Rhett was not about. 

"It's been a tough day, I'm just a little oH kilter Is all," 1 ex- 
plained, trying to think of a new subject and going with the first 
thing that came to mind "You going to the game tonight?" 

Katie laughed some more. 1 didn't know what made me so 
entertaining. 

"You've known me how many years, Alex? How many games 
have 1 miia«d in that time? Any?" the cackled tt my question. 
"Of course I'll be there Wild horses, the plague and a restrain- 
ing order couldn't keep me away from this one." 

it wu a sUly question, Katie being one of the most savage 
fans I'd ever known She asked if I was going with a tone that 
said my inquiry made her doubt me. 

"Yeah, but I won't be too close to the action," 1 said, thinking 
about all the crazier fans who were already sitting in line at the 
coliseum. "It sounds like a few thousand people already have 
me beat. Why aren't you out there yet?" 

She said she had to be in class until S JO p.m., after which 
time she would make an heroic eSort to get to the game. Her 



face made me worry for the safety of anyone who might get in 
her way. Katie asked when I'd head for Bramlage. 

"I have to get a bunch of reading done today so I'm ready 
when my history professor grills me tomorrow," 1 mumbled, 
thinking how every minute I studied put me a bit farth^ from 
the action. "I'll be there a good hour or so before tipoff. I hope 
there's some room left." 

We both nodded with sarcastic griiu - we knew how packed 
the coliseum would be at thai point. I wondered if I'd be able to 
make out the basketball or have to watch for an orange blur. 

*^eU, tveiy SMond you spend standing around Is wasted, 
so you better go hit those books." Katie ordered after the pause 
turned uncomfortable. 

She was right, I said goodbye and made a brisk walk to Hale 
Library, A few flights of stairs and I was sitting in Hale's great 
mural room. The massive hall in the library's oldest area makes 
you feel like an insect. 

I hunkered down and turned some pages, all the while trying 
not to think about the evening's game against the ]ayhawks. 

My phone vibrated to tell me I had a text message. It was 
from Katie. 

"Party after game," it read, "my house." 



Consignment sale offers children's items 



■yEils«f>odhBjsky 

: KANSAS STATKOILEGIAN 

' Little Britches Children's 
Consignment will sponsor its 
ninth volunteer consignment 
sale from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m and 
2 to 4 p.m, Saturday at Crest- 
view Christian Cliurch, 4761 
Tlittle Creek Blvd. 

Little Britches is a semi-an- 
nual consignment sales event 
that specializes in high quality, 
gently used children's clothing, 
furniture, gear and maternity 
Items. 

Associate F^istor Chris En- 
sley said the one-day event is 
great for parents and families 
to come and get a good deal 
on anything for infants and 
toddlers. 

The clothing items for sate 
pt Little Britches range from 
preemie to juniors. There also 
will be baby equipment, nurs- 



ery items, play equipment. 
sports equipment, shoes, ma- 
ternity clothing, toys, books, 
games, videos and video games 
at the sale. 

Sarah Gido, co-owner of 
Little Britches, said her expec- 
tations for Saturday's sale are 
high. 

"I think it's going to be a 
great sale," she said. "We had 
over 100 consignors last sale 
wilh great quality items Each 
time, the sale grows a little bit, 
and everyone really puts in a 
lot of effort." 

Gido said the sale is com- 
pletely run by volunteers. 

According to Little Britches' 
Web site, www.liiilebritches- 
sales.com, the event is a great 
opportunity for consignors to 
clean out and cash in on un- 
wanted children's items. 

"We really feel like it's a 
win-win situation" Gido said. 



"It's great for consignors, shop- 
pers and everybody involved." 

From 2 to 4 p.m.. all items 
will be marked down by 50 
percent or more at the con- 
signers' discretion. 

Items not sold will be col- 
lected by the consignors or 
donated to nonprofit and 
charitable organizations in the 
after -sale party. 

Gido said Little Britches 
has partnered with the Cri- 
sis Center of Manhattan and 
other nonprofit agencies since 
spring 2005. 

"We send invitations 
through to (these organiza- 
tions) lo individuals who might 
need items from our sale," she 
said "Those who are invited 
can choose from the items that 
don't sell or that consignors 
have chosen to donate and 
shop for free. It's the best part 
of the sale" 



Shopping 1^ 




■ Aniw Nriy (and corw back titer] for the tmt dealt, f njoy tttc salt as eatty ai 
9 ».m. and tonw tad< betwwn I and 4 ;iin., when mail itwtis m half price. 

■ (hlldrpn m vwkome it th« ule but pl«as« use CK»d tud^m«nt when brirvghig 
them. It li very bu^y, and little on*i could get into places they shouldr't. If 
po»ible, givt youf\elf som« alone time to shop with peace of mlad. 

NOTt: Children are not allowed to play with toys at the sale. Items arr the prop- 
erty al consignors and If they are brolien or separated they cannot t)e sold. This 
wi be strictly enforced. 

■ Brkigshiflg children's vm and a tape measure. For shoes, trace your children's 
fctt tai pica of cardboard or sturdy piece of paper, cut it out and bring It to slide 
hKtdcaihMtoseerftthb. 

■ Bring cash Of a ched^bool - credit ants are not aaefNed. 

■ A hip pad will prevent your purse From slipping off your ann while trying to 
carry many things. 

■ Check out the Web site of Ihe U.S. Consumer Products Safety CouncH, an 
independent F«knl ngabtory agency that helps keep American families safe by 
reducing the risk ofliOwif Of death from consumer products. It lists Items thai are 
recalled. ltttpJ/www.qKcgw/qKq>ab/pftrti/piml.html 




I All sales are final, so selea items carefully. 



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Pages 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Thursday, March 1, 2007 




Catrin* Rtwton [COllEGIAN 
Jsni* Anthony, tvntor In mathamatkt ■nd music Mlucatlan, and Cathy Dowltng, tanlor In muric tducatton, p«rform during ttie dress 
rehearsal oi "Cosi Fan Tutte" Tuesday evening at McCain Audrtorium. The camedic opera opens tonight at 8 p.m. and runs through March 3. 

Students to perform comedic Mozart opera 



ByErk[>«vls 

HAHMS5IAIEt(liltt(*N 

K- State opera and theater 
students will perform Mozart's 
cumedic opera, "Cosi Fan 
Tlitte," thjs weekend at McCain 
Auditorium. 

The opera, which Mozart 
wrote in 1790, wiU be a dual 
project of K- State's departments 
of music and speech communi- 
cation, theater and dance. A 
joint performance by the two 
department occurs aimuaUy 

Reginald Pittman, director 
of the production and associate 
ptofeaor of musk, said "Coti" 



will (eature 14 student cast mem- 
bers, including six lead singers 
and an eight-person chortis. A 
fiiU orch^tra will accompany 
the opera 

The opera revolves around a 
wager made early in the show. 
Naval officers Fernando and 
Guglielfno bet friend Don Al- 
fonso that their fiancees, sisters 
DorabelJa and Fiordiligj, will re- 
main faithful even if pursued by 
other men. The two men then 
pretend they must leave on a 
naval assignment and dress up 
as strangers. Each pursues the 
other's fianc^ in an attempt to 
prove D(Ki AUofuo's theoiy of 



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women's fickleness wrong. 

Janie Anthony, senior in 
mathematics and music educa- 
tion, is one of the performers. 
Anthony plays Dorabella, one 
of the sisters who is wooed by 
the other's fianc^ 

Anthony said she is excited 
about the production this week- 
end after rehearsing for the last 
six weeks. She also said it is ex- 
tremely difficult to sing in a Mo- 
zart opera. 

"It's an amazing experience 
being on stage with great sets 
and costumes," Anthony said. 

Cathy Dowiing, senior in 
music education, plays Fiordil- 



igi, the other sister in the pro- 
duction. 

"It has been a lot of work, 
but it has all been worth it," 
Dowiing said when asked about 
her experience in preparing for 
the opera. 

She also said people who 
have never been to an opera 
should go to experience what 
th^ are like. 

The opera will start at 8 to- 
night and run March 1-3 at Mc- 
Cain Auditorium. 

The opera orig^Uy was 
written in Italian. However, the 
cast will perform an English 
translation of the opera. 



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Graduate sdiool entrance 
exam to adopt new format 



tyftywtl 

[UllYCOlLEaAN(l>tNNSrATI) 

UNIVERSITY PARK. Pa. 
- Time is running out for stu- 
dents to register for the Grad- 
uate Record Examination 
General Test before the exam 
switches formats. 

"A lot of time when we in- 
troduce a new test, everyone 
rushes to take the old t^ 
before it stops, and the test- 
ing centers get overwhelmed," 
said Ibm Ewii% spokesman 
for Education Testing Ser- 
vices, which administers the 
ORE. 

The la^ day to take the 
current GR£ General TkH it 
July 31, according to an ETS 
press release. The test wiU not 
be offered during August, and 
the first date for the new test 
will be Sept 10. 

The new test is signifi- 
cantly longer - more than 
four hours, compared to two- 
ond-a-half-hours for the cur- 
rent test, said Susan Kaplan, 
director of graduate ptogruns 
at Kaplan Tfest Prep and Ad- 
missions. It will focus on 
skills more directly related to 
graduate school and will aim 
to reduce the effects of memo- 
rization, according to ETS's 
Web site, itmnit.ets.org. Also, 
the test will feattire a linear 
format, instead of the current 
"adaptive" format in which 
questions vary according to 
the test taker's performance. 

Ewing said the test could 
not be o&ered during August 
because time was needed to 



transition to the new format. 
Students can register for the 
current test on the Web site. 
Registration for the new test 
begins Jkily 1. 

Ewing said the current 
ORE test can be delivered 
six days a week, but the new 
test will be administered only 
about 35 times a year. 

Tb accommodate mon 
students during the reduced 
number of testing dates, Ew- 
ing said the new test would be 
administered at about three 
times as many centers as the 
old test, including univo^ity 
computer labs. 

Kaplan said she encourages 
students to register as soon as 
possible for the current test 

"We do think the test dates 
are going to fill up," Kaplan 
said "People are looking to 
take the test before it changes 
if they can." 

Kaplan said the company 
recommended taking the cur- 
rent test if possible because ot 
the time difference. ' 

"People are going to have 
to build up that stamina to 
be able to sit for a four-hour 
exam," she said. 

Kaplan said students plan- 
ning to apply to paduate pro- 
grams in the fall should take 
the current test because scores 
for the new test will not be re- 
leased until mid-November 

Kaplan said the company 
woiJd begin ofiering pro- 
grams this summer for the 
new test. She said information 
about the chaitge is available 
at www.kaptest.com/newgre. 




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ARTS I ENTERTAINMENT | SEX | FOOD | YOUR LIFE 

THE EDGE 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



m 



a month of 

MUSIC 



lay at five venues in Aggieville through the end of March 



SUNDAY 



MONDAY 



TUESDAY 



WEDNESDAY 



THURSDAY 



FRIDAY 

2TlMCain», 
Citlbh 
Whiskty, 
PuiauCiMagc 

10 p.m. at RJ's 



SATURDAY 



KSU SjrmphMiT 
bnd 2nd /biniHJ 
BtmlitSlww 

8p.m.dtf*J.^ 

pHttfcfgattw/ 
The Wood Mitf 

10 p.m. at AufltM 




HthOA 



Local musicians play for 'Invisible Children' fundraiser 



iy Eric Irown 

KANSAS SlAIKOLUdlAN 

Last night's performance 
^i Radina's Coffeehouse and 
bakery was more tfian the 
traditional Wednesday -night 
khawcase of local acoustic 
musicians The event raised 
Kinds for fnvisible Children 
fnc. 

; The benefit concert, which 
featured sets by TVlcr Gregory, 
Margo May, Aid, members of 
Ihe band Shhh and percussion 
performances by Tim Schuler 
and lohii Asperin, required no 
cover charge at the door Em 
ployees collected donations 
for the Invisible Children ben 
^fit during the show, which 
lasted firom 6 to 10 p.m. 

Radina's also donated 10 



pwrcent of alt drink and food 
sales during tfie perfornianc- 
ra, and the employees on duty 
contributed all of the night's 
tips to the benefit 

"We were more than will- 
ing to donate the money we 
made tonight." said Heather 
Parker, Radina's employee. 
"This is definitely a worth 
while cause." 

Invisible Children Inc. 
spawned from the documen 
tary film, "fnvisible Children," 
which three college students 
produced in 2003. The docu- 
mentary focuses on the chil 
dren of Northern Uganda, 
who regularly are abducted to 
be trained as child soldiers. 

Tim Schuler. Radina's mu- 
sic manager, said he finl saw 
the documentary a year ago 



"1 was incredibly moved by 
the film," Schuler said. "And 
as soon as I heard that they 
were showing the film at the 
Union this week and that or 
ganizatinn was going to be in 
Manhattan, it made sense to 
use our music night us a way 
of raising money for the ben- 
efit," 

[oey Murphy, known as 
Aid on the Manhattan music 
scene, said he was more than 
willing to contribute his per- 
formance to the cause 

"Playing shows like these 
kind of keeps you in check 
and makes you realize there 
are bigger causes out there 
that music can make a contri- 
bution to," Murphy said. "It's 
a very cool thing to be a pari 
of." 




Playlrtg 
tha guitar, 

harmonica 
and tambou- 
rlna, Tyl«r 
Gregory, 
Fr«shman at 
Manhattan 
Tich, plays 
the first of 
four sets for 
a benefit 
concert at 
Radina's. 
The money 
raised Ment 
to Invisible 
Children, lr>c. 

JMlyrtBfawn 

(oaEOiAN 



Page I 

CELEB NEWS 

P^HHtDnaxiM face jail time 

WSTHOaTWOOO,C»lit -PMtiHIIIiDO 
axikl hdw h«r probation ttvokcd — possMy 
itsutthg ifv jail tinr ^ If sheis fbumito hne 
been dr^rtq with i us- 
pended kttat, jiithort- 
tlKud Wednesday. 

hoklhetRSinditarof 

TtieSlmplfLlff'vws 
lidtetrd for driving with 
tsuspeivMlluftse 
en Tuesday, utd las 
AngelK Canity ihaMh 
SgtDuineAlMiJt 

ShrwisstD|ipMl 
about 1 1 pm. after authonti» saw tht or 
speeding with Its headlights dH, MIerv said. 

DrKe we're aWe to wnfy that M Iss Hi Hon 
MS drMng the wtude, vve wi requefl th« ttw 
00i>t Kwke her pniiMtion and Ml a probation 
,'sM IM Veiisque;, asfntos- 
imnfkjTtlwliisAngriesdtyjttorDey^affia. 

HiltDn could bee up to 90 days Irv jail if a 
judge finds she violated her pmbatiOA, he Mid. 

"That is certainly one of tite posslbtlltiev'' 
Vebsqueisakl. 

hi ianuary, Mthm pleaded no cofytest to 
akshol-rplated recktes drtvinq stemniir>g ftwn 
a Sepl 7 aiT«st in Hollywood She was sentenced 
to J6 months' probation; akohol education and 
$1,500 In fines. 

— IK* AssDdated Prtsi 

BILLBOARD 
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Page 10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Thursday, March 1,2007 



CLINTON I Former president to speak without fee 



continued (rom Page 1 

Landoii Kss^ebaum Baker, R- 
Kait. Landuti's dau{th(er. was 
not going to be able tu attend 
the letlurc Clinton wanted 
Kassohaum Baker prcH'nl so he 
could thank her, so he asked to 
reschedule 

L'poit his nn peach me nt in 
1998, KesfSJin «itd Clinton was 
not scheduling any speaking 
events, and after his presidency, 
he spent time in the Middle Easi 
and in Africa. 

Clinton is the only U.S presi- 
dent since Richard Nixon who 
had nut given a Landun Lecture 



Since the Landon Lecture Series' 
start in 1966. six U.S. presidents 
and three foreign presidents have 
presented Landon Lectures. 

Coincidentally, there were no 
Landon Lecturers at K State in 
1998 due to CUnton's impeach- 
ment and public figures' hesi- 
tancy to leave Washington, O.C, 
Reagan said 

Clinton's appearance at 
K- St ate comes approximately 
(our months after former U.S. 
Secretary of Defense Donald 
Rumsfeld's Landon Lecture and 
14 months after the appearance 
of President George W Bush 

Reagan said he and K-State 



President )on Wefatd make a 
list each year of speakers they 
would like to invite for Landon 
Lectures. They also take sugges- 
tions for potential speakers from 
students and faculty members, 
Reagan said. Although the re- 
cent roster of lecturers seems to 
favor Republicans, Reagan said 
he looks for political balance 
in speakers who come. Also, it 
is often the speakers' schedules 
that decide when they can pres- 
ent a Landon Lecture, he said. 

"We have loU of invitations 
out all the time," Reagan said. 
"We generally cannot control 
who can come when." 



ainton's college lectures 

m Clinton urmf itmi $) 1 million in 
tpeiking to from 2001 to 200S, ac- 
conJing to Kllliry Ctlnlon'i Seiwt* ethto 
reports. Th« follawing is j list of tewrtl 
cMt^ ini univmlty related wniiK at 
whkli he lus delivcml lecture wtth the 
(bit, MIowed by sponsor and payment 

■ M«fd) 26, 2001, Saiem SUtc College 
Foundation, $125,000 

■ On 13, 2001.Th« London School of 
Economics, $28, too 

■ Jan ]\ 2002, Educational imtthittof 
AHLA,S125,()00 

■ Marrti M, 2002, Tufd Untvmity, 
5125,000 

■ May 6, 2002, Hunter Coll«<|e Founda 

tktns, mm 

■ June 1 1, 2002, The Amerkan Untvtr- 
i(lyint)ul»l,$1SO,000 

— TlMWuhingtonPosI 



MASCOTS I Despite odd characteristics, mascots popular with fans 



continued from Page 6 

attended otherwise. Overall. 
Willie is a cool cat. Except for 
the concept of a giant cat head 
with a human body. 

Originally, Willie was a full 
wildcat. However, according to 
the K State Web site, this outfit 
made Willie look too similar to 
Mickey Mouse. 

In 1967. sculptor Jim Hagan 
created the first Willie head It 
had a more fierce visage, ac- 
cording to the Web site. 



Over the years, Willie trans 
formed into a more receptive 
mascot. One question remains, 
though : Why just the enormous 
cat head? 1 would understand 
such a costume if we were the 
K-State Cat men, but that sim- 
ply is not the case. 

K Stale is not the only 
university with a Willie the 
Wildcat. Northwestern Univer 
sity also has a Willie roaming 
the sidelines. NU's Willie is 
fully clad, though, and looks 
like an enormous recreation of 



Tom from the "Tom and Jerry" 
cartoons So maybe our Willie 
the Wildcat isn't that bad after 
all. 

The truth is, people like mas- 
cots whether they are ridicu- 
lous or not. They provide side 
entertainment and allow fans a 
different glimpse of the game 

Although the aforemen- 
tioned mascots are unconven- 
tional and sometimes silly, they 
represent the traditions and 
history of their respective uni- 
versities, no matter how idiotic 



they seem to other schools. 
Mascots are not created 
to help players on the field 
or intimidate other teams or 
players. They serve as liaisons 
from the football team to the 
crowd and represent sports his- 
tory, whether they are a fierce 
bundle of hay with arms and 
legs or a stately collegian. 



Scott Qirard Is a sophomoff In pdnt jour- 
nalism. Please send comments to ipertiin 
ipub.idu.t4ii. 



PUZZLED 




Tim WItkins, freshman in pre-prof*sslonal secondary 
•ducat wn, tak«s a break from his homework by 
working on a puzzle at Moore Hall Wednesday afte^ 
noon. 



ufetiiTw ~ 



ILJveryone 




'oadwnise,call5]]-iSfilL 



/ 



Congratulations to the Fall 



y 



2006 Pledge Class of 



t 



Bryce J. Bartu 
Trent R. Byquist 
Colin R. Cummings 
J. Paul Fangman, Jr. 
Jeffrey G. Ferguson 
Kevin W. Goebel 
Jacob S. Kaunley 
Jared M. Keating 
Scott A. Lange 
Daniel J. Long 
Adam H. Love 
Jay K. Marcus 
William H. Miller 



I 



Philip B. Newman 
Joseph W. Norris 
Patrick H. OTlynn 
Joshua W. Oiler 
Aaron M. Ortbals 
Adam B. Pfautsch 
Nicholas L. Rauth 
Jeremy F. Ruff 
Jared M. Schnefke 
Tyler F. Shepherd 
Ryan P. Thomas 
Austin G. Waldo 
Calen M. Young 
Carter B. Young 



Alpha Tau Omega Alpha Tau Omega Alpha Tau Omega 







4 


^ 






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NEW: 


AGGIEVILLE PICK-UP STATION 

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• Call 539-0480 if not in the Aggieville area 


i 




Every Weekend! 

Thursday, Friday, and Saturday 

1Tpm-3am 








A free service provided by the K-State SGA. 





CLASSIFIEDS 



Classifieds continue 
on the next page 




Bulletin Board 




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b« p4acM f*«« lor trim 



7 3. 4 Bed'OOfpi 

Slijfiio, ond Loh 
[inrtmpnt^ Avaikifi'' 

\il-Nrw fo( Foil ?007 

Apply At: 
532-3790 




Rent Apt Furnbhed 



Manhanan CITY Ordl 
nanca 4814 (laurM av- 
ary paraon equal apponu- 
nltykirMuaingiirilhouldit- 
llndlon on accounl of 
race, 9*n, familial itatui, 
mHKary alalua, dtaaMltty, 
raltgton, aga, eolOf. na- 
Uonal origin or ancMtry. 
VIolalkinB ahouk] tM r*- 
portad to trie Director ol 
Human Raaourcee at CItv 
HM, (7>6}SaT-2440. 



MAMM»TTAN CITY OrtN- 
nanca 4S14 BMUrM ev- 
ery paraon equal oppodu- 
nny in riouaing wWioutdla- 
lincllon on account of 
raca. aax, lamiUal alalue, 
mlillary ttatut, diaabliitv, 
religion, a^a. color, na- 
tional origin or ancaalry. 
Vlolatloni ahouifi b« re- 
ported 10 Iha Director of 
Human Reeourcae at CHy 
Kali, (7IIS)UT-244<I. 



1117 VATTIER New all 
electric. Two -bed rooms, 
apphancea lurnisried. no 
peU Clou to campus 
763-539 1975 or 

795-313-8292 

1219 KEARNEY One- 
bedroom. June, year 
lease Watari iraah paid. 
Next to campua. off atreet 
par king No pet& (350 
785 539-5136 

1219 KEARNEY TWO- 
8EDROOiU5 August, 
year lease Water/ traslv 
paid. Next to campus, olt 
■ilreal pan(ii>g. No pels 
^660 7e5-539-S136 



ALLIANCE PHOPERTV 
IMANAGEMENT OoB-beO 

rai.^ih Jur^H, July. Augusi 

78S 539-4357 www.reni- 
acm.wm 



AVAILABLE JUNE 1. ona- 
badroom, large, clean 
Only pay eleclncllv. Small 
pets allowed Balcony, 
greal location $570/ 
month 785-341-7289, 




Need a 

New 

Place to 

Live? 



Check the 



ONE- THREE-BED- 

ROOIriS. near campua. 
August lease, pela ok. 
785-776-2051 

ONE-BEDROOM 
ACROSS tile street Irom 
campus S425 par month. 
No pM. Available JunaJ 
TBe-313-7473 



CLEAN TWO -BED ROOM 
in tour plex with washer/ 
drysr in unit Water and 
trash paid No pets, S500/ 
montfi 785-539- 23S6 

ONE. TWO. tour, tive-bed- 
room apartmenls/ housas 
lor June and August 
leases. 785-564-0857 

ONE, TWO. throe. an<t 
iour-bedroom apartments 
Close (o campus and ag- 
OievtWe Partiing and laun- 
dry 785-539 5*00 

ONE. TWO. threa, lour, 
tive. SIX bedroom apart- 
merU/ houses next to cam- 
pus Washer/ dnret. cen- 
tral sir No Pals 
785-537-TO$«. 



ONE-BEDBOOM APART- 
MENTS in quiel ^x-plex 
at 1811 Piatt. AvaiiabJe 
June tsl. Unlurnlshed. 
cenlrai air, parking, water 
and trash pak) No pels. 
{375 per month Call KSU 
Foundation at 
7BS-S32.7S69 Or 
78S-S32 754I. 

ONE-BEDROOM TO live 
bedrooms Apartmania, 
dupiaxes and homes. 
Most close Id campus 
Some farther away. June 
or Auguat leases. Check 
out our website www - 
emeraldproperlymanag- 
ment.oom or call EmeraU 
Property Management 
7S5S87-9000 lor more in- 
tormailon 

PARK PLACE Apsrl- 
ments. One- Bedrooms. 
Summar/ tail leasing Pais 
welcome One- hall mila 
from KSU at Sath Chik) 
and Cialiin 785-539-2951 

PARK PLACE Apart- 
menta Two bedrooms. 
Pets welcome Summer/ 
Fail leasing One- haH 
mile Irom KSU at Seth 
Child and Clallir. 
785-539- 2951 

THREE AND lour-had- 
room apartments avaii- 
abie in August Cloee to 
campus. Water and trtah 
paid Com operated laun- 
dry 785-537-7810, 
785-537-2255 

TWO. THREE and foor- 
bedrooms. dose ki cam- 
pus, central air, dish- 
washer, laundry lacillliei 
No pels, available Febnj 
ary 1 785-539-0888. 

1 



TWO BEDROOM SPE 
ClAl at Peril Place Apart- 
ments $495 rent plus free 
cable through July 07. 
785-539-2961 

TWO-BE DROOt^^. 
CLOSE to cahHMja Per- 
sonal washer/ dryer $645- 
$675/ month 

785 M1-44>>6 

TWO-BEDROOM many 
si2es ar^t pricus, June or 
August 785-341-0686 

WHY RENT mtEH VOtJ 
CAN BUVT Condoa for 
sale Two end ihrM-tMtf- 
room starting at $t12,650 
eoiiegiateviiia.com 
785-537-2098. 

WILDCAT VILLAGE Avaii- 
Rbis June or Auguat tour- 
bedroom, two beth, 
washer/ dryar, storm 
room, $1400 Cable pakt 
785-778-2425 or 

785-585-3760 wwwvil- 
lage-rentals,cam 



Spacious ' 
Duplexes 

Custom bui't witli ttiB 
K State student 

in mirni 

Etch duplBv iishirai walk-Ill 
cktseit. Ill kilciitit 
eppliances. wislwr/drytr. oil 
itritt parknij. (ihon* tiHl 
cable cvmactioni m avsry 
rown, tfcurity lightingH tratli 
tndlMKictra 

Secunty ilepoM l« Via sxne 
ai oaa awniti't rant Tlw 
lasH pmiot begnt Auguti 1 

tei ona yaar 

4 Bettrooma, 2 Batha 

1,300 Sq Ft 
0NLYI1,150/mo 

Safry. No P*t*l 

Quiet Neighborhood, 

Convenient and Close 

to Cempuft. 

■>■¥< 31 1-0TS1 

IM|MilM7-4Ma 



1420 

Beechwood Terraccj 

Newer Apartitvent 
Lq 2 i 3 Bedrooms 
1' Baths 
Wi5her/Dryer 
EnerOT Efficient 

On aWoadeil 

Secluded 2 Acre Lut 

with Creek 



$740 & teas 

341-4024 



NOW LEASING 



idrgp2B«1rfxiiri ApK 

Cambridge Square 

Sands! one 

Ppbhtebfook 



a fti^;ii | i (^*>(t 



Open SKijrd^ 10 j 

937-9084 

nbefMLun 



•2O0OCa4l*£« Hte' 

•1114 Frmnont* 

•Slfl Omx«* 



IX 



A(tv«rt(«« in 
th« Classifieds 



Call 



Pre-lease 

Today for 

Spring! 

Only A few 
homes remain 

Amenitiei: 
•Waiher/Dryen or 

hookups avatlable 
•On-site Management 
•'■J ^get Available 

ate Fitneii Center 
•^i<.'i;>i Center 
•Peaceful Garden 

Setting 
•£normoui Clbseti 

KEOBCiETHWN 

776-8080 



Few Spaces Ratnain for 
'Graduate Sludentt 
• Utipet Clasirtiei) 



• iiHi Pal Ll( Saiifi; 

• ttnti f«tn iMF 

Caftaoiai Sanica 

MuahaiilrQi *«*<Ni»ilii" 
LiUtana levvy m >niriu' 
tl>iiSiwM a a | a Mi 9to 
« M Tine WeiRaaui Itaiainf 
> n mm tnwpin 'iiiii 



^»ESTCHE5TER PARK 
776-1118 



FOUH-BEDROOM 
THREE baths. August, 
$1280, nice, washer/ 
dryer hookups, on-street 
partiing. great location, no 
pel*/ smoking 

?a5 532 B25G 

LOOKING FOR three 
foommates in tout-bed- 
room duplei 500 
Laramie S285 per rooin 
Washer/ Dryer 

7B5-410-23t6 or 

785 447 0852 



THREE-SEOHOOM 


UNIT, 


located al 8/ 802 


North 


51h Na pels, $975' 


month 


available June t 


785-564-0372 



WALK TO Class One, 
two. three, lourbedroom 
No smoking, no linnhing, 
no pels ?85 539-1554, 



ill 



V 




1015 PieRRE Very mce, 
tour -bedroom Fenced in 
bacK yard Spacious 
roorrts. Wastier/ dryer. 
July or August lease All 
pels considered Chris. 
785-770-2161 



1310 


N. tith. 


Two-t>6d- 


room 


June lease No 


pets. 


ch>i« to 


campus 


785-539- 197S 


or 


785-313-8292 





1417 NICHOLS, touf-bsd- 
rooms, lamily room 1909 
Kenmar, three -bed rooms. 
Both two Oaihrooms. 
washer/ dryer, garage 
game room, fenced yard/ 
patio 785-5391177 



AVAILABLE JUNE 1 
Three-bedroom house lO- 
celed at t50t Harry 
Hoed, Two bhKks west ol 
campus, central air, 
washer/ dryer, tonced 
yard. 785-539-3672 

CLEAN. QUIET baaament 
apartmonl Two-bedroom, 
two bath, lull liitchen, pa- 
tio 1385 par monlh per 
person All utilities in- 
cluded emiiyfr^ ksu.edu. 

FIVE-BEDROOM, TWO 
bath house lor rem. 931 
Vattier June lease. 
Washer' dryer, window alr- 
conditionff>g Fenced bacti- 
yard, pets allowed Ofl- 
straat parking $1500/ 
month 785-539-4949 

FIVE -BEDROOM June, 
July, Augui^l Alliance 
Propeny Management 
7B5-539-4357 www,ront- 
apm com 

FDR REM Newer lour- 
tiudroom duplei Oood k>> 
c: a I ion with dishwaatver, 
washer and dryer. No 

pets. siteo 

788-537-7597 

FoU^To (ive-bedroon*. 
two bath washer/ dryar, 
central sit, dishwasher. 
Close 10 campus. 
785-532-9564 

F4uR-Bfe6R66M XnB 
si4-bedroom house* 
CloBe 10 campus and Ag- 
gieville Parking and lawn- 
dry 785-539-5800 

FOUR-BEDROOM, ONE 
bath house lo* rent 900 
Vattier June lease 
Washer/ drj^ar, canlrai air- 
conditioning FetKed beck 
yard, pels allowed, $1200/ 
month Party ahack and 
garage Irvciudad. 

785-539-4949 



1BIS1HIS 



502 FREMONT, Ihree-bed 
room, one bflih. no pets 
Available Juno 1 
785-539-1975 
785-313-8292. 



FOUR-BEDROOM. TWO 
and one-hall bath, shidy 
August 1 S975 per 
01 month Knight Real Es- 
tate Can 78S-S39-S394 



Classifieds continue 
from the previous page 



CLASSIFIEDS 



To place an advertisement call 



Thursday, March 1, 2007 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 1 1 



• II II I I 

■ ■ ■ ■ ' ~ 



- 11 II 

■" ■• 'J S 



■III 11 
= "J J. ■■ 



LET'S RENT 



Rent-Apt UnptmUhed 



10K APARTMENTS ipa- 
cioua Iwo-ijedfooin opari^ 
mant In modam compJax 
«M0 blocks MSt ol cam- 
pui ■< 1010 K«am«y 
Qul«t streel, quaWy stu- 
dent Irv^nq tjirgs L.- 
Btiaped kitchen, tl\at\- 
iNuhar. ait oondHJonIng, 
sound proclaci, wa> Inau- 
latad. low utHIUas. launttty 
room, no pau. Juna 1- 
May laaw. S580 Cail 
765-539-2536 

t21S POVNTZ, livQ-twd- 
rooma, across Irom city 
pB/k with on-straat parli- 
<ng. CanBal air, Mashar/ 
dryer Nautral colors iMn 
total ra-moM. Water and 
irash paid June lease, ^4a 
pels 785-313^8)2 

162B FAIR VIEW. Quiel 
one-J]ednx>m ISMO) and 
Studio <t375) near KSU. 
Laundry Water, trash 
paid No pels, no smoli- 
ing 1 JUNE. 

sSoTTTstfmoTtoSis 

to K- State srH) Agglevllle 
twro-lMdroom apartments 
Clean, qutet. prtvate parX- 
Ing. No smoking, no pets 
Juna and AugiMt 
785-539-5508 or 
^6-864-0657 

JUNE LEASE Iwo-twd 
room apflrtrT>Bnt. Walk [o 
campus. Ekcallant ccnd* 
tmn/ tocation. tittpj/WW*.- 
r«ntKsiate.com 

785-410-28t4 

LARorfW5:Bl5RB3B 

dear close to ca/mpus. 
BIHapaM 785 7e2-7i9i 

LARGE TWO-BEO- 

ROOM, avallatile June. 
Balony. rireplaca and 
dishwaslier. Vary clew* to 
campu*. Call 

785-317-3760 Leave 

message 

PRE-LEASINO JUNE and 

Augutt. Some units brand 
rvaw, c:ldsa to KSU. 
washer^ dryer induded. 
Call tor details 

785-776-2102. youngwdk- 
•VyahooMni, www.wUk- 
aapta.oom 



Rent-Apt Un!imlSh&} 



TMREE-BEDRIXIM WITH 
porch and aunroorn, Sti 
BJuemonil. August 1 laaw. 
laundry included, no pats. 
$945 plus utilities. 
715-31 3-04*2 leave mas- 
sage. 

fiii kUb three-Ud- 
room, Ctose to campus 
Cantral air. dishwasher, 
coin operated laundry la- 
cinty. Availatile June or 
August No pets 

785-537 t7*« 0( 

785-539-1545 




1111 WHARTON Manor 
Road, lour-twdroom bwer 
level duplex witti neutral 
colors, two baths, washer' 
dryer tumished 817 Vat- 
tW. ttirae-bedroom kiwer 
level duplsi with new car- 
pet, neutral cokirs and 
washer/ dryer hook-ups. 
Very reasonable rent with 
great space in both du- 
plexes. Jui>e lease No 
pals. Cat 765-31 3-46 te 




100T KEARNEV Four- 
Bedroom, also have 
Three. Frve, Slit and 
Seven-Bedroom houses. 
Ail JUNE 1 rentals Pets 
OK 785-317-7713 

t022 HUMBOLT. 824 

Freerikjnt, 1116 Ratone, 
hHir-tMdrtx>m, two bath, 
washer/ dryer, dish- 
washer, central air 
11160 11300 Doug, 
765-313-5573 

1309 PIERRE, 11 to 

Pomeroy SHOO - St 200 
Four-bedraom. two bath, 
washer/ dryer, dish- 
washer, central air Au- 
gual taaaa 785-313-5573, 
Doug 



Serrt-Houj« 



1S3B CAMPUS Road 
Four-bedroom, two baths 
Central air. waeher/ dryer 
tumished. Neutral colors 
with nkse, new baths 
Latg* batfrooma lor an al- 
torUabla prk» June 
leaaa. No pets 

786-aia.wg. 

200 N. imi On City Park 
Two large, sunny three- 
t>edroom ($750) Laundry 
Water, trash pakl. No 
pets, no srrwking t JUNE 
and t AUGUST 
530-342-1 tat 

820 OSAGE. 1524 Pipher. 
3100 James. aH tour-bed- 
rooms, two bath June 1 

785-317-7713 

A SIX or sawan-bwlrooin 

house, three bathrooms. 
Two bk)cks to KSU June 
1 785-317-7713 

BEAUTIFUL REMOD- 
ELEOhOOlM 1612, 1614 
Pierre, tour- five-twdroom. 
two bath, fresh carpet/ 
paint New kitclier. bath, 
modem appllarKes. Ckiae 
to campus. Move in June: 
August, 78»30«^a8T 

SftlTTNAY RIDGE town 

houM lout' livt>-b&droorTi. 
two and one-hall baths, in- 
cludes appliancas. 
washer.' dryer No pets 
Available August 1 
316-393-9626 

^IVE-BEDROOM 
HOUSE. Walk 10 campus 
Two krtchens, flra p la c ee, 
central an, neutral cokys, 
washer/ dryer tumishtad, 
garage lawn malnte- 
r^anCfl. Jur>e lease. No 
pais CaN7B$-313-4«12 

bath June lease, washer, 
dryer, dishwasher, central 
air $1400.00/ ironth. 
7t5-3T3-$ST3 Doug 

NEW USTING, available 
June 1. Four to five-bed 
mom house kx:ated east 
0) Aggteviile at 624 
Larwnle Two bath, 
waalwr/ dryer. dl^- 
washer. central air Lease 
deposit plus utwtlea. 
785-539-3872 



Rent-Houses 



NEXT TO campue. iNte 
through sl« -bedroom 

houses, and efMrtments. 
Washer/ dryer, central air. 
Available now or tail. No 
pets TU-537-7a50. 



ONE AND thrwttad- 
roolM, utimive paid. 
washer/ dryer. Near cam- 
pus and city park. August 
t 785-532-95«4 



ONE -8 ED ROOM FULL 
b«lti. waMier/ dryer, no 
smokers 515 VSttler, 
$340 plus utitllies Augu«l 
l««*«. Call Monday - Frt- 
day. 785-776-4805. 



THREE-^EDnOOM TWO 

bath, washer/ dryer, no 
smokers. 515 Vattier. 
IKS plus utilities AuguM 
IMM. Call Monday - Fh- 
day. 785-776-4805 



THREE-BEOROOM TWO 
bath. 1205- 1207 

Pomeroy. June lease, 
washer. dryer. dish- 
waster, central air. 
$1050 00' month. 

766-31 3-5673 Doug 

TWO AND Itiree -bed- 
rooms TWO blocks lo cam- 
pua. Juna and August 
leases. No pets, laundry 
ttooK-ups, central air. 
$295/ bedroom 

7KS-336-1124 



TWO-BEDROOM base 

ment apartment. Washer/ 
dryer No pels $600/ 
manth. Cheap utliniaa. 
Available Auguit 1 1211 
Thurston. 785-866-3471 
cat aner 
7pm 

TWO-BEDROOMS, one 

balh. attached garage. 
Central air. appliances, 
washer/ dryer No pets 
August. $730 

785-537-8420. 
785-341-5346 



Rent-Houses 



FOUn-BCDROOM, TVIfO 
bath. nk:e sized bed- 
rcioms. Central air, two 
ear garage, wast>er/ dryer. 
No pets/ smohing SI 400/ 
month, available n Au- 
gust. 1430 Vista Lane, 
two and one halt bkicks 
from campus. 

316-680-1709 

FSniTBEBSSSn-lwS 

bath, two kitct^ens. dose 
to campus 785-341-9459 

FOUR6E0RO0M 
JUNE. July. August Al- 
Hance Properly Manse*- 

meni 785-539-43S7.»bim(.- 

tflni-mm.jxm 

ONE HOUSE 2031 
Tecumseh Four-bed- 

room, two bath. June t 
lease Two. hall-duplsKes, 
with tour-bedroom, two 
bath, washer/ dryer in 
dudad. $1200/ month, no 
pets. 785-539-2357 or 

785-341-6576. 

ONE TT5"Tvrbedroom 
apartmenls and houses 
Ckise to campus 
785-539-1975 or 

785-313-8292 

ONE-BEDROOM TO l.ve- 
bedrooms Apartments, 
duplexes and homes. 
Most ck>se M campus 
Some la/ther away June 
or August leases Check 
out our website www - 
emeraldpropertymanag- 
ment.com or call EmerakI 
Property Managemem 
785-587-9000 lor more m- 
tormatkjn 

SEVEN TO sight -bedroom 
(two kitchen). June, July, 
August Alliance Prcfierty 
Management. 
7S6-S39-43S7 wwwreM- 
apmcom 

SIX. BEDROOM (TWO 
kilchen) June, July, Au- 
gust Alliance Property 
Management 
785-539-4357 www.reni- 
apm.com 

SPACIOUS FOUR-BED- 
HOOM, two balh. 
Washer' dryer, nice 
k lichen Near CKy Park. 
Available May 1 $1100/ 
month pkjs utlirtlas. 
785-313-1886 

Mil ^6UH. ml SIX 
PLUS BEDROOMS Look 
ing lor that perfect t>ome 
to rent? Oraat satocUon 
and pnces. Capslorve 
Management 
785-341-0686. 

THREE- Flve-6£0- 

ROOMS, near campus 
August lease, pets ok. 
785-776-2051 

THREE-BEDROOM 
HOUSE at 1721 Ander- 
wn. Available June 1. Un- 
lumished, oir-ilrael park- 
ing ST50 per month. Call 
KSU Foundatton at 
7le-932-7S«d or 

I 



Rent-Houses 



Saie-Housa 



TuD c nanr^ n» c FABULOUS UPDATED 

THREE -BEDROOM, ONE (our-bedroom . one and 

hjtl bath S810, 917 9kie- ^^.f,^ t,g^ ^rld* ranch 

mont, year lease, June ,,o^ Scaled west ol 

2007 • May 2008 CkMie ^gu. $149 900 Call 

to campus Pets allawed 795 539-8751 
Mrs. Kim, 913-661-9959. 



Sublease 



TWO -BED ROOM APART- 
MENT, walk to campus, 
$620.' month indudea uHll- 
lies. 785-275-1409 leave 
message 



THREE-BEDROOM 
JUNE. July. August Al- 
liance Property Manage- 
me«»l 785-539 4357 yywiy 




TWO-BEDROOMS 
JUNE. July, August Al- 
Nance Property Manage- 
ment 7B5-S39-4357 www.- 
r«nt-aom.com 

VERY CHARMING brick 
ranch. 2505 WInny Three- 
bedKiom. attached 

garage, Quiet nelgtibor- 
hoDd No pets, $950. 
June 1 tease Ryan 
Rentals, 765-313-0455. 
765-776 7706 



WILDCAT 

PROPERTY 

MANAGEMENT 

537-2332 

8'- 4 Moro 

2BR $850 

3BR $1,300 

4BR- J),700 

1 4* & Fremont 

4BR - 2'A Balh 

SI, 650 

Anderson Vtlloge 

1 BR $525 
26R - $700725 



1501 Poynti 
House - $750 
3BR 2 Bai4i 



1509Poynfi 

House - $600 

IBR' IBolh 



315Pttyntz 
1 BR - $650 

Fall Leasing 



CHRISTIAN FEMALE 

seeks two lemalo gradstu- 
denls starting tall 2007 
August to May kiase New 
lhree-t>edroom. two bath 
house with washer/ dryer 
$350 plus one -third utili- 
ties Galie47-975-14e4 

FEMALE HOUSEMATE 
No drinking/ srnoklng. 
$295/ month One-third 
utilities, washer/ dryer, Au- 
gust lease ami- 
ca313@ksu edu. 
765-537-1464 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted through July. Two- 
bedroom duplex Washer/ 
dryer, and storage Rent 
and utilities negotiable. 
Call Amanda at, 

913 216-4838 

MALE. WALK to class, all 
tumished, kiwer level, 
washer dryer without me- 
ter No smoking, drinking, 
pets. 785-539-1554 

ROOMMATE NEEDED 
until May 31. Rent $275/ 
month plus one-tourth utili- 
ties Washer/ dryer, dish- 
washer in house Call 
785-537-3737 

ROOMMATES NEEDED 
lor hiM> bedrooms in live 
bedroom house. Next tall 
Close to campus Outdcxir 
pets welcome. 
620-362-7241 

ROOMMATES NEEDED 
two bedrooms in six-bed- 
room twuse two blocks to 
Campus, three tilocks 
VIHe Call KyUe 

913-775-0465 






CONDOS FOR SALE. 

Two and three-bedroom 
stanltig at $112,650. colle- 
glatevillB.com 
76&-537-20«e 



HOUSE SEVEN minutes 
Irom campus. $200.00 par 
month. Can 
913-961-5929. 

SUBLEASER NEEDED 
tor Spring 2007 semester 
1316/ rrKinth Four-bed- 
mom apadmonl First 
month's rant pekl, ctveap 
utilities. 913-495-2556 or 
913-406-1034 

SUMMER SUBLEASE 
One-bedroom, $390 plus 
utailles Ck>se to Ag- 
gievllle, pets allowed 
913 980-5161 

SUMMER SUBLEASE 
lwo-b«droom, c(t« bMh. 
$430/ monih plua uMWm. 
766-643- 1623, 
766-577-4461 . 

t 



Hep Wanted 



Heip Wanted 



THE COUEQIAN cannot 

verify the financial poten- 
tial ol advertisements In 
the Employment/Career 
clasalflcatlon. Reader* 
are advised to approach 
any such buslnees oppor- 
tunity with rea- 
sonable cau- 
tion. The Collegian urgea 
our readers lo contad the 
Bene* Buslnaes Bureau, 
501 8E Jefferson, 
Top«u. KS 66607-1190. 
{766)232- 04S4. 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSIS- 
TANT- Netvrorka Plus, Ihe 
leader in provkling busi- 
ness computet services. 
has a fuli-tin>e pos(tk>n 
available in Manhattan, 
KS This chailenging posi- 
tion requires the atilllfy to 
handle multiple tasks and 
phoritles while maintain- 
ing a positive arxl ener- 
getic attttude. $12/ hour, 
lull-time only, opportuni- 
ties lor advancement E- 
mail resume m Microsoft 
Word or text format to: fob- 
s 9 networksplus. com . 

AS NEEDED JUVENILE 
INTAKE AND ASSESS- 
MENT OFFICER. Hilty 
County CoiTimunity Cor- 
rectlom is accepting appli- 
cations lor several as 
needed, on -call juvenile in- 
take arKi as&assment offi- 
cers MIninum require- 
ments include a high 
school dlpk>ma. Hourtj^ 
rate for call-out duty la 
$10. On-caa relmburte- 
rrvanl it $301 dUf. On-call 
offwert iMwk a rauang on- 
call schedule, with tfie 
usual schedule t>eing one 
week ol on-caN duty every 
6- 10 weeks Law entorce- 
rrtent expenencs or direcl 
experience working with 
lUvenHes is preferred. 
Valid dhver's license and 
ability M work feilble 
nours IS mandaloiy. Appe- 
catkina can ba obtaihtd 
from RBay County Clark's 
Office, 110 Courthouse 
PlaiB. Manhattan. KS 
66S02, or visit our web- 
site. www.rileyGountyks,- 
gov RHay County is an 
eQual opportunity am- 
ptoyer. 



HARVEST HELP wanted. 
Late May through August 
Pays well 765-587-1956, 
evenings. 

m £6MPaMV in „^ 

of summer workers, farm 
exfwdence needed Excel - 
lent wages. 765-564-2590 

HORTICULTURAL SER- 
VK:E5. Inc ia seeking rat- 
able, motivated mdlvktu- 
als lot tuk-ume or part- 
time seasonal poslVons in 
our retail genjen canter 
Above average wages 
oonvnensurate with sxpe- 
nence and atMrnes Appty 
In person at 11524 Land- 
scape Lane. St George. 
Kansas 785-494-2416 or 
785-776-0397 

MJA LANbfitAP? Inc 
has several posibons 
available lor our landscap- 
ing, ifTlgstion and mowing/ 
maintenance crews. This 
IS lor luH time ar^ pen 
time fielp, with llexible 
schedules tor students, 
preferably lour ttour 
bk)cks ol time Applk^ants 
must ba 18 years or age 
and have a vaM drivers li- 
cense Starting wage is 
$800/ hour Apply three 
ways. In person Monday 
through Friday at 12760 
Madison Rd In Riley, call 
765-485-2857 10 obtain 
an appllcaUon, or e-mail 
us at bQwalaodSliAnsaL- 

JOIN THE K -State Onlme 
team at the Ofhca ol Medi- 
ated Educatnn, and con- 
tributs to a variety ol Im- 
portant K-SlMa web slws 
and appNcattons. Candi- 
dates mu«t be moHvalad, 
capat>le ol learning new 
skills quickly, ssil-di- 
rected. able to work al 
least 15 hours a week, 
artd willing to devote al 
least a year to the posi- 
tion Working with web 
techrralogies In an office 
that values its students 
provkjes a fun yet chial- 
langing work environment 
Starting wages begin al 
S7 00. For rrxire informa- 
ikin emajt us at omeol- 
Ik^ei^ksu edu. 

KSU STUDENT help 
needed for working in 
greenhouse and tree pack- 
ing Four hour bkick time 
required. eOOa.m. to 12:- 
00pm or tOCp.m. lo 5:- 
OOp.m Monday through 
Fnday. $6.00/ hour Apply 
at Kansas Forest Senlce. 
2610 Clallin Rd. 

LOOKING FOR parl-tima 
help in Sctapbook store 
Monday- Wednesday- Fri- 
day daytime Expenence 
preferred Please call Sab- 
rlra 785-4 10-3 177 

LUNCHROOM/ PLAY- 
OnOUND SUPERVI- 

SORS immediate open- 
ings- Manhattan- Ogden 
eiemsntary Schools 

$6 50 per hour one and a 
half- two hours per day 
11 00 a.m.- too pm Ap- 
plk:aHon avallat>le al www - 
usd363.org/Dlstrict/Hu- 
man Resources/ or apply 
at Human Resources De- 
partment. 2031 Poyntz Av 
enue. Applications ac- 
cepted until positions are 
filled. Apply to Manhattan- 
Ogden USD 383. 2031 
Poyntz Avenue. Manhat- 
tan. KS 66502 
785-587 20O0 Equal Op- 
portuntty Employer 
MAIL CENTER, duplicat- 
ing sludenl help neeoeC 
on campus Freshman or 
sophomore status pre- 
ferred with ability lo work 
spring, surrvner, and fall 
semesters, as well as 
breaks. Duties indude: 
campus delivery route, 
preparation and handlir>g 
ol mail, arKt copy jobs 
Computer skiHs beneliclal 
and some heavy liftirtg re- 
quired Must have a valid 
dnver's license Our on 
campus office operates 
Monday- Frkiay, 8a.m.- 
5pm. and is eager to 
work around your achad- 
ute. Please apply in per- 
son at 13 College Court 
Building, Dtviswn ol Con- 
tinuing EducatKm. 
785 532-5988 

MANHATTAN COUNTRY 
Club IS seeking part-time 
bag room/ can slaff Will 
work wilh your class 
schedule Must t>e avail- 
able most weekerxjs. Call 
785-539-6221 ask lor 
Jacqua or Jeff. 

PLAY SPORTS I Have 

fun I Save moneyl Maine 

camp needs fun tovtng 

1— i I W/ 1 ll '^cihsators to teach AH 

rl I? I p Vv Cl n I fr' d '^h** - aclventu re and water 

r spons Qroat summer i 

Crtic^n I Call 686-844-8060. app^: 

campcedar.i»m 



ASSISTANT COORDINA- 

TOR: KANSAS STATE 
UNIVERSITY, New stu- 
dent servkMB Job require- 
ments bechetors degree, 
excelleni wntten and ver- 
bal communicatkin skills. 
excelleni organizational 
skills, abUlty to multi-task 
and wont ^ a fast-paced 
onvlrDnment, experience 
In event planning and oo- 
ordmatKm, demonstraled 
proficiency in multiple 
computer programs (in-i 
dudmg MS OffKe Suite). 
appHcatHe experience 
with CRM software Indud- 
ing knowtedga of data fil- 
ters The succetstui indi- 
vKtuai win be sen-moti- 
vated, have a team alii- 
tude and tw committed to 
a constituent- driven ser- 
vKe phikisophy Salary 
range ot $29,000 lo 
$34,000. Positkin avail- 
able June t. 2007. Sand 
letter of applicalnn. re- 
sume or vita and corrtact 
infDnnatk)n for three work- 
related references to 
Search Committee. KSU. 
New Student ServKes. 
122 Anderson Hall. Man- 
hattan, KS 86506 Screen- 
ing will begin March 9 and 
continue until posilion is 
inied KSU IS an Equal Op- 
portunity Employer and ac- 
tively seeks diversity 
among its empkiyees 
Paki tor by KSU 

ffANH miER ImrfJMT-' 
ate opening tor iuil-Urne 
tn>it line and/ or dnva-up 
taller, Looking lor outgo- 
ing, energetic, proles- 
s*onal. service oriented 
person Prior CMnk or 
cash handUrig experience 
Is a pkis but not required 
Forty iKiur work week. 
Great tK>urs. Great bene- 
Irts Apply at Kansas Stale 
Bank, tOtO Weslkxvp. 
Manhattan Equal Ofipor- 
tunrty Employer. 

BARTENOINQI S300 a 
day potential. No experi- 
ence necessary Training 
provided Cat 

1 -600-965-6520 exl 144. 

CAMP TAKAJO Naples, 
Makie. noted tor pic- 
turesque lakefront kxa- 
Ikin. exceptional lacitllies 
Mid- June through mid- 
August. Counsebr poai- 
tnns in tennis, baseball, 
baskeiball, soccer, 

lacrosse, goll, flag loot- 
ball, roller hockey, swim- 
ming, sailing, water skUng, 
gymnastics, dance, horse- 
back ddlng, archery, 
weight training, nawsfja- 
per. ptrotography. vMeo, 
woodworking. ceramics/ 
pottery, crafts, fine arts, 
silver leweky, copper 
enamel, nature study, ra- 
diol electronics, theater, 
coslumet, piano accompa- 
nist, must InstnjmontaF 
ist, backpacking, rock 
dimbing, canoeing/ kayak- 
ing, ropes course, secre- 
tarial, nanny. CaU Takajo 
at 666-356-2267. Submit 
appNcaUon online at 
teka^com. 

COMPLETE OUTDOORS 
Inc. seeking all posltkins 
in landscape, imgation. 
and maintenance. 

785-7761930 

DISC JOCKEY. Are you a 
people person 7 Oo you 
want to earn extra money 
while actually having Iun7 
www.kansssdisciockey.- 

com/di 

EASTER HELPnMded at 
Manhattan Town Center 
kicatkMi. Manager pay 
$455/ week. Easier Bunny 
$8.50/ hour. Call Becky 
1-600-422-8967 

fouk tANOSCAPING po- 
srtions avaJlihble Downey- 
Lawn, com kxiking lor two 
college summer interns 
that want a career rn the 
tx)rtK;ulture industry and 
two part time workers 
Housing Included Prefer- 
nng well rounded individu- 
ate with an Imaglnatkin, 
drive, and atiWty to work 
hard. Apply m parson or 
Call Nathan Downey toll 
free 1 -866-794- 

LAWN{529e) See 

DowneyLawn.com lor 
rTK>fe details Downey 
Lawn S Landscape, PO 
Box 1, 303 E. Soule lr>- 
lalls, KS 67853 





ABOVE AVERAGE COMPENSATION 

• Discounted Meats 

• Flexible Schedule 

• Crew Incentive Programs 

• Medical Insurance 

• Retirement Plan 



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at: 

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i(M)6 Anderson Ave. 

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PROGRAMMER- CtVIC- 
PIUS is the natkins laad- 
kig ptovklar ol City. 
County, and School web- 
sllsa Full-time poaHion In 
Manhattan Mkrroaolt ASP 
and SQL experience re- 
quired $15 50/ hour plus 
tirrw and a hall lor over- 
IKne. Benefits indude 
Health, Dental, Paid Holi- 
days, Pakl VkcaUon, and 
40tK matching. Email re- 
Surtie in Microsolt Wtird or 
text lonnai to fobsi^ovic- 
plus.com. 

PRBjECT iTOCram 

Clvk:Plus has an opening 
in our Manhattan head- 
quarters otiice tor a tuN- 
tlme project manager 
This challenging poswon 
entails managing multiple 
website redesign protects 
from start to finish Posi- 
tkm requires attenttcm to 
detail, the ability to man- 
age multiple tasks, pdod- 
tles and daadknes artd a 
ctteerful atttluda. Training 
is provktMJ Benefits In. 
dude health, dental, pakl 
hoMays. pakl vacatkm 
and 401 (k) matching 
Email resume in text or 
Word tormat to 

jObaScMCpki s . com . 

PROJECT MANAGER 
ClvKplus has an opening 
In Our Manhattan head- 
quarters otfk:^ for a ful- 
Ume Projed Manager 
Tlilt Chalenging positkin 
managing multiple 
idaaign projects 
from start to finish. Posi- 
tion requires altentwn to 
[letail the abillly to man- 
age multiple task, prlod- 
bes and deadlines and a 
cheertul attitude. Training 
IS provided Benefits in- 
dude Health. Dental, Pad 
Holklays, PaM Vacatkyi 
and 401 (k) matching. 
Email resume In text of 
Word fonnat to jobs IB - 
civcpius.oom. 

SEVERAL POSITIONS 
available lor IwW techni- 
bans wortting wHh greater 
pra/ne chickens m 
Kansas Ttwse positions 
are kleal lor anyone inter- 
ested in graduate school 
lor wikjhfe b)ok>gy Will be 
fitteen to thkty hours per 
week starting immedi- 
ately Pay IS $6.25 per 
hour All Interested per- 
sons please send resume 
and cover letter via e-mail 
lo gregolBj <Sksu.edu or 
can 785-532-6413. 

SO LONG Satoon now hir- 
ing waitresses. Apply xi 
person, 1130 Moro 

SUMMER INTEHNSHiP 
Help me run my business. 
Open to all mafors Five 
posltkins available, aver- 
age earns $800' week 
Call 765-3 17-0455 

TAPS LANDs4aPin6 is 
k>oking lor dependable 
sell motivated full and part 
time help Compelilive 
wages, fleiable hours 
Musi be 18 with DL Apply 
by e-msii tapsirrigabon<is- 
bcgkibai net or call 
785-539-8676, 9am-4pm 

THE CITY ot Westmore- 
land IS taking appHcabons 
lor a pool manager tot the 
2007 season. Life guard 
and WIS training pre- 
ferred but not required. 
Salary based on experi- 
ence and is negotiable 
Job dascriptMn and appk- 
catMn available at City 
Hall, PO Box 7. West- 
moreland, KS 66549, 
785-457-3361 Daadlina 
for applications Is March 
t6th. Equal Opportunity 
Empkiysr. 



8) 

Hepwanted 



TWO OPENINGS In Stu 
dent CtmfnHm Operator 
AppNcaitlons are available 
ki room 014 Hale Library 
For further inlormation. 
http : //www k- state edu/ct- 
sitomptoymenli or caH Op- 
aratkjnsst 785 532-4941 

UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY: 
Every two years MOM 
Markenng, Inc. accepts 
applk»tk>ns to fill a Mar- 
katkig & Logistics po«llk>n 
within our smoN group In 
Kansas City MOM is in a 
nk^ market ihal recov- 
ers and re- sells aH types 
of produds ttiat ate in- 
volved In derailments. 
MOW IS currently kx>king 
for a creative, motNated, 
detail-oriented person that 
has common sense, good 
ludgment, and the ability 
to communicate weR with 
new and existing cus 
tomers Prtor experience 
Is not necessary. This is a 
very good opportunity with 
a highly respected com- 
pany. Our group members 
are paid ver^ wen. Posi- 
ttor Indudes most t>sne- 
fits and requires very little 
travel II you are inter- 
ested please lonvard a 
resume as soon as possi- 
ble Our contact informa- 
Hon and more details 
about MGM may be found 
on our wetMila al www - 
mgmbuslnesapartners 
com MGM Is now 
scheduling appoinlments 
to conduct ^terviews. 

WILOCATSNEEDJOBS 
COM. PAID survey takers 
needed in Manhattan 
100°^ free to )Oki. Click on 
surveys. 

WINTER/ SPRING Poh- 
tk>ns Available Earn up to 
$150 per day Expenence 
not required. Undercover 
shoppers needed lo judge 
retail and dinkig establish 
mentsCai 800-722-4791 




COMPLETE GATEWAY 
personal computer sys 
tom Indudes cokir 
printer Good working con- 
dition $400 or beat oiler 
Mike 765-564-1040 




TVanspurtation 




SET OF oH road wheels 
and tires lor Toyota truck 
Mickey Thompson Classic 
Lock Wheels- I5it0 
Tires are Good Year 
Wrangler MT/R 31 «1 0.50 
$500 OBO 316-304-5652 




2004 YAMAHA SOOR 
Excellent condition. Beau- 
bful blue and white with 
matching helmet. Low 
miles, Yoshi Pipe, lender 
kit, cover. $5500 or best 
oiler 620-408-6442 



Pregnancy 
Testing Center 

539-3338 


su do ku 

Fill in the grid so that every row, 

every column, and every 3x3 box 

contains the digits 1 through 9 

with no repeats. 


8 

3 

1 


6 9 3 


6 

1 
8 


11 

'9' 

3 


21 9 

4 
8 5 


.41 
5' 
6 


7 
1 

2 


9 2 1 


5 

2 
7 


Solution and tips 
at www.sudoku.com 


^7u. /.'//"/■,-. I\,:li lf,i/'. Rr.lln, 
1 In* |iri-i:iMiii> li"*liin; 

1 Ittlulh tlllirilli'lltMl SITtict' 

I SniiH' iU\ ri'MiIlN • Ciill Titr ^i|i|)iiiiiliiicni 

f 1 .., .lU'.l .,^ I..n. ri.HII .llViUls III \[H|i'[^iiO S 111 ■ 

Mtiii -rn 'J ,1 m -^ p m 



Deadlines 



Clatiified ads mmt bt 
pla<*d by noon the day 
before you want your ad 
to run Claitlf lad display 

ads mutt bie plKe<l by 
4 pm Iwu working diyl 

pnor to the dale yiou 

want your ad to run. 

out 785-532-65SS 



Classified Hates 



1 DAY 

20 words Of \*a 

$10.50 

••ch word OMr 20 

itit per word 

2 DAYS 

20 words or lets 

$12.95 

each word over 20 

JSc per word 

3 DAYS 

20 wordi or leu 

$15 65 

Hth word over 10 

30t per word 

4 DAYS 

JO wonJi or less 

117.90 

each word over 20 

)5( per word 

5 DAYS 

20 words or leis 

$20.00 

each word over 20 

401 per word 

(consecutive day rait) 



To Plate An Ad 



Go to Kedtie 103 <acroti 

from the K-Stat« 

Student Union.) Office 

houn are Monday 

through Friday from 

8a.m to 5 p m 



Noiv To Pay 



All clasiifieds mutt be 
paid in advarice unleu 

you have an account 

with Student 
Publication^ Inc. Cash, 

check, MinerCard or 
Visa are accepted. 

There i» a (25 service 
charge on all returned 
chiKk* W» reserve ttie 

fight to edit, reject or 
properly classify any ad. 



Free Found Ads 



At a service to you, wc 

run found ads for three 

dayt free of charge 



Corrections 



If you find an error In 

your ad. please call ut. 

Vl/c accept responsibility 

only for the frm wrong 

insertion. 



Cancellations 



If you sell your item 

before your ad has 

expired, we wlli refund 

you for the remainirtg 

days. Vou must call us 

before noon the day 

before ttie ad ts to tie 

publiihtd. 



Headlines 



For an extra charge, 

we'll put a headline 

above your ad to catch 

the reader's attention. 



Categories 



Wj. 



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Housing Ren! Estate 




[mpioymenl Careen 




Open Market 



wm 



Tlansporlation 




Page 12 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Thursday, March 1, 2007 



Students, interns help manage, decorate 
5-year-old Aggieville clothing retailer 



By Lacay D. Utockty 

K-SUIKQUEdlitN 

Sara Strothm an -Meyer's 
trendy clothing and accessa- 
ries shop, Zotcis Attire, will 
celebrate its fifth birthday 
today, a success Strothman- 
Meyer attributes to employ- 
ees - her "girls," as she calls 
them. 

"Everything that has to do 
with the store has to do with 
the girls," she said. "If t didn't 
have them, I wouldn't be here 
today" 

Many of Strothman-Mey- 
er's employees are K- State 
students and interns from 
K-State's Department of Ap- 
parel, Textiles and Interior 
Design. 

Strothman- Meyer said she 
kept strong ties with the de- 



partment after she graduated 
from KState. 

Zotcis employees are en- 
couraged to take a hand in 
all aspects of the store, some- 
thing Strothman- Meyer said 
she did not experience in her 
own internship. 

"When I did my internship 
with |.Crew, 1 was just an as- 
sociate," she said "1 didn't 
know anything about the 
business But the girls know 
all about it." 

Employees display mer- 
chandise, help purchase 
clothes, brainstorm ideas to 
promote the store and create 
window designs 

"I give them reign on the 
entire store," Strothm an -Mey- 
er said "Honest to god, they 
do everything except balance 
the books Everything else 



the girls take care of. 

"Honest to god, I'm just 
■hocked it's already been live 
years" 

Katie Baxt, junior in hotel 
and restaurant management, 
said she enjoys working for 
Strothman-Mcyer because of 
her passion for clothes and 
her work. 

"She's just very upbeat, 
and it's a great atmosphere," 
Baxt said. 

Aimee Niemann, senior 
in apparel marketing, began 
working at Zotcis in Novem- 
ber and said the store offers 
more accessories, shoes and 
cute tops than other clothing 
shops 

She said she also appreci- 
ates the business experience. 

"You get first hand on how 
to run a business and how to 



make sure you have enough 
stuff on the floor, and how to 
help people put clothes on," 
she said 

The flexible schedule at 
Zotcis has worked well with 
Sara Johnson's schedule 
Johnson, senior in apparel 
marketing, is interning at 
Zotcis and said because she is 
married, she has appreciated 
the work environment. 

Amy Folkerts, senior in ap- 
parel marketing, has worked 
at the store for two years and 
said she loves her job and her 
boss. 

"She's awesome to work 
for," Folkerts said. "It's just a 
really fun environment. I get 
to help out with everything 
It's just very fun. I just love 
going to work" 



r^ 






_ ^ 




II 


'=s^?' 


' Mr 


r V 

1 


•■^ 








^^^^HP^^ ^ 





CMrln* Kawmm | COLLEGIDN 
Zotcti Attire cetafaratas iu fifth Urthday today. Zotcis is located at 
1203 More St. in Aggieville. 




StWMOol|C0llEGIAN 
During thair watch |>arty In Marlatt Hall, vici prasldant candidal* 
Aaron Blush and praildant candidata Dartk Ogan raspond to 

finding out they will not advance in the SGA elections. 

Ogan-Blush receive 165 votes 



By Kandra Stilas 

KANSAS ^lAIECOLWAN 

Derek Ogan and Aaron 
Blush smiled and shook their 
heads when they heard they 
would not be advancing in 
the student body presidential 
and vice- president! a I race. 

Ogan, senior in second- 
ary education, and Blush, 
sophomore in architectural 
engineering, said they weren't 
disappointed with the results, 
but were surprised they didn't 
fare better in the polls. 

"I was a little surprised," 
Blush said. "We didn't think 
we'd have quite as many votes 
u Matt (Wagner] and Lydia 
(Peele) or Jim (Mosimann) 
and Nick (Piper), but 165 - 
that's not even everybody in 
our Facebook group." 

Blush attributed the lo% 
partly to the fact the pair filed 
two weeks after the other 
candidates. 

"We were far behind be- 
cause we filed so late," he said 
"And we didn't get around to 
any of the student groups like 
the rest of the candidates. 
They had their names out for 
much longer than we did." 



Ogan said the decision to 
run was last-minute. 

"We hadn't been plan- 
ning to run all semester or 
anything like that," he said. 
"We're definitely not disap- 
pointed." 

Ogan and Blush said they 
do not know what will come 
next. Ogan said he doesn't 
have plans to participate in 
Student Governing Associa- 
tion because he will graduate 
in May 2008. Blush, however, 
is a sophomore and said he 
might try to get involved in 
the future. 

Both said they will support 
Wagner and Peele. 

"We spoke to Matt and 
Lydia and said we'd support 
them if they moved on to 
the general election and we 
didn't," Ogan said, "We'll be 
voting for them and encour- 
aging everyone who voted for 
us to vote for them" 

Blush said the pair wanted 
to thank everyone for their 
support. 

"We came in not knowing 
what to expect at all," he said. 
" But we want to thank every- 
one who took the time to vote 
for us." 



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Catrina RawMn | (QLLIGIAN 
Clara Faalay, iophomara In tpaach, and Stavan Htlburn, junior In 
chamlstry and psychology, slap hands after hearing the outcome of 
the the student body president and vice president election primaries. 

Hilburn-Feeley celebrate loss 



By Logan C. Adams 

KANSAS STAIKOLLtGIAN 

Steven Hilbum, junior in 
chemistry and psychology, 
and Clare Feeley, sophomore 
in speech, set out to fail in 
this year's election for student 
body president and vice presi- 
dent. 

They were successful. 

The pair joked and laughed 
as they listened to results 
Wednesday evening. The top 
two pairs received about 1 ,500 
votes each, the third-place 
pair had 167 and Hilbum and 
Feeley came in last, with 135 
votes. 

The two discussed throw- 
ing their support behind one 
of the pairs who will advance 
but said they would remain 
neutral for the rest of the cam- 
paign 

Hilbum seemed happy 
about the three- figure vote to- 
tal. 

"I'm going to say that we 
succeeded by getting out of the 
single digits," he said. 

The pair ran on a wide plat- 
form that included everything 
from eliminating all student 
parking except for the presi- 



dent and vice president and 
doubling textbook prices at 
the K-State Student Union 
Bookstore. The pair's positions 
were much diHerent from its' 
opponents' platforms. 

"They're probably just a bit 
more sensible than Steve and I 
are." Feeley said. 

Both said this likely would 
be their last run for student 
office. Hilbum said he prom- 
ised his mother he wouldn't 
follow such pursuits anymore, 
and Feeley said it was enough 
when she was fired from stu- 
dent council in high school. 

Feeley said Hilbum tricked 
her into running by saying she 
was entering a shufileboard 
tournament. 

"Next time I'm going to re- 
ally make sure I'm signing up 
for shuffleboard, because this 
has taken up a lot of my time, 
which 1 don't have," she said. 

The two expressed hope 
that their goals, like erecting a 
statue of K-State's mascot paid 
for by selling human organs, 
could be achieved in the pri- 
vate sector. 

"If only we could convince 
people that they needed one 
kidney," Hilbum said. 



Presented by: 

The College of 
Business 

Administration and 
Students in Free 
Enterprise 




What's your BIG idea? 

tike It on I 

EntrepreneurshipWeek USA 

Feb.24-March3,2007 

www.EntrepreneurshipWeekUSA.com 

www.cba.k-state.edu 



MOSIMANN I Candidates 
look to address more issues 



continued from Page 1 

The pair does not plan 
to spend any more money, 
Mosimann said 

Piper said it would be 
interesting to see how 
they get their messages 
out to constituents since 
the number of presidential 
candidates has been re- 
duced to two. 

"I expect a lot more 
buzz since the turnout will 
be much bigger," Mosi- 
mann said. "Somehow we 



have to be able to identify 
with all of those people." 

Both feel confident in 
their platform, Piper said. 

"Now it is just a matter 
of getting that out to the 
students as much as pos- 
sible," he said. 

Students have given 
them many ideas of issues 
on campus. 

"We are developing 
stances on those issues," 
Mosimann said. 

"I am still very happy 
with our starting four." 



WAGNER I Primary election 
winners to seek student feedback 



contlnuad from Pafe 1 

finals. 

The second pillar would 
take away the study-abroad 
application fee This would 
ensure students don't lose 
S50 before knowing wheth- 
er or not they are eligible to 
study abroad, Peele said. 

"Hie Rnancial planning 
center would be a free ser- 
vice to help students with 
their budgets Students could 
learn more about credit 
cards, taxes and other finan- 
cial issues through the cen- 
ter 

Wagner said the pair's 



platform issues will rema^ 
the same, but they might ai^ 
just the terms to fit studentt' 
needs depending on the 
feedback the pair receives 
this week. 

"1 dont think we'll neces- 
sarily change our platform 
but redefine it to be in line 
with student interests, going 
more indepth," he said. 

Peele said the time and 
effort the campaign put into 
reaching out to students 
helped them win the prima- 
ries. 

"So far, we've had tre- 
mendous support," Wagner 
said. 



FILL YOUR 

PEWS 



CALL: 

785-532-6560; 

/-^i I 1 1 A 1 1 ' A 1 1 

LOLIEGLAN 



ADVERTISE IN THE RELIGION DIRECTORY 



Entrepr^neurship Wwh USA 

Events 

The schedule of events is as 
follows, both events are set for 
Thursday, March 1, 2007: 

Entrepreneur's Product Fair 9:30 
a.m.-12:30 p.m. Courtyard Ar«« K- 
State Student Union 

Come meet successful entrepreneurs and 
discuss their product and company ideas. 

PantI Discussion 1-2:15 p.m. Little 
Thaatre, K-State Student Union 

Take part in a discussion with experts 
from a variety of areas dealing with 
Innovation and new technology 
commercialization I Panel members will 
discuss topics relevant to 
entrepreneurship today, followed by an 
audience question and answer session. 
Click here for a list of panel discussion 
participants. 

Both events era free and open to 
K-St«t« itudants and faculty and 
the general public. 



^'rt 




/^^K A N S A S STATE 

Collegian 



www.lutatecoUe^^.com 



Friday, March 2, 2007 



INSIDE 

How is image 

reaction 
improving robot 
technology? 

SwitwrNit) 




Vol, 111. No. 114 



Former U.S. president Bill Clinton to present Landon Lecture today 



By Adrisnn* D«Wmm 

KANSAS SUkTECOllEGIAN 

The 42nd U.S. president will speak 
at 3:30 p.m. today in Bramlage Coli- 
seum. 

Bill Clinton will present the 148tli 
Landon Lecture today after a ISyear 
effort to bring him to K-State. Doors 
at Bramlage will open at 2 p.m., and 
everyone is required to be seated by 
3:1S p.m. IHirking is available at 1:30 
p.m. in the east and west parking 
loU 

No bags, purses or video cameras 
will be allowed at the lecture. How- 




ever, small still cam- 
eras without flash 
are permitled, said 
)im MuUer, associ 
ate director of Ath 
letic Operations. 

Muller said 

people are advised 
to not bring cell 
phones to the lec- 
ture and to leave 
emergency pagers on vibrate. Those 
in attendance also are subfect to ran- 
dom searches. 

While admission to the lecture 
Is free, tickets and K-Statc IDs are 



Clinton 

PHEStUNI 



required upon entry Tickets are no 
longer available, said Charles Rea- 
gan, chair of the Landon Lecture Se- 
ries. 

About 5.500 total tickets were 
available for students, 1,500 for K- 
State faculty and staff, 800 for Fort 
Riley military members, 200 for K- 
State ROTC. 400 for Landon Lecture 
patrons and 500 for special guests 
like state legislators and Kansas 
Board of Regents members. 

Seating at Bramlage will accom- 
modate 9,500 people, which is the 
maximum it can accommodate for 
lectures. 



Clinton's lecture and question- 
and-answer session will be one hour 
total, Reagan said Clinton also will 
present the keynote address tonight 
at the Kansas Democratic Party's an- 
nual Washington Days celebration in 
Ibpeka 

"I think it's always important to 
listen to a president or former presi- 
dent because of the wealth of experi- 
ences they've had," Reagan said. "It's 
an awesome position to be in." 

Since his presidency, Clinton pub- 
lished his autobiography, "My Life," 

SMCllNTOHFi9t9 



Thf 14Mi Landon LKtni%' f 
pnscnttdbyffftnntr ^ 

presldtmBlliaintcm " 



i:)Jtl|i.in., today 
Wltft: tnifibgc Utseam 
Hr mon lirftnuIlM: vblt the Ua4m 
iKturt tffi«s Web tltt, wym.kautl^ 

londoo, at ^i\\niS)^m4i2^ 



TJdrft and K-State IDt are wquind i . 
entry Students, faculty and menibm af 
the oeiwral putolk can enter tftrou^h the 
normKaaMinrtlicatl entrarvcei. Small 
stiN OfMOS m pcrmmed, but Hcutitv 
will allow nc bags oi punn of any km. 





Area restaurants prepare to provide menu alternatives for Lent season 



By Kcndra Sttln 

KANSAiSWtCOLUGIAN 

The Lenten season started Feb. 21, and area 
restaurants already are prepared for the effect it 
will have on business 

Lent is a Catholic celebration from Ash 
Wednesday to Easter Sunday in which Catholics 
abstain from eatitig meat ~ not including fish - 
on Fridays. The Rev. Keith Weber of St. Isidore's 
Catholic Student Center said the season lasts 40 
days, which is symbolic of jesus' time fasting in 
the desert 

"That's part of what Lent is for us,' Weber said 
"It's essentially a 40-day retreat leading up tu the 
celebration of the resurrection of Christ." 

Abstaining from meat is part of the church's 
communal penance, he said, but members are en 



couraged to do individual penances and give up 
other things during the season 

"Individual penances focus on something that 
stands in the way of our personal relationships 
with God," Weber said "Most people usually give 
up something else and pray for help with it." 

Gina Koester, senior in architectural engineer- 
ing, said Lent is a lime for Catholics to make sac- 
rihces of their own 

"Giving up meat is a sacrificial thing because 
we're giving up something we desire,"' Koester 
said "l("s giving something up for God." 

She said it was easy to avoid eating meat for 
one day of the week, but the closing of Long John 
Silver's dampened her spirits 

"'It doesnl really matter most of the time," 
Koester said. "It's usually pretty easy to be a veg- 
etarian lor a couple of days, but it was always a 



tradition to go to Long John Silver's on Friday 
nights, so now that it's closed, it's kind of sad." 

Brad Streeter, manager of Vista Drivc-ln Inc., 
made four additions to the menu for the Lenten 
season, though he said his business typically is 
not affected by the abstention from meat. 

"Lent usually doesn't make that much of an 
impact on business," Streeter said. "We've made 
changes in the past, but thi^ is the first year we've 
made this many additions to the menu." 

He said he hopes having one less seafood rra- 
taurant in Manhattan will help his business dur- 
ing Lent. 

"We've just added four seafood specialties 
specifically for the Lenten season," Streeter said. 
"Long John Silver's has been closed (or about 

SecLENTPigtS 



Enrollment down 
from past years 



ByWandyHaun 

KANSAS STATE COIUOIAN 



Enrollment at K-Statc decreased 
by 297 this spring, a 1.4-percent 
decrease, which is the most of the 
Kansas regents schools, according 
to a Feb. 23 Topeka Capital-Journal 
article. 

The spring enrollment for both 
of K- State's campuses was 20,747, 
including the 434 students enrolled 
in the College of Veterinary 
Medicine. Pat Bosco, dean of 
student life, said Fort Riley factored 
into the decline in students, 

"We're probably affected more by 
enrollments in the spring because 
of Fort Riley," he said, "Right no\v. 
it's a difficuh time for our students 
and familiet. 

"Enrollment will be back up 
in the fall, when the international 
situation becomes more stable" 

Fort Hays State University had 
the highest increase in enrollment, 
adding 582 students this semester 
for an 8.3-percent increase. 

Emporia State University had 
its highest spring enrollment since 
1972, enrolling 97 more students 
The University of Kansas recorded 
a decline in enrollments, showing a 
4 -percent decline. 

Bosco said the administration 
will continue to promote K-State, 
and it feels the decline in enrollment 
is negligible. 

"We're working 24/7 as we 
always have been to make sure that 
prospective students know about our 
academic programs and the quality 
of student life," he said. "Spring 
enrollment doesn't determine our 
budget for the upcoming year or our 
position in the state Those things 
are predicated by fall enrollments'" 



AggievJlle Webcams show events, fun times, crimes 



By willow Wllltamson 

KANSAS STATE COLUGIAN 

The world is watching Aggieville, 
so watch out. 

Six Webcams, video cameras that 
transmit content to viewers on the 
Internet, are located at different parts 
of "The 'Ville" The videos feed direct- 
ly to www.aggievillelive.com, a Web 
site set up by Jeff Levin, co-owner of 
Vamp's Book Store, and two of the 
store's information technologists. 

"Aggieville is an icon to K-Staters 
worldwide," Levin said. "Aggieville is 
alive, and so Aggievillelive is about 
the fact that this is a real fun area to 
beat." 



The idea behind the cameras is to 
record special events in Aggieville, 
such as the New Year's festivities or 
St, Patrick "s Day parade, he said He 
said he hopes eventually to add audio 
so bands performing at the bars can 
be recorded. 

One camera is attached to the 
Vamey's marquee, looking west 
down Moro Street. Two are on the 
south comer of Vamey's looking into 
the parking lot Two are on top of 
Ballard"s Sporting Goods looking up 
and down Moro Street, and one is lo- 
cated inside Kite's Bar & Grill. 

In addition to recording the go- 
ingson at the bars, the cameras also 
have helped solve and reduce crime 



in the area Cameras caught one per- 
son painting graffiti on a building, 
and the video will help with the con- 
viction, Levin said. 

"There have been some as- 
saults down here," he said. "Since 
we've installed (the cameras), that's 
dropped." 

Some uf the crimes are of a more 
comical nature. 

"We're saving some of the fun 
things that have happened, or what I 
would call America's dumbest crimi- 
nals,"' Levin said 

He calls one recording "Little Boy 
Poo." 

See WEBCAM P99t 9 




Smvm [Ml I (OiKGiAN 

A Wvbcsm on the Vamty's m«rqu*« looks down Moro Street Thursday evening 
and broadcasts its recordings to www.aggxvfllelivexom. The camefi is on* of six in 
Aggieville that show what is going on in the district. 



fnjrjrrn Today's forecast 
fwr//// Partly doudy /Windy 
High: 45 Low: 24 



mp 



INSIDE 



When not jim^rlm) outuhnultzy'awwws* 
a the heart -wamiinq dad on""Fiill House," Bob 
S49et tus a reputation for t)elng a little more ris- 
que. Now, the (omk Is moving on to qimt shows. 

SMitofyPattU 



CAMPUS NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 



Percussion and piano 
duo to show at Union 

Anthonjr Oi Sanza, former 
director of percussion studies 
at K Slate, and pianist Jessica 
Johnson will perform "Sole 
Nero,' i piano and percussion 
duo 41 }:}0 p.m. In forum Hall. 
Admission Is free to the public. It 
Is sponsored by K-State's Student 
Governing Association. 



Beach museum 

to dose for renovations 

The Beach Museum of An 
will close March U to April 
} while changes are made to 
the entry way. Early childhood 
worltshops will continue as 
scheduled, and the museum will 
resume its regular hours April 4. 
The museum Is scheduled to be 
completed In May. 



Expo allows Students 
to meet employee 

A deslgrt expo, su|iported by the 
College of Architecture, Planning 
and Design, wilt allow students 
lonfeetwilh architecture and 
design professionals from across . 
the country from 10 a.m. to 3 
p,m today In the K State Student 
Union Ballnwm, Students nuy also 
inquire about career opportunities. 



C£A alAtf^iAn 1 AnccMCiifcgtoniMlMptllislKdnadtntodioose 
9Ufl eteillOn \ ^ ,f^ ^^fum bw in the campus electtons. 


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14% 




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flniiKMiMnhrftiiden6 


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Ihiipcl isMi tdMit MdirfK^Atofifiimiat my envMmti 


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Y 



Page 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, March 2, 2007 



Cfaftin ^oeiti and t2»^i*i 



1814 aaOtn Rii. 
www clatlinbooks.com 



k 



Fax 



(785) r76-377J 
(785) 776-1009 



Puzzles I Eugene Sheffer 



ACROSS 

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t "Eurehat" 

9 Hot tub 
12Uppttv 

one 
13 Stewart or 

Serling 
U Wrestling 

surfacs 

15 Worship 

16 Bart>ecue 
ia Chess 

p<«ca 
20t4eighbor 

of Tex. 
21 Boswell's 

wrile-up, 

bnefty 
13 Dundee 

dental 

24 TalK a 
l>lue 
streak? 

25 Respon- 
si billy 

27 Steel- 
head, eg. 

29 Skirmish 

31 Just 
took 

35 Oak-, 
Tenn 

37 Near 
the 
target 

3« Debate 
subject 



41 Simile 
center 

43 Section 
ol 
LA.? 

44 Singer 
Campbell 

45 The 
answer 
man? 

477ac1k: 
against 
32-Oown 

49 Unlnendfy 

52 Mel ot 
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53 Honest 
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54 Steam 
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55 Cries ol 
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SS Roofing 

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DOWN 

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6 Sagittar- 
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7 Owl's call 
6 Commo- 

lion 
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decisively 

10 Cohort of 
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and 
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11 0<l ol 
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Solution time: 25 mint. 



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Obse- 
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an apple? 

22 — pickle 
24 South of 

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style 

partr\er 
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method 

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toss 
setMome 
dome 
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39 Laziness 

40 Oenomi- 
r\ations 

42 Humiliate 

45 Brass 
instrument 

46 Verve 
48 Feedbag 

morsel 

50 Indivvsible 

51 Distant 



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PAORQ IPQQXCR^' OH CRAXPE 

L Z V A O X R Y r D R Z E H M Q R V P F E V 

f K ? L R Q H K C A R y O . 

Vesl*rdav\t"r}ptoquip: IF'^OH INSTALL SOME 
FACING ON A Bl ILDING WITH SOMEBODY 
ELSE. COULD YOli BE SIDING WITH HIM.' 
Today's CrvtHixiuin Clue: D L-uuiils W 



BEST BETS 



Your social calendar for the weekend 




Feature film: "Inherit the Wind" 



8 p.m. little ThMtte' 
Admission: $1 

BasedanareiMlfetrlalin192S, 
two legendary Uwi^rs argue the 
Hit fof ind against a science 
leather accused of the crime of 
leaching evolution. 

'Uovif also shows 7 p.m. and 9:10 
p.m. Saturday and S p.m. Stjnda)^. 
Admission is $1. 



UPC After Hours: "Comedian Arvin 
Mitchell" 

8-11 p.m. K- State Student Union Ccwrtyard 
Admission: Free 

The show will feature ittusic artists Stephen Pile at 8 p.m 
and Kelly McCarty at 9 p.m. Arvin Mitchell will perlonrv at 
10 p.m. Your best bet is to get there early, because there's 
free pizia for the first 200 people. 





At the theater: "Proof 

7:}0 p.m. Manhat- 
tan Arts Center* 
Admission: SlOfor 
students 

A mad 

mathematical 
genius, a daughter 
who might have 
inherited her father's genius or his madness and a desper- 
ate graduate student out to make a name for himself, 
perhaps by stealing his mentor's notebooh or making 
love to his mentor's daughter— all of the ingredients fcir a 
great night of theater 

'This play also will be performed SatunJay and Sunday. 
For show times and further information, call (785) 517- 
4420. Or visit their Web site at MrMrMr.mon/iafranorts.o/g. 

Local musical performances 

See bands The Canvas. Catfish Whiskey and Pajur u Cabbage 
at )0 p.m. at Pi's Bar in Aggieville. Corkscrew Soar and 
Crazy Talk will perform at 10 pm at Auntie Mae's Parlor 



3 Saturday 



K-State men's basiietball 
vs. Oklahoma 

2:)0p.m.atBramlage 

Shown on f o« Sports Network 

The Wildcats play the last game to hnish the regular 
season against the Sooners Saturday. Five seniors will be 
honored in their last game at Bramlage Coliseum. 

Red State Blues Band 

9:30 p.m. Bobby T's, Candlewood Shopping Centei 
Admission: $3 

What started as an inlonnal jam session between seven 
K- State faculty members has grown into what the band 
likes to call 'the best damn blues band west of the Big 
Blue River." If you like bluegrass and jazz, you're bound to 
have a good time. 



4 Sunday 



Spring deaning 

Smte the weather ha srt tjuite letHfd into spring i1^ prob- 
ably too soon to pack away your wintet wardrobe However, 
if s not too soon to start focusing on spmcng up other 
househokl areas 



If yoci^a pack rat its easy to become 
overwhelmed at the thought of going 
through every little pile throughout 
your house Here's a few tips on how 
to get started without feeling m over 
your head. 



idlL 



■ father up winter sponing gear and padc it away 

■ Limil yocisetf to 10 minutes every day to tadtle projects 
so you dont end up sorting junk mail for four hours arid then 
getting burnt out 

■ Go through your bathroom toiletnes and thmw away 
wrftat you haven't used in more than s« monltts. Chances are 
pudon'l really need them. 



The planner 

Campus bulletin board 



■Tht Graduate Rcscardi Forum will talc place from 
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. today on the second floor o( the K-State 
Student Union. 



Items in the calendar can be published up to three times. To place 
an item in the Campus Calendar, stop by Kedzie 1 16 and htl out a 
form or e-mail the news editor at colltgmii'Spubhii.fdii by 1 1 
a.m. two days before it is to run. 



The blotter 

Arrests In Riley County 

The Collegian takes i^^Dorts diRCtfy llvinihe 
Riley C«m^ Poke OepartmenRdilly logi 
TheColniMidoanMlH«rti«lbtaornilnar 
traffic vicMiDni because ofipaacMistiiMs. 

Wednesday,, FtbL28 

I 

■OasMIMtti Smith, Council Grm,Kan„il ; 

7dOa.m. for bdufe to appear. Bond was $306. < 
■HHttMTltawnkynmJmSloaaSt, < 
at8:30amforpossessionafnielhamphft' ! 
amine, possessjon of a controlled substance, 
possession of marlluana, one Wonycoum of ; 
pouessionofdntgparaphefnalia.andone i 
misdemeanor count of possession of ditig 
pmphemalia. Bond was SS.dOa 

■ Stwtn Patrtd KHnfikdi, «n RHey Lant, 
Apt 2, at 1:40 pm. for two counts of probitian 
violation Bond was 53,500. 

■ Gre9ory Todd Barrifcr, Junction Qty, at 
2*2 p.m. for battery. Bond was S1,S00. 

■ JodMM lynn htfram, Gatesvilie, Texas, 
at 2:20 pm. fordrrving with a sifipended or 
cancelled license Bond was S500, 

■ Chilstopher B. Sihn, Alma, Kan., it B J3 
pm. for dnvir^g undet the inffuenceandfteeing 
Of attetnpting to elude. Bond was $14X10. 

WedneMlay,Manti1 

■ Jiah Mandba Jamila ShaUn, Junoion 
City, at U:37a.m. for dtsonietlycondua Bond 
was y SO. 

■ GamaHel FivKO Jr., Sallna, Kan, at 1 
a.m. Ibi driving with a suspended or cancelled 
license and dnving under the influence. Bond 
wasS2,2S0, 

■ Aftci LyiMttC Tbnms, Junaion City, at 1 :34 
a.m. for battery and obstruction of the iegal 
process. Bond was SIOOO. 

■ Christopher («f«y Bas, IIDO Thurston 
St^ at 2: IS a.m. ibr disorderly conduct Bond 
wasS7S0. 

■ Cody Uan Peratt, 221 5 College Ave., at 
2:1S a.nu for disotdetly condua Bond wis 
S7M. 



Corrections and 
clarifications 

There was an error m Thursday's Collegian. 
Crossroads of (CM 5 located at 1021 Denkon 
Ave. Ttse Collegun regrets the error. 14 ynuoe 
somethmg that should be conected, c^l news 
editor Alex Peal[ at (785) 532-6S5« ore-mail 
wSegian^iputiksu.edii. 



Kansas State CoNegian 

(USPS 291 020) The Kansas Sute Collegian, a 
student newspaper at Kansas State (Jnrwrsity, 
is published by Student Publications Inc, 
Kedfle 103, Manhattan, KS 66506. The Col- 
legian IS published weekdays during the scfwol 
year and on Wednesdays during the sumrtier. 
Midical postage is paid at Manhattan, KS 
66502. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to 
Kansas 5t^e Collegian, circulation desk, Kedzie 
103, Manhattan, K5 66506-7167. 
O Kansas State Collegian, 2007 



537-7701 A 



1 109 Hytton Heights 
Manhattan. KS 66S02 



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Friday, March 2, 2007 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGfAN 



Page 3 




Senate introduces resolution 
in support of bio, ag facility 



Pholo llluttrvllon by St*v*n Doll | iOlKGIAN 
Uitcr LoscKky, atflftant profviMr (n psychology, it rMHrchlng visual recognition. His study Involves 
how Images are understood and how they affect the brain. 

Research shows'gisf of images 



By willow WllianiMn 

Imt like oim tan get the gist 
of a story or a iiiovic, one also 
can ^et Ihe gist of an image or a 
scene, 

Lester I^oschky. assistant 
professor in psychology, is re- 
searching how humans get the 
"^st" of an image and how that 
can affect 1\k brain. 

The research has the poten- 
tial to help create new ijiiage- 
retrieving .systems for the Inter 
net build siiiurler robots and 
improve eyewitness accounts of 
crijTies. 

When an image flashes in 
front of someone for a split see 
ond. the brain can figure out the 
general idea of what was seen, 
fur example, a kitchen, a forest 
ur a swinuning pool, he said. 

"You can look at the real 
world or a picture and rapidly 
you can get the gist." Loschky 
said. 

However, if liie image does 
not make logical sense, il takes 
the brain much longer to under- 
stand the image For instance, if 
one sees a church and a football 
player, it will be harder fur the 
brain to understand the image 
because one dues not usually 



associate football players in full 
gear with church. 

"This is probably the first 
meaningful stage of perception." 
Loschky said 

Recognizing the overall im- 
age helps one associate tlie 
objects within the image and 
where those objects should be, 
he said. For example, if people 
see a football held, they know 
the object in the frame probably 
is a football player or a cheer- 
leader. 

When asked to look for a 
football player, the brain knows 
to took to the field and not to 
the stands or in Ihe sky Howev- 
er, it takes the brain much lon- 
ger to recognize an object that 
does not fit with the image, 

Loschky compared this stage 
of percept k»n to reading 

"U is. easier to recognize a 
letter in a word than by itself, 
and easier to recognize a word 
in a sentence than by itself," he 
said. 

But if the word or the sen- 
tence does not make sense, the 
ease is gone 

Getting the gist of an image 
also can affect the "reconstruc- 
tive nature of memory," he said. 

The brain sonietimes will in- 
sert falsities mlo the memory. 



For example, in one study, 
people were asked to wait in an 
office for about one minute un- 
til an experiment was ready for 
them 

The office they waited in 
contained no books or pens; 
however, when later asked to 
recall what was in the office, 
most of the people said they 
saw books and pens. Utis is be- 
cause the brain was inserting its 
understanding of an office into 
their memories. 

This has real world applica- 
tions. For example, if someone 
were to witness a crime, it is 
possible that because of the re- 
constructive aspect of memory, 
the witness' brain could utilize 
false memories, Loschky said. 

One other application of his 
research is creating a new way 
to retrieve iniages from the In- 
ternet The Google search en- 
gine finds an image by searching 
for a specific key word, TVpe in 
"beach." and it will bring up ev- 
ery image containing the word. 
However, it will not bring up 
pictures of beaches with titles 
like ocean, sand or cove. 

"It's limited only to those im- 
ages that have been named by 
a person using that word," he 
said. 



By Adriwirw DttWMM 

KAKASSTAItCOllEGIM 

Student Senate members 
intnxluced a resolution in sup- 
port of a $450 million National 
Bio- and Agrxj- Defense Facility 
in Manhattan at their meeting 
Thursday night- 

Tbc city of Manhattan 
pledged $5 million in economic 
a^istance to the facility, which 
the US Department of Home- 
laitd Security would fund. TTie 
facility could bring $3.5 billion 
to the local economy during its 
firet 20 years, according to the 
proposed resolution 

Senate members will lake 
final action on the resolution 
at their next meeting Facility 



tsisk force members are look- 
ing for community support, 
said Clint Blaes, College of Ag 
riculture senator and an origi- 
nal author of the mtolution. 

The University Relations 
Committee met after Senate's 
general mec*ting to plan action 
on the online textbook list pro- 
posal resolution Senate voted 
26-18-0 to send the resolution 
back to the University Rela- 
tions Committee at the Feb 22 
Senate meeting 

"The proposal is changing 
in intent," said Melissa Hil- 
dcbrand. committee chair and 
senior in agricultural journal- 
ism and communications "We 
found that we have a better 
oppoitun% to focus on the 



system and how we can help 
Vamey's (Bookstore) increase 
accountability for professors, 
increase the buy back cycle 
and lower textbook prices for 
students in the long run" 

Prior to the meeting, Uni- 
versity Relations Committee 
members met with Steve and 
Jeff Levin, co-owners of Var- 
ney's; Pat Bosco, dean of stu- 
dent life; and Beth Unger, vice 
provost for academic services 
and technology, and discussed 
changes to the committee's 
onginal proposal (or an inter- 
nal textbook listing. 

"I think (Thursday's) meet- 
ing lold us this is going to hap- 
pen no matter what.' Hildeb- 
rand said. 



K-State offers classes at Fort Riley 



ty HwMMh Cripptn 

K*WA&SIAt([<HLEGlAN 

K-State is offering four 
spring classes at the main post 
at Fort Riley. 

Culture and conflict, vio- 
lence prevention and interven- 
tion, introduction to women's 
studies, and introduction to 
American ethnic studies can 
be taken for undergraduate 
credit on post at Fort Riley 

Culture and conflict and 
violence prevention and inter- 
vention also may be taken for 
graduate credit for the Conflict 
Resolution certificate 

Introduction to women's 
studies and introduction to 
American ethnic studies are 
being offered through video- 
conferencing. 

Melinda Sinn, public infor- 
mation coordinator of continu- 



ing education, said this meatu 
classes are taught on campus 
and delivered through technol- 
ogy to the post. 

TELENET 2 is a videocon 
ference network K-Slate uses 
to conned to Fort Riley stu 
dents. 

Sue White. Kansas Regents 
Network and TELENET 2 co- 
ordinator, said this technology 
allows classes to meet at the 
same time frum different lo- 
cations. It is a live cormection 
where students can see and 
hear what is happening in the 
other classroom. The instruc- 
tor would be in Dole Hall. 

Brian Blick, sophomore in 
pre-professional business ad- 
ministration, took introduc 
tion to American etftnic Ssud- 
ies in fall 2005. He said he 
would recommend the course 
to other students. 



"It ^ves you almost a de- 
scription of all different kinds 
of races," Blick said, "It gives 
you insight to other cultures, 
and most of the people I've 
grown up with and hang out 
with are white." 

Blick also said he learned 
how other cultures interact 
with each other and how to 
interact with other cultures. 

Sinn said students should 
talk to their advisers to see if 
these couises meet their cur- 
riculum needs. 

"If they don't have an ad- 
viser, they may speak with 
Ruth Stajiley, a K-State repre- 
sentative on post, to see if the 
classes meet their academic 
needs." Sirm said. 

The courses are open to all 
students. Students can enroll 
ortline at www.dce.ksu.edu/ 
courses. 



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•*♦.. — . 




OPINION 



Page 4 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, March 2, 2007 




Pregnancy crisis 

Oinics that promote specific agendas aren't truly helping 




Morality aside, abortions happen 
safely every day in the United States. 

A recent Time magazine cover 
story told of a 
budding preg- 
nancy care clinic 
in North Carolina 
that clainu to give 
non- judgmental, 
"loving support." 
In other words, 
the only type of 
support it really 

offers is the baby- 

bearing kind. 

I have a beef with this strategy, 
because guilt isn't a fair tactic. Even 
the subhead on the cover of Time 
suggests the clinic's strategy is par- 
tial: "Crisis pregnancy centers are 
working to win over one woman at 
a time. But are they playing fair?" 

The clinic is said to have new 
facilities and caring people who are 
willing to help, but it also dishes out 
plenty of its shaded agenda. 

Regardless of whether a woman 
views abortion as right or wrong, 
shouldn't she be given objective 
information upon entering a crisis 
center? Especially if the health cen- 
ter touts itself as non-judgmental. 

According to the Time article, 
not only do workers at the clinic 
And a way to bring religion into 
their counseling {as many of these 
centers are religiously affiliated), 
they also often hand out baby boo- 
ties to women upon learning of their 
pregnancies, not to mention the life- 
size fetus models at each stage of 
development brought out in "a black 



velvet box that looks as if it holds a 
string of pearls." 

Are the clinics' means effec- 
tive? Unfortunately, yes. They use 
guilt and skewed data to persuade 
confused and frantic women into 
skipping abortions. They even go as 
far as asking women what name to 
put on their ultrasound photos for 
their future baby books. 

Many of these women already 
face difficult decisions, and they 
don't need the added burden of 
clinic workers (or rather, mission- 
aries) pushing a moral agenda of 
damnation and death. 

Though these score tactics proba- 
bly boost (he success rate for clinics' 
anti-abortion agendas, it's not fair to 
women who are looking for facts on 
which to base their decisions. 

Whether they choose to carry 
their pregnancy to term or not, all 
women deserve an objective voice, 
which the clinic workers claim to 
have 

When people are considering any 
other type of medical procedure, 
they generally explore all sides and 
talk to more than one doctor before 
making a decision They should not 
be given incorrect information and 
swayed through guilt. 

Other pregnancy clinics similar 
to this one are said to go as far as 
showing gory abortion pictures 
or films. Often times, women are 
warned of breast cancer or death 
from abortion, according to the 
article. 

Time cites the Guttmacher Insti- 
tute, saying, "fewer than 3 percent 



of (abortion) patients experience 
a complication serious enough to 
require hospitalization." According 
to U.S. National Cancer Institute, 
"induced abortion is not associated 
with an increase in breast cancer 
risk." 

Why don't clinics hke these show 
accounts of the thousands of women 
who have had successful abortions? 
Why is it hardly mentioned that 
many women feel no side effects and 
can live completely normal, pain- 
free lives afterward? These women 
always seem to be forgotten in the 
abortion debate. 

I think it is unlikely an employee 
of Planned Parenthood would take 
great offense if a patient seeking an 
abortion decided to continue her 
pregnancy. But, it is easy to imag- 
ine the case would be different for 
someone who visited a clinic where 
ultrasounds are named and decided 
to continue with her abortion 

At a clinic concerned with giving 
a woman information and encourag- 
ing her to make her own decision. 
without bias, patients wouldn't have 
to undergo this sort of psychological 
warfare, traumatizing what already 
is a tough situation. 

Kudos to those pregnancy crisis 
centers who give women all of the 
information objectively, regardless 
of which decision the patients ulti- 
mately make. 



Mn Nik i) « teni»r iti matt tommunlcatiani. 
Pltaic wnd commentt t« apMMiiitpiib.i«i. 
trfit. 



U.S. government citizens leaving Iraq veterans out to dry 




As our military ventures con- 
tinue to deteriorate abroad and 
the pathetic treatment of returning 
veterans at home 
proceeds, some are 
beginning to won- 
der if our military 
isn't on the verge 
of large-scale up- 
heaval. 

Speaking 
from experience, 
military units 
are held together ' ~ 

solely though cohesion from top to 
bottom - from squad to platoon to 
company, all the way down to the 
distinction of military from "ciwie," 
When these bonds deteriorate at the 
highest level, the effects do not stop 
there, they ripple downward 

If soldiers and marines begin 
to feel they do not matter to the 
higher-ups or the schmuck on the 



JONAS 
HOCC 



street, they will stop to wonder why, 
exactly, they are risking their lives 
10.000 miles from anything 

When a soldier runs into fire to 
retrieve a critically injured friend 
and later discovers his friend is 
being kept in the moldy, rat- and 
cockroach -infested buildings at 
Walter Reed Army Medical Center 
in Washington, DC, he feels an 
understandable sense of betrayal 

On March 1 . the Washington 
Post reported officials at Walter 
Reed have ignored family members, 
veterans groups and members of 
Congress for years The "shock and 
awe" expressed when these findings 
were made public now is exposed as 
cynicism and ass-cuvering. This af- 
fects the people on the ground, too 

For those with friends and loved 
ones, or themselves, stuck at the 
military's premier hospital, the mes- 
sage is clear - neither the military. 



the public nor Congress has cared 
enough for the past three years to 
take action Was it foreseeable, just 
maybe, that having two large mili- 
tary campaigns operating concur- 
rently would require good medical 
facilities'' 

The military's lockstep, brain- 
dead response has been to ban 
patients at Walter Reed's Medical 
Hold Unit from communicating 
with the press and to impose daily 
barracks inspections. As anyone 
from the military can attest, manda- 
tory daily inspections after basic 
training are almost entirely a form 
of punishment. 

By now, most of us have seen the 
newly famous picture of a dry erase 
board bearing the mantra "America 
is not at war The Marine Corps is 
at war; America is at the mall " As 
this attitude spreads - and only the 
most desk-bound administrative 



leaders believe it won't - we will 
begin lo see bitterness and hatred 
form in the hearts of America's 
defenders. 

Years from now, once the 
chorus for withdrawal h-om Iraq is 
ended, once (he yellow ribbons are 
taken down, once the "support the 
troops" bumper stickers are con- 
signed to the junkyard, the veterans 
of the war are going to wonder 
where their grateful nation went, 
and perhaps won't be able to find 
an answer. 

If we stay in Iraq and Afghani- 
stan those countries likely will 
revert to patriarchal, authoritarian 
regimes - If we leave, they most 
certainly will. In five, 10, 15 years, 
when the latest round of dictators is 
parading in from of the television, 
will we want to tell the widows, the 
orphans, the horribly maimed their 
sacrifice changed nothing? 



Even now. Veteran's Administra- 
tion programs are cut, funding for 
military housing is cut and medi- 
cal programs are cut. Beleaguered 
military members come home, find 
their children another year older 
and themselves at the bottom of the 
list 

Soon, Americans will have to 
come face-to-face with the people 
who carry out our nation's direc- 
tives - the tired, worn-out and 
embittered who have shouldered 
the weight of American nationalism 
- and they will have some things to 
say to us. 

Like so many of our warriors 
of the past, they might find no one 
listening. 



Jenut Hogs li* i«niorln iMtelofif, Inttmttion 
il itudift *nd RuitJan. f\ta%t trad tommciiti 
to opMtiinpub.kiu.tdu 



K Collegian 



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Courtn«y Sl*yp«n | U IUNM£> 



WRITE TO US 

Lrtim tan be iubminwl by »-rmil to Xntr^ 
fpabhutdu. m irt person to Kcd;it 1 16 fkut 
indudf inur full ntmt, ytn m school and major 
lettm Orauld be llmitrd m 2S0 mfdt All 
tubmlttfd IrttMS may bt editrd for length and 
dartiy. 



CONTAaUS 

Kantit State Cottcqian 

IMd* 193 Manlwttwi, KS 66»1 

DnpUyads. (7gS) S)2-«560 

Clasufi(dadL...(7eS)S32-6SSS 

mmf. (785) SJi-dSSS 

NfWSiDom. (785)532-6556 

news0spubJau.e^ 



TO THE POINT I ^"^'^^ ™"*^ '* *" editorial selected and debated by the editorial board and written after a majority 
I W 1 1 iU I will I I opinion it formed. This is the Collegian's official opinion. 

Lent a time for renewal, even for non-Christians 



Medieval Chinstians gave 
up all animal products to 
observe Lent. Earlier ascetics 
nearly gave up eating alto- 
gether during the period. 

In the nine days since the 
beginning of Lent, many 
K- State students have given 
up such fundamental necessi- 
ties as Facebook.com, Star- 
"bucks, or their iPods - true 
sacrifices, indeed 

In a time when even the 
nation's poor are obese and 
our collective cup runneth 
over, it is easy to overlook the 
need to deprive oneself. 

Forty-one percent of 
Americans said they have 
observed Lent by making 
changes in their personal life- 
styles, according to a survey 
by Scripps Howard News 
Service and Ohio Universi^. 



However, many of those 
people know nothing of the 
meaning and the history 
behind the sacred event 
Perhaps more important than 
simply depriving oneself a 
pleasure is observing one of 
the other two tenets of Lent: 
prayer and almsgiving Lent is 
not intended as a purely self- 
centered event; it should also 
be a time to learn more about 
one's faith and give back to 
the commimity. 

But even for non-Chris- 
tians, Lent can be a time of 
growth and renewal, spiritu- 
ally or otherwise. The event's 
timing, at the approximate 
end of winter each year, lends 
itself to a "spring cleaning" of 
sorts. And because others are 
fasting or sacrificing certain 
things during the same pe- 



riod, a person might be more 
likely to feel support in taking 
on such an endeavor. 

Many people do not un- 
derstand why someone wotild 
give up a thing that gives 
them pleasure imless they 
had a reason as good as a 
resurrected Messiah 

But Pope John Paul II 
said there is joy in the deep 
spiritual work that makes it 
possible to find oneself again. 
He said we often see the need 
for intellectual and physical 
effort, but not for spiritual ef- 
fort. 

"The whole period of Lent 
. . is a systematic call to this 
joy that comes from the effort 
of patiently finding oneself 
again," he said. "Let no one 
be afraid to imdertake this 
effort." 



THE FORUM 

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V >'■••' 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Pages 



FROMTHEPRESIDEKT 

Administration considers Webmail switch 



All K-Staiers share 
something in common. No, 
it's not a love for attending 
K-State spom, nor is 
it an inherent dislike 
for 7:30 am classes, 
[liitead, the most 
common denomi- 
nator we all share 
is a K-State e-mail 
address 

We all might have 
htd Yahoal and 
Hotmail accounts ~~ 
in high school, but now we 
all have a Webmail address 
as well. Webmai), however, 
is not a perfect system. Our 




LUCAS 
MADDY 



having an outside provider 
like Google coordinate and 
manage our university e-mati 
system. Administra- 
tors are interested in 
student opinions, so 
what better place to 
ask for student feed- 
back than right here 
on the opinion page? 

Do you like Web- 
mail? Do you hate 
it? What would you 
~~ ~ change? 

Would you support out- 
sourcing our e-mail? Send 
your comments to maddy® 
ksu.edu or Kansa&jcoun- 



^ itjjiMU State TOivSwY^P 






administration is looking at try@msn.com. Your input 



will help our administration 
make the best possible deci- 
sion for K-Stale. 

Finally, be sure and 
vote in the general elec- 
tions Monday and IXiesday 
of next week. Our vote is 
our chance to make sure 
our voices are heard, so get 
informed and vote. 

LttUi Middy 

STUDENT BODY PRtSINNT 



TO THE EDITOR 



Racism comments display cultural ignorance 



WORLD NEWS 



Editor, 

There was an article 
printed Feb. 28, 2007. "Panel 
answers race questions from 
students " On the Collegian 
Web site, there have been 
comments submitted that 
we feel should be addressed 
One comment in particular 
really shows the ignorance 
ah'd lack of cultural sensitiv- 
ity in our society. 

" Lei's have a panel 
of white men to discuss 
stereotypes towards us Race 
wouldn't be such an issue if 
it was not always discussed. 
When will we . move on 



and quit whining and talking 
about how rough we have ^ 
it and make it happen for 
ourselves?" 

We believe your criticisms 
are unwarranted and un- 
educated. The very concept 
of race and racism is much 
deeper than the words we 
say. I( there were never an- 
other conversation, panel or 
dialogue in America racism 
still would remain. 

Racism is more than 
words; it's an action, and it's 
a reality It's a reality that has 
been prevalent in America 
since 1492. It's the precon- 
ceived ideas and prejudices 



that have been planted into 
our very being. 

A group of racist people 
could never talk about their 
views with anyone in the 
world but still discriminate 
and perpetuate their racism 
toward others by acting on 
their assumptions and stereo- 
types. We must talk about 
race so we can minimize 
these actions. So we ask that 
you please refrain from cir- 
culating ignorance that hurts 
the fight against racism and 
join us in our panels to end 
it. 

K-StM* BiKk Stutknt Union 



University should not endorse 'Gay' slur 



Editor. 

1 was in a local coffee shop 
last week when someone 
walked in wearing a T-shirt 
with the K-State Powercat 
symbol and the words "KU is 
Gay" written underneath it. 

The principles of the com- 
rnunily of K-State condemn 
discrimination on the basis 
of sexual orientation, and the 
university handbook forbids 



any discrimination on the 
basis of sexual orientation at 
K-State 

A T-shirt slogan that would 
incorporate the K-State trade- 
mark and the use of the word 
'gay" as a pejorative is in 
direct conflict with the official 
policy of K-State. 

In order to comply with 
copyright law, any use of the 
Powercat on a commercial 
product such as a T-shirt must 



be licensed and approved by 
the owners of the Powercat 

If approval was given for 
this misuse of the symbol, the 
owners of the copyright were 
wrong to do so. 

In any case, the copyright 
owners should stop this inap- 
propriate use of the university 
symbol. 

Of, Mkhavl (.ambwrt 

wsiTiNG munm pitoFEisw of aoioCY 



Weapons ban infringes right to bear arms 



Editor, 

One issue I think every- 
one should be made aware 
of is the proposed reinstate 
meni of the Assault Weap- 
ons Ban, specifically, H.R 
1022. 

This bill, if passed, will 
ban the sale of almost all 
semi-automatic rifles and 
shotguns, not just guns like 
the AK-47 It will ban guns 
listed in the 1994 ban and 
expand on them The list 
includes firearms many 
people would not expect, 
like common .22 rifles, and 
can include certain deer 
rifles Hunters and collec- 
tors no longer can say this 
docs not affect them. 



This is an obvious in- 
fringement on our consti- 
tutional right to bear arms. 
This bill would weaken the 
principles our forefathers 
gave so much to defend, 
as well as lead the way to 
more infringements. To me, 
this is absolutely unaccept- 
able. 

The "reasoning" for the 
ban is to make our coun- 
try safer by taking assault 
weapons from criminals. 
Gun control laws only take 
firearms away from respon- 
sible, law-abiding citizens, 
which hinders our ability to 
prevent crime. More to the 
point, "assault weapons " 
are used in less than two 
percent of violent crime. It 



is ridiculous to think the 
ban would reduce crime. 

1 suggest you stand up 
and make your voice heard 
on this issue. Take a few 
short minutes to write to 
Congress to let them know 
how their constituents feel. 

We have to stay away 
from the "Let the NRA 
deal with this" mentality 
The gun-owning popula- 
tion thought that way in 
the early 1990s and did 
nothing, resulting in the 
previous AWB We must not 
let this treasonous bill gain 
momentum, we must take a 
stand. 

CotfyWIani 

SDPWMOFK IN MiCHANICH ENOINtERING 




PROTESTERS CLASH 
WITH DANISH POLICE 
OVER DISPUTED EVICTrON 

COPENHAGEN, Den- 
mark - Police arrested more 
than 250 people Thursday 
at several demonstrations in 
Copenhagen where protesters 
threw cobblestones, bottles 
and paint at police after an 
anti-terror squad evicted 
squatters fi-om a building, 
police said. 

Three people were treat- 
ed for injuries, including a 
German who was hit on the 
head, according to a hospital 
spokesperson His condition 
was not serious Two Danes 
were treated for minor inju- 
ries. 

The highly publicized evic- 
tion drew ire from the squat- 
ters and other youth, who 
viewed the former theater as 
free public housing for years. 

Onlookers clashed with 
hundreds of police officers 
shortly after the 7 am, evic- 
tion, when a helicopter hoist- 
ed anti-terror police onto the 
building's roof. Officers with 
anti-riot gear sealed off the 
surrounding streets as police 
brought out squatters. 

Police spokesman Per 
Larsen said foreigners were 
probably among those arrest- 
ed, but he had no details on 
nationalities It was unclear 
how many people were inside 
the house when the eviction 
began 

During the afternoon and 
evening, about 1,000 demon- 
strators clashed with police 
on streets nearby, throwing 
rocks, beer bottles and paint 
at officers. Police used tear 
gas to disperse the crowd. 

Demonstrators dug up 
cobblestones from the streets, 
throwing them at police, and 
erected barricades with gar- 



bage containers in several 
places downtown. They lit 
bonfires and overturned sev- 
eral cars. 

Shops and banks near the 
evicted house boarded their 
windows and closed early. 

JAPANESE LEADER DENIES 
EVIDENCE OF COERCION 
IN ALLEGED SEX SLAVERY 

TOKYO - Japan's nation* 
alist prime minister denied 
Thursday that members of 
the country's military forced 
women into sexual slavery 
during World War II, casting 
doubt on a past government 
apology and jeopardizing a 
fragile detente with his Asian 
neighbors. 

The comments by Shinzo 
Abe, a member of a group 
of lawmakers pushing to roll 
back a 1993 apology to the 
sex slaves, were his clearest 
statement as prime minister 
on military brothels known in 
lapan as "comfort stations." 

Historians say some 
200,000 women - mostly from 
Korea and China - served in 
the Japanese military brothels 
throughout Asia in the 1930s 
and '40s. 

Many victims say they 
were kidnapped and forced 
into sexual slavery by Japa- 
nese troops 

But Abe, who since taking 
office in September has pro- 
moted patriotism in japan's 
schools and a more assertive 
foreign policy, told reporters 
there was no proof the women 
were forced into prostitution. 

"The fact is, there is no evi- 
dence to prove there was co- 
ercion," Abe said. 

His remarks contradicted 
evidence in Japanese docu- 
ments unearthed in 1992 that 
historians said showed mili- 
tary authorities had a direct 



role in working with contrac- 
tors to forcibly procure wom- 
en for the brothels. 

The documents, which are 
backed up by accounts firom 
soldiers and victims, said 
Japanese authorities set up 
the brothels in response to 
uncontrolled rape sprees by 
invading Japanese soldiers in 
East Asia. 

8 HAITIANS DIE, 
44MISSING AFTER 
BOAT CATCHES FIRE 

SANTO DOMINGO, Do- 
minican Republic - A boat 
carrying Haitian migrants 
caught fire off the coast of the 
Dominican Republic, leaving 
at least eight passengers dead 
and 44 missing, a U.S Coast 
Guard spokesman said Thurs- 
day. 

The victims were travel- 
ing from the northern Hai- 
tian town of Cap-Haitien to 
the Turks and Caicos when 
their boat caught fire 23 miles 
north of the Dominican Re- 
public, said U.S. Coast Guard 
spokesman Petty Officer Bar- 
ry Bena 

Authorities did not know 
when the blaze occurred, 
when the migrants set sail or 
what caused the fire. 

Two migrants were pulled 
from the water Wednesday 
and brought to a hospital in 
Montecristi on the Domini- 
can Republic's north coast. 
They were treated Thursday 
for first-degree bums, said Dr. 
Maria Belliard. 

Eight of the passengers 
were found dead Thursday in 
the Atlantic Ocean 

A US Coast Guard cutter, 
two airplanes and a helicop- 
ter were searching for other 
survivors, Bena said. 

— Hit Asfedttod fna 



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SPORTS 



Page 6 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



5 players to celebrate senior day 

Upperclassmen finish with national honors, shot at postseason play 



By Jonathan Gartan 

After attending three universities 
in five years, senior Jcrmaine May- 
banic is ready for his senior night. 

Maybank started liis collegiate 
career at Independence Commu- 
nity College in Independence, Kan., 
where he graduated witli an associ- 
ate's degree in education in 2004 He 
also played basketball for two years, 
averaging 12.1 points per game as a 
sophomore. 

Maybank spent the neirt two years 
earning his bachelor's degree from St, 
John's in Queens, NY However, be- 
cause he tore the patellar tendon on 
his right knee and received a medical 
redshirt for the 2004-2005 season, 
he still had one year of eligibility re- 
maining. 

That's why Saturday's game with 
Oklahoma (15-13, 6-9 Big 12) will be 
Maybank 's first official senior night, 

"I didn't have a traditional senior 
night at (St. John's)," Maybank said. 
"That makes this pretty big for me 
and my family." 

Maybank came to K-State on Sept. 
12, 2006 He is pursuing a master's 
degree in college student personnel. 

He only can play for K-State for 
one year, and picked a good one to 
do it. K-State (20-10, 9-6) has had 
one of its best seasons in the last 20 
years. 

By picking up their 20th victory 
Saturday, the Wildcats reached the 
20-win plateau in the regular season 
for the first time since 1988. They 
also ensured a winning conference 
record for the first time since 1989, 
when they still played in the Big 8 
Conference. 

"I'm lucky," Maybank said "I'm 
just happy lo be here. 1 came at the 
right time with the right coach I have 




Cstrlna ltn»«n |(OLLEblAN 
K-Stata't Jtrmaln* Mayhank, right, watches from the bench during the Kansas game Feb. 19 at Stamlage Coliseum. Maybank 
attended three universities in five years and will complete his seniof season here at K-State. 



a great group of guys that are around 
me When you have good people and 
good coaches, then good things are 
going to happen," 

One of those good thin^ could 
be a trip to the NCAA Tournament, 
a place the Wildcats have not been 
since 1996. 

A win Saturday will give K-State 
10 Big 12 wins, 

lliere never has been a Big 12 
team with 20 wins overall and 10 
conference wins that has missed the 
NCAA Tournament 

"It's a big game for us to get into 
the NCAA Tournament, and it's a big 
game as far as seniors because it's our 
last time playing at Bramlage Colise- 
um," senior Lance Harris said "We 



don't think we got enough wins yet. 
We got lo take care of our home floor 
against Oklahoma." 

In addition to Maybank and Har- 
ris, K-State has three other seniors 
- C artier Martin, Akeem Wright and 
Serge Afeli - who will be playing 
their last game at Bramlage. 

AFELI, STEWART NAMED 
ACADEMIC ALL-BIG 12 

Senior Serge Afeli and junior Clent 
Stewart were named to the 2007 Ac- 
ademic All- Big 12 Men's Basketball 
Team Ttiesday 

Afeli was one of 10 players select- 
ed to the league's first team Stewart. 
also Academic All- Big 12 last season, 
became the first Wildcat to repeat 



Academic All-Big 12 honors since 
Ivan Sulic in 2001-02, 

MARTIN EARNS ALL-DISTRICT 12 
HONORS 

The National Association of Bas- 
ketball Coaches selected senior Cart- 
ier Martin to its 2006-07 All-District 
12 second team 

The 150 players, who are selected 
from 15 districts, are eligible for the 
NABC Division I All- America Team. 
That roster will be announced at the 
end of the season 

District 12 includes universities in 
the states of Iowa, Kansas. Missouri, 
Nebraska and Oklahoma 

This season, Martin leads the team 
in scoring with 16.5 points per game. 



Baseball team heads south for Lamar Classic 




CTirlstophtr HantwIncUl 1 COlLEGItN 

Shortstop Dtwm BIcry fitMs a ground 
ball during K-State's game against Kansas 
Wwleyan last season at Tointon Family 
Stadium. The Wikfcats travel to Beaumont, 
Texas this weekend to participate in the 
Lamar Classic baseball tournament. 



By Daynt Log«n 

KAN»SSrMKQLlEGI*N 

The K- State baseball team will es- 
cape the suddenly cold Kansas weath- 
er as they travel to Beaumont, Texas, 
to participate in the Lamar Classic 
tournament 

The Wildcats (7-1) will play St. 
John's (0-6) Friday, Lamar (8-3) Sat- 
urday and California -Santa Barbara 
(3-5) Sunday. 

K State enters the weekend on a 
four-game winning streak, while the 
host of the tournament, Lamar, is on 
a scvun-gamc winning streak of its 
own. 

Last weekend the Wildcats col- 
lected four victories in a similar tour- 
nament hosted by Ohio State K-State 
knocked off the Buckeyes twice and 
collected wins against James Madison 
and Seton Hall, 

'We found ways to win," coach 



Brad Hill said in a radio interview on 
KMAN-AM 1350 "We did a great job 
of finding a way to get on base and 
executing when we had to." 

Sophomore Byron Wiley is one 
player who is having a particularly 
good Stan to the 2007 season Wiley 
is batting .370 with two home runs, 
seven KBl and a .593 slugging per- 
centage. 

Seniors Eli Rumler and Eddie 
Vasquez also are playing well. Rumler 
is hitting .333 with four doubles and 
a home run, while Vasquez, despite 
receiving limited playing time, has 
reached base safely in 6-of- 1 3 at-bats. 

On the mound, juniors Brad Hutt 
and Chase Bayuk have been impres- 
sive in their first two starts of the sea- 
son 

Hutt already has collected two 
wins this year and has an ERA of 
1 32. He also has eight strikeouts and 
surrendered just three walks. Bayuk 



has one victory to his name and an 
ERA of 2.25 

K-State's pitching staff might find 
a tougher challenge from Saturday's 
game with Lamar. The Cardinals are 
batting .381 and are led by sopho- 
more Brian Lloyd, who is hitting .474 
with six doubles, a home run and 13 
RBI 

There are four other Cardinal play- 
ers with batting averages higher than 
.400 Additionally, only one of Lamar's 
nine starters is hitting below 300. 

"We're getting better each week- 
end, but Lamar's very tough at home," 
Hill said. 

St. John's is ted by senior Sam De- 
luca and freshman Daniel Rose, who 
are both batting .385 The Red Storm 
is batting ,262 as a team. 

UC Santa Barbara is coming oS 
back-to-back losses to California last 
weekend. Junior Chris Fox leads the 
team in batting with a .478 average. 



No room to spare on Kansas City roster for aging quarterback 




Don't feel sorry for Trent Green. 

The Kansas City Chiefs signed 
career- backup quarterback Damon 
Huard to a three- 
year, $73 million 
contract Tuesday, 
indicatirig they don't 
want Green back 
in 2007, On top of 
that, the Chiefs are 
looking to trade 
Green, The Kansas 
City Star reported 
Wednesday. 

And while there is a strong chance 
Green will remain a Chief - it will be 
hard to find a team that wants to pay 
hit $7,2 million base salary - the writ- 
ing is OB the wall. The Chiefe' plan for 
the hiture doesnt include Green, who 
will be 37 in July 

The Chie£i want Huard and Brodie 
Ooyte, Kansas City's third -round 
selection in last year's NFL Draft, to 
battle for the starting spot Huard, a 
backup since he entered (he NFL, 
s^ms to be the perfect candidate to 
keep the Chiefs' quarterback position 
warm until Croyle develops 

There just doesn't seem to be 



room for Green on the Chie£i' roster. 
He needs to move on, whether that 
means retirement or renegotiating his 
contract. 

But if anyone can handle being 
forced out because of old age, it's 
Green. He's experienced a career full 
of rejection, disappointment and bit- 
tersweet moments 

In 1993, Green was selected by 
the San Diego Chargers in the eighth 
round with the 222nd pick of the 
draft. He was the eighth quarterback 
and the third-to-last player picked. 

Green spent the next few years try- 
ing to find a team. He even was cut by 
the British Columbia Lions, a Cana- 
dian Football League team, in 1994 

Green finally got his chance to 
start in 1998. He proved his skeptics 
wrong, throwing for 3,441 yards, 23 
touchdowns and only 1 1 intercep- 
tions. 

The numbers he put up in Wash- 
ington impressed St, Louis Rams 
coach Dick Vermeil so much. Green 
was given the keys to Vermeil's high- 
pow^ offense in 1999 It seemed like 
Green, a grinder who had spent six 
years bouncing around prof^swnal 



football, finally would get a break to 
go in hb direction But once again, it 
appeared Green was cursed In the 
Rams' third preseason game, San 
Diego's Rodney Harrison ended his 
season with a hit to the knee. 

Kurt Warner, another journeyman 
quarterback, spent time playing in 
NFL Europe and the Arena Football 
League and bagging groceries at a 
Hy-Vee in Iowa prior to taking over 
for Green. Warner pa^ed for 4,353 
yards, 41 touchdowns and just 13 in- 
terceptions. To add salt to the wound, 
\^%nier also led the Rams to a Super 
Bowl XXXIV title. 

After spending the 2000 season as 
Warner's baclcup. Green followed Ver- 
meil once again, this time to Kantw 
City, where he would once again get 
the opportuni^ to start 

Green's career with the Chieb had 
a rough start. In 2001, he led the NFL 
in interceptions with 24 

However, in the next few years, 
Green's fortune turned around. He 
went to the Pro Bowl in 2003 and 
2005. He also threw for more than 
4,000 yards in 2003. 2004 and 2005 

But it might have been the way 



Green ran that many Chiefs fans held 
dear to their hearts While he certainty 
wasn't known for being light on his 
feet. Green always has risked bodily 
harm for every inch. 

However, that daredevil mental- 
ity got him in trouble Sept. 10, 2006, 
when Cincinnati's Robert Geathers 
delivered a devastating shot while 
Green was attempting a slide. The hit 
kept him sidelined fur two months. 

In his absence, Huard threw 1 1 
touchdowns and kept the Chiefs' play- 
off dreams afloat by leading them to 
five wins. When Green returned to the 
field, obviously affected by his severe 
concussion, he struggled, and it didnt 
take long for fans to begin callmg for 
Huard. 

Green has taken the Chiefs as far 
as he possibly can take them. And 
although it's hard for him to just walk 
away from something that he's poured 
his soul into for the last six years, it's 
time to move on. 

If anyone can do it, it's Green 



J«MMwn 6*rtM is * Junior ifl print Jaumiiiffl . 
ficasc send rommcnb to sperBia:spubJBu.*4it, 




Friday, March 2. 2007 

1-MINUTE 
DRILL 

Staff reports 

RUN I Track team returns 
to Iowa Snl time this month 

The K-Statf VxiindMi turn should M 
comlbrtablf this weetteml at the Iowa Stal« 
last Chance Owlifiei. Ihat^ becaujeii will be 
theteam^thMtrlptD 
Ames, towa, In the past 
month. 

This tine, IwMwr, 
there will be only fouf 
making the trip. Juniors 
Morgan BorKk and 
LaclHeHerwiti trawl 
totalis MM wHl 
sopnOfflOK iMn 
Boixtf Mendu and freshmin 
Bewdy Ramos. 
BotI) Mendez and Ranrn wi be running the 
mik In hopes of qualifying for the NCAA Indoof 
ChampiorHhips corning up next weekend, 
Mareh9-10, 

Elands, who pittvisionally qualified liar the 
Indoor Championships Jrv the SOO-nietfuace, Is 
going for the same reason. 

It Is the last tkr» for me to try and get 
the made llut wlK get me into the [Indoor 
ChampHmships)," Bonds said.'tt will be good hir 
me to get a little more practice at running tlw 
(SOfrmeter)." 

Bonds won the 600 yard race last week at 
the Big 12 meet with a time of 1 :20,tl5, a school 
lecoid. 

If I frel good. I should be able to get the 
automatic nuili,' Bonds said 'Really, my goal 
tNs weekend is to go out and race a Itttke bit 
teltrlliailhw." 

Hetief, who is provisionally qualified and 
placed ihrd last wfk in the weight thniw with 
amaritof 63-7 1/2, said pradKe has Iwlped this 
week, and she hopes It wiH show In her throws. 

1t^ there — I just have to do it and exeofte 
it'HelleT said 'A couple weeks ago ws dianged 
my form. This extra week really helps because 
I'm getting more leps in." 

Heller Is trying to qualriy for nationals tor 
the third time If she does quaify, she will join 
sophomore wetght thnxMrloren Groves at the 
NCAA meet 



TEN I Iowa state matdi 
postponed until next week 

The women's tennis team was preparing to 
fete Iowa State today ir> its Big 12 Conference 
season opener, but after a blicard waming 
was issued for Ames, 
Iowa, the match was 

postponed 

'"* ^^ ^^ The matdi will be 
rescheduled neitt week. 
Furttter infonnation was 
not available at prts 
time. 

Ho.6H-Staie(2-4, 
(H)Blg121w«lgoiip 
Kl Imova againstMlssourl(4-3,0- 
2) Satuniay K-State stlR 
wibewtthouljuniorTamafKvaratskhelia,who 
was Injured two weeks ago 

Although Missouri has struggled against 
other Big 1 2 teams, coach Stew Bietau said 
he still is oinviKed of Ihe toughness of the 
conference. 

1}ur sdwdule is very tough,' he said. H^ 
designed to get us to go to the NCAA (tourna- 
ment), and the margin fw error Is very slim. 
Eating with die loss of teamn^ates is not ftjn 
hrMqtwdHr.PNR's some disappointment, 
oftaMy, tnttweaie not the team we had 
hoped to be tight now.' 

Aimor Tereza Prochazkova, who played her 
first matches 1^ week since being sidelined 
with a knee injury In October, said she wM be 
kxiking lorward to the competition playing In 
(he conference brings, 

"We're kjoking fofwart to the stiff comprtt- 
tlon against the teams that we can beat if we 
play viel I," she said. 

When II comes to other factors In the 
matd)es, junior Olga Klimova said she wants to 
setlmpnnement 

1 want to see the team Impfove,' she said 
If we improve and compete with them, tt)e Big 
12 matches and the end-of-lhe-year tourna- 
ment will come into play. Ewry single match is 
Important and Im excited about fighting for the 
match and trying to win." 

— Wendy ItaMn 



WEQ I Equestrian to compete 
In 2 snows this weekend 

The K-State equeshian team will be host to 
two shows this weekend at R»( Creek Stables, 
Induding a western show Saturday and a 
varsity head-to-head match with Texas A&M 
Sunday. 

K-State will send 24 Westem ttders, induding 
vmn fieshmen, to (ace five other sthooK 
Induding Bladi Hawk College, kwa State, 
Missouri St*te, liiorthwesi Missouri State and 
Tniman State. 

Sahjntay's Western show will be split into 
two shows, beginning at 9 am with reining. 
After a one hour brsak, the second show wi 
begin at 1 p.m with horsemanship. The show 
also will feature nowce, imemiediate, a^anced 
and beginner horsemanship and open reining 

Sunday's varsity show wHI begin at 9 a.m. 
If weather permits, the nders will li^ m die 
outdoor arena, and the show will start widi 
die Ancillary classes Hovwver, If the riders can 
only use (he indoor arena. Ancillary classes 
will be cancelled and die show will slan w*d> 
Equitation owfentet 




t 



Friday, March 2, 2007 



KANSAS STATt COLLEGIAN 



Page? 



Obama rep addresses 
national teleconference 



ByJoiMuHogg 

WNSAiSIHKCHLf&M 

Campus newspapers across 

the nation participated yester 

day in the first of a series of 

^teleconferences with members 

^, of the presidential campaign of 

:•- Sen. Barack Obama, DM 

Bill Burton, national press 
-secretary for the Obama for 
^^^America Campaign, led a ques 
tion and answer session for col- 
let foumalists 

Q: How U Sen. Obama plan- 
"'ning to make hia campaign 

accewible to college ttudenti? 
How is he going lo try and gel 
them lo vote? 

A: Well, he is conunitted to 
making sure that college stu- 
dents and young folks every- 
where are an important part of 
this campaign. 

If you look at his schedule so 
far, he's spent a lot of time al- 
ready on college campuses, and 
if you listen to what he says, he 
""specifically points to the fact 
that at every important junc- 
ture in our history, >< was youitg 
folks who stepped and forced 
the change to happen - as he 
puts it, put their shoulder to 
"'the wheel of history in order 
"■ to make things better than they 
" were. So he considers this lo be 
."' another such opportunity. 

Q; What are Sen. Obama'i 
views on ^obat warming, and 
- what is his plan lo address it? 

"A; Sen. Obama has been com- 
mitted to a new energy policy 

""in this country that decreases 
our dependence on foreign 
sources of energy, specifically 
oil, because he thinks that it 
will 1) help to relieve the ^obal 
^ climate crisis; 2) create a situ- 
ation where we're not so de- 
pendent on parts of the world 
where we're actually helping to 
fund both sides of the war on 
terror; and 3) we rely more on 
' renewable ener^ sources that 

— are cleaner for the environment 
and ultimately cheaper for the 
American consumer and also 



help us create jobs here in the 
coimtry. 

Q: ITie LA. Hmes ran ait ar- 
ticle claiming Sen. Obama 
would need Ihe black vole in 
order lo win. and received a 
h)l of backlash. People said the 
idea was very racist, lo thii4 
a btadi candidate would need 
his own race to win. What was 
Mr. Obama's reaction to that? 
A: Sen Obama is proud to be 
rooted in the African- Ameri- 
can community From his early 
work in community organizing 
in some of Chicago's poorest 
neighborhoods to the ground- 
breaking law he passed outlaw- 
ing racial profiling in lUinois, 
he's always fought to make 
America a place where you are 
what you are, and there should 
be no barriers to your success 
based on what your race is. As 
far as the African-American 
vote in this country, 1 don't 
think anybody expected that 
African -Americans as a group 
would vote in a monolithic fash- 
ion. Sen. Obama wants to and 
knows that he ought to fight for 
every vote that he earns or gets. 

Q: Sen. Obama has o(Hne un- 
der fire for aligning himself 
with the African -American 
community because some al- 
lege he is not African Ameri- 
can. Is that something he is 
concerned about? 
A: Sen. Obama actually is Afri- 
can-American. 1 think that he's 
rujuiing this campaign in such 
a way that he's fighting for and 
earning votes from folks in ev- 
ery single community. 

Q: I meant his family emigrat- 
ed more recently and was not 
part of the slave history. 

A: I get what you'rt saying, and 
regardl^s of what folks* per- 
ceptions are of him, he's going 
through a proce^ where he 
has to introduce himself to the 
American people and make sure 
people know about his back- 
ground and know what makes 
him tick, to make sure he's the 



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right guy to be president right 
now, whether tfte questions are 
about race or the views on en- 
ergy policy or national security 
or any one of those thinp. 

Q Sen. Obama passed a blD 
expanding the Federal Pefl 
Gtanli prognm. What can we 
expect from Obama In lemu 
of making college more afford- 
able for ftudenls? 
A: He is al»olutely committed 
to making sure college is afford- 
able and accessible lo everyone 
who wants to go. He doesnt 
think that you should be de- 
nied college education based on 
where you were bom or how 
much money your folks made. 
It should be based on wheth- 
er or not you want to go and 
whether or not you're coitunit- 
ted to learning 

Q: What is Sen. Obama go- 
ing to bring to the dentoctatic 
campaign Ihal would be differ- 
ent from Sen. Hillary Clinton, 
D-N.Y., and how his campaign 
is going lo be something new 
for the Democratic Party? 
A: Sen Obama doesn't con- 
sider this a race against any one 
individual or even a group of in- 
dividuals. He's running because 
he thinks that he is, at this time, 
the most suited to be president, 
for a variety of reasons. He has 
a vision that if we all work to- 
gether and that if the folks who 
sign on to help his campaign 
and the people thai vote for him 
later on are all committed to this 
idea, that we can transform the 
way that we do politics in this 
coimtry. Then we can transform 
politics in this country. 

There are differences, and 
people will talk about what is the 
difference between this health 
care plan and that healthcare 
plan .. but most importantly is 
the sense that Sen Obama tnJy 
t^lieves that we can transform 
this countty He's not just run- 
ning because he wants to win. 
He's running because he wants 
to transform business in Wash- 
ington. 



Chef provides Mediterranean 
workshop in dining center 



By KrltUn Hedges 

MNWSSIArtMlU&IAK 

Scents of the Mediterranean 
wafted through the Der^ Din- 
ing Center Gold Room as Chef 
Thji Marie prepared everything 
&tim chorizo and chickpeas to 
couscous pilaf with apricots 
and almonds for the Flavors 
of the Mediterranean Culi- 
nary Enhancement Workshop 
TTiursday. 

The Department of Hotel, 
Restaurant, bistitution Man- 
agement and Dietetics and 
Housing and Dining Services 
sponsored the third aimual 
woilcshop, said Melissa A. 
Schrader, registered dietitian 
for Housing and Dining Ser 
vices and instructor in the de- 
partment. 

"We |ust want it to be a fun 
event for everyone attending," 
she said 

Workshop attendees 

watched as Marie added oils 
and spices to the dishes she 
prepared. When she finished, 
the guests tried samples of the 
cuisine 

Guests also participated in 
a hands-on workshop and ate 
a Mediterranean lunch. 

Cordon Andrews, profes- 
sor of veterinary pathology, at- 




ChrittoplMr HMMWindMt | COlKGIAN 
Chaf Tajl Maria adds olive oil to a hot pan during a cooking demon- 
stration Thursday in the Golden Room at the Derby Dining Center. 
Marie is a Mediterranean-style chef from Califomia who came to 
K-State for the Culinary Enhancement Workshop. 



lendi^d the event after his wife 
bought him the registration as 
a gift. 

'1 do most of the cooking 
at home," he said, "and I've al- 
ways cooked." 

Andrews said he has at- 
tended culinary workshops 
before and found them to be a 
fun way lo spend the day 

After the course with Marie, 
he said he plans to start cook- 
ing Mediterranean cuisine. 

Schrader said 43 food ser- 
vice professionals, alumni and 
supporters of the College of 
Human Ecology registered 



for the event, which cost $100 
for a day of demonstrations of 
Spanish. Moroccan and Greek 
food. 

The registrations have 
made it possible for students lo 
attend at a reduced cost," she 
said 

Schrader said students in 
the department will attend the 
workshop today and will go 
thiou^ the same demonstra 
tions, but for only $2. 

She said the workshop fea 
lured Asian food in previous 
years, but the organizers try to 
vary the cuisine. 



New artist to perform at K-State 



BjrBNttKifig 

KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Pap-rock singer Sarah Pea- 
cock will perform at 7:30 p,m 
Monday in Union Station in 
the K-State Student Union. 

Using a blend of pop, rock, 
jazz and classic rock 'n' roil, 
Ptacock developed her own 
pop- rock sound, according 
to her Web site, ttm/w.sarah- 
peacockmusic.com. Her light- 
hearted and down-to-earth 



personality help her present a 
true look into the life of a mu- 
sician, according to the site 

A native of Atlanta, Peacock 
b on a nine-city tour through 
cities like Denver, New Or- 
leans and Birmingham, Ala 

Ben Hopper, program 
adviser for K-Stale's Union 
Program Coimcil, the event's 
sponsor, said council membere 
decided to invite Peacock out 
after hearing her perform last 
fall in Little Rock. Ark 



"We bring a variety of acts 
in, and thb is one that we re 
ally liked, so we figured that 
we would bring her in," Hop- 
per said. 

Erica Boatman, entertain- 
ment committee co-chair for 
UPC, compared Peacock to 
Regina Spektor 

"She is all over the board as 
far as what genres are," Boat 
man said. "She is pretty fun 
and funky, which appeals to a 
lot of people." 



Q^BeailAglui 

K^ptorttt 



-Notice- 



Car Clinic 

is moving to 

<:^0£o% Linn, Una. 

At 209 Sarber Lane 

After 42 years of faithful service, our 
community's friend Dave Ekart is retiring. 
Under this new merge, the businesses will be 
jointly named Car Clinic, Inc. 

Due to downtown redevelopment, the 
business will be closed on March 1-2 and 
relocate to; 209 Sarber Lane. 

Car Clinic, Inc. will re-open Monday, March 
5th at 7:30 AM. To know more, call 539- 1040. 



Bwsis ^0 min 







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Page 8 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, March 2, 2007 



Local, online retailers 
attend Fair Trade social 



By Lola ShrimpMn 

KANSAS STMKOLLEGIAN 

Members of Ecumenical 
Campus MJnistri^ and repre- 
sentatives of local businesses 
gathered Thursday night for 
the Pair Trade Social at the 
Crossroads of ECM building. 

"Its an issue of humanity," 
said Sarah Mitts, senior in 
business management 

Pair Trade means an eq- 
uitable and fair partnership 
between marketers in North 
America and producers in oth- 
er parts of the world, accord- 
ing to umm>.ghbalexchange. 
org. It is a global issue, Mitts 
said. 

Citing Starbucks as an cx- 
am{>le. Mitts said farmers in 
Africa are offered 20 cents per 
pound for coffee beans, when 
the global price is about $1 
per pound. 

Starbucks sells the beans to 
U.S. consumers for $10 to S20 
per pound. 



Local businesses sold their 
products St the social, includ- 
ing People's Grocery tnd 
Thread. 

Also attending were Brady 
Swenson and Alicia Erickson 
of IVo Hands Worldshop. 

The representatives of the 
online store, www.twokartd- 
sworldshopcom, said they 
plan to open a store in Law- 
rence this summer 

Swenson and Erickson be- 
came involved with fair trade 
when Swenson spent time 
with the Peace Corps in Guy- 
ana and dealt with people di- 
rectly when buying food and 
supplies. 

Erickson later joined him, 
and both discovered different 
ways to buy locally. 

"TYade is fundamentally a 
human interaction," Swenson 
said. 

Swenson and Erickson 
became involved with orga- 
nizations that build coopera- 
tives, allowing people to earn 



a living wage while bypassing 
multinational corporations, 
Swenson said. 

Using bananas as an ex- 
ample, Swenson said sales are 
controlled by five companies, 
including Dole and Chiquita. 

"Producers are left behind 
completely," he said. 

Using fair trade, producers 
earn a fair wage for their prod- 
ucts and are able to sustain 
themselves and their families, 
he said. 

"The cool thing about fair 
trade is it's a consumer move- 
ment," he said. 

Erickson agreed, saying 
consumers have the choice 
of who to buy from. She said 
consumers are responsible for 
keeping Pair Tk-ade going and 
making sure the marketers in 
other parts of the world are 
able to make a living and sup 
port themselves. 

"It's about fixing something 
that is very, very wrong," she 
said. 




Allda Ertckion 
and Brady 

Swansort, ownara 
of Twra Hands 
Worldshop, cam* 
to Crossroads of 
ECM Thursday 
night to speak 
about their experi- 
ences with Fair 
Trade. Two Hands 
Worldshop is a 
distributor of Fair 
Trade Items located 
in Lawrence, Kan. 

MMICattra 

COLlEtlAN 



FICTION 



Earbud Evil | A loss, then something is found 



By Logan C. Adams 

KANSAS mTECOtLEGIAN 

Editor's note: TTih is the fifth segment of "Earbud Evil," a 
fictional story the Collegian is publishing daily for the next 
three weeks. This story follozvs Alex, a fictional K-State stu- 
dent, as he deals with a campus-wide crisis that threatens the 
university. 

Though the names of real people will accompany made-up 
characters, all events are fictional. This is intended for enter- 
tainment and is not factually based. 

1 could hear myself think 

Then I stepped into Bramlage, where the amassed fan; 
taught mc the true meaning of "loud" 

Studying had taken a few minutes longer than I'd intended, 
and traffic was worse than I'd planned for. The clock told me 
less than 20 minutes remained before the men's basketball 
team played the University of Kansas 

My seating ~ or should 1 say, standing - options, in relation 
to the playing surface, were "far" and "farther " I took the best 
I could get 

I was standing next to a group of young women, likely fresh- 
men, in the same black "K-State Proud" T-shirts most people 
in the student section were wearing. The people behind the 
campaign said they were meant to serve a good purpose, but I 
thought they looked like a cult. 

Let's just hope they don't start telling everyone to drink 
Kool-Aid 

I got along just fine with my neighbors until the band start- 



ad pll^iiig the Wabash Cannonball and I realized what sort of 
people were next to me, 

1 turned with the music's opening notes. My neighbors did 
not. 

1 clapped my hands to the beat. They did not, 

1 started rocking back and forth when the main part of the 
song began. Again, they did not. My curse had held strong once 
again. 

No matter how hard I try, I always wind up watching bas- 
ketball games with lazy fans - the ones who are too good to 
clap, or cheer, or Wabash They just stand there, gawk for a 
few hours and block the view of any real fans who get to the 
coliseum late. 

My friends tell me 1 shouldn't worry over it, that I shouldn't 
care what other people do. As much as I'd like to, though, it's 
hard to Wabash properly when the person next to you is not. 
You look like you're doing something naughty. 

I kept rocking for the whole song, despite my uptight neigh- 
bors, in hopes of getting them to join. It didn't work. 

They didn't worry me much longer. 1 looked at the thriving 
mass more carefully and noticed dozens of {ayhawk fans who 
had infiltrated the student section around me They were either 
K-State students who rooted for KU (traitors) or KU fans who 
bought student tickets from K-State students (again, traitors). 

Then I saw Bill He was wearing blue and red 

Blue and red are Jayhawk colors, which did not belong any- 
where near Bill, who was a dyed-in-the-purple K-State fan. But 
he was wearing them none the same. 

"At least he left his iPod at home." I thought. "It would be a 
shame if someone stole it." 



The game started. The game ended. Everyone knows what 
happened between those moments, so I won't write about it 
anymore. 

1 remembered the after-game party and got there after 50 
minutes of waiting on traffic. It seemed more like a wake when 
I got there, though. 

"Hey, thanks for coming," Katie said as I came in the door. 
"It's not as wild as I thought it would be, but a( least the food 
won't all go to waste" 

The stereo played songs from K-State's marching band with 
the volume down low, like a weird sort of funeral. About 15 
people milled about, talking about how they thought the game 
could have been won and cursing the team from Lawrence, 

"It's a good thing you got going on here," I said as I cracked 
open a cheap can of beer "It's a chance to mourn " 

I thought about raising a toast to what might have been, 
then thought the better of it and just sipped the beer. It was ice 
cold and thin. 

"There's always next." Katie started saying when the stereo 
started popping out all sorts of terrible squealing and squawk- 
ing and sputtering. 

She rushed over, killed the volume and pulled an iPod with 
a mini -transmitter out of a hiding spot. 

"1 don't know what it is with this thing, it can't handle 
strong frequencies or something," Katie said. 

I asked for it and she passed it to me The screen said the 
title was "The Sunflower State SporU T^lk Show." I asked her 
where she got it. 

"It's some podcast," she said. "Rhett told me he really liked 
it." 



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Friday, March 2, 2007 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Rage 9 



CLINTON I Faculty, students encourage Landon Lecture attendees 
to disregard political affiliations, listen with open minds 



continued from page 1 

In 2004 He also created the 
William j. Clinton Founds 
tion with the mission "to 
strengthen the capacity of 
people in the United States 
and throughout the world to 
meet the challenges of global 
interdependence." 

Clinton served as president 

from 1993 to 2001. Prior to 

his presidency, he was elect 

ed Arkansas attorney general 

.without opposition in 1976 

rand served as Arkansas gov- 

' emor from 1978 to 1980 and 

^1982 to 1992. 

l In 1998, Clinton was the 
-second US. president to be 



impeached by the U.S. House 
of Representatives. He was 
tried in the Senate and found 
not guilty of the charges 
brought against him. 

Clinton will be remem- 
bered for having eight strong 
years of economic growth, as 
well as being the first modem 
president to be impeached, 
said Joe Aistrup, head of the 
Department of Political Sci- 
ence Aistrup said he will 
listen for inconvenient truths 
during Clinton* lecture 

"Any president of any 
political stripe is given a little 
bit of leeway to say things 
that we may not always want 
to hear, but represent a little 



bit of political truths that we 
need to hear," Aistrup said. 

|oe Badger, KSU College 
Republicans public relations 
chair, said he plans to attend 
the lecture. Regardless of 
whether one likes Clinton, he 
was president of the United 
States, which is a position 
that demands respect, said 
Badger, junior in political 
science 

"Whatever he docs speak 
about, people should take 
into consideration," Badger 
said. "I think that's fair with 
almost every speaker. In a 
university setting, you're 
supposed to keep an open 
mind, and there's supposed 



to be diversity of thought." 

Chris Kennedy, senior in 
pohlical science, started a 
Facebook.com event group 
titled "Bill Clinton Landon 
Lecture" on Feb. 21, after 
tickets for the lecture became 
available. Despite personal 
political views, Kennedy said 
students and faculty members 
should enter Clinton's lecture 
with an open mind. 

"He's been in a unique 
position," Kennedy said 
'Whatever he brings to the 
table is something we don't 
often get to hear at Kansas 
State, and it'll be a great 
opportunity for everyone in 
attendance." 



WEBCAM I Cameras provide live feed of Aggieville at new Web site 



continued from page 1 

; "We caught someone doing 
: something he really shouldn't 
ihave been doing out in pub- 
riic," he said. 

> Some people have mixed 
-feelings about having their 
- actions shown on the Web 
|uhe Nelson, server at 
Kite's and K-State alumna. 
_ said she thinks Webcams are 
^neat but was not sure she 
' !iked being recorded all the 

• time. 

; "1 just hope 1 don't do 

• anything embarrassing," said 

• Melissa Jandera, sophomore 
I in family studies and human 
Z services. 

|eff Stegeman, sophomore 



in marketing, said it would be 
fun to see his drunken friends 
on camera. 

"I'm nut freaked out about 
it," he said. 

Levin said people shouldn't 
be too worried about having 
something bad shown online 
because visitors only will be 
able to view whatever is hap- 
pening at the moment, not 
previous activity. 

"It's no big-brother attempt 
to analyze," he said. 

However, the cameras' 
main purpose is not to catch 
people doing bad things or 
help the Riley County Police 
Department. 

"This is not just about 
security or reporting it," 



said Garrett Pennington, 
information technology 

specialist at Varney's. "The 
core of the site is about 
community. It's a social site" 

The Web site still is under 
construction, and its builders 
say improvements are on the 
way. 

"We're really trying to 
make it a community driven 
site." said Travis Rail, Varney's 
IT. specialist. 

Rail and Pennington said 
the Web site eventually will 
show events, concerts, drink 
specials and other features 
users can personalize to their 
interests. 

Almost all of the Web site's 
popularity has developed 



through word of mouth. 
Levin said. 

"We really haven't done 
any formal advertising," he 
said. 

The site has received hits 
from JO different countries. 
Levin said. He said many 
of the hits come from 
alumni, soldiers in Iraq, 
students studying abroad and 
other people no longer in 
Manhattan 

"People want to watch 
what's going on and 
participate, but everyone 
can't be here," Levin said. 
"Aggieville has a history. It 
has myths about it. Everyone 
has their own stories of their 
time in Aggieville." 



LENT I Restaurants promote, 
add new vegetarian, fish entrees 



continued from ptigt 1 

a month now, so I thought 
we ought to add them We 
want to serve the needs of the 
customers, and we knew that 
there would be people want- 
ing those types of products 
this season, so we decided to 
do it" 

Several other restaurants 
either have added fish prod- 
ucts to their menus or are 
promoting their existing fish 
products. Buffalo Wild Win^ 
added both a fish and chips 
special and a fish and pop- 
corn shrimp special for the 
season, and Arby's is sell- 
ing two fish sandwiches for 
$4 Kentucky Pried Chicken 
added a fish sandwich to its 
menu. 

However, some restau- 
rants are not concerned 
about the influence Lent will 
have on business. 

D wight Denman, man- 
ager of Cumby's Pizza, said 
he doesn't think business wiU 
be affected enough to change 
anything. 

"I'm not even sure when 
Lent is,' he said. "But we 
have a $3.99 special on 
large cheese pizzas, and 
there are always choices for 
vegetables " 

Alison Mense, sophomore 
in economics, said she is able 
to avoid eating meat even at 



places that don't make special 
additions to the menu. 

"It's what you make it," 
she said. "There are always 
ways to avoid it, and there are 
options at pretty much every 
place if you look for them. 
It's not inconvenient. It's just 
something that we do." 

Aside from resisting 
the temptation to eat 
meat, a concern for those 
participating in Lent is the 
mercury level in some fish 
products. According to the 
Environmental Protection 
Agency's Web site, uww. 
epa.gov, mercury makes ib 
way into bodies of water 
after soil decomposition; 
volcanic eruptions; the 
breaking down of rocks; or 
the burning of coal, wood, oil 
or other natural gases Most 
fish contain some level of 
mercury, but some are safer 
than others. 

Shark, king mackerel, 
swordfish and tilefish are 
among the most dangerous 
and should be consumed 
sparingly, according to the 
EPA. 

Shrimp, carmed light 
tuna, salmon and catfish 
on average contain smaller 
amounts of mercury and are 
safer for consumption. 

Fast -food chains typically 
use fish that contain low 
levels of mercury. 



ONLINE 

Urn observer; can ctodcsiltllK^forinafirMtKi wild ubnon jndiiuidi 
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We've got the stories you've got to read. 

The Royal Purple yearbook Is available in Kedzie 103 or call 532-6555. 



Collegian 




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Poster Q&A: 1 1 :30 am to 1 :30 pm 
Award Ceremony: 4:30 pm 

Come listen to students talk about their research! 
Sponsored by The Graduate School and Graduate Student Council. 

Friday, March 2, 2007, K-State Student Union 2"<* Floor 

Drinks are provided. 



ONCE IN A LIFETIME 



Page 10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, March 2. 2007 



£p4mf inspiration 

Classic, new shoe styles appear on bridal scene for this wedding season 



■yHwmihBlkk 

KANSAS STATE lUKGIAN 

Planning a wedding can be stress- 
ful. ]iut ask Bridget McCuire, senior in 
microbiology. 

"It is definitely a lot of work," said 
McGuire, a bride to be "Since I'm 
abo graduating this spring, it has made 
things even more tough" 

Between sending out hundreds of 
invitations, deciding on the best cake 
flavor and making sure the florist 
knows when to show up, couptes and 
their families might feel overwhelmed. 
However, amid all the hustle and bustle 
of the planning process, brides know 
there is one small, yet significant, de- 
cision to be made It's a decision that 
will help determine the level of their 
wedding' style and comfort - brides 
everywhere want to locate the perfect 
wedding shoe 

•'I haven't really thought about the 
shoes too much yet," McCuire said 
"But 1 know it's important, and I'm 
sure I'll find exactly what I love." 

Marissa Moeder, owner of Cel- 
ebrations of the Heart, a bridal bou- 
tique, detailed several fresh styles for 
the spring wedding season, including 
shoes ranging from ballet fUts to sti- 
letto heels. 

"One new trend we've noticed is 
the popularity of the 1940s-style heel," 
Moeder said. "It's covered on the heel, 
open down the sides and then typically 
is open-toed with straps over the top of 
the toes" 

Other papular styles that seem to 
appear CTety season include ballet flats 
and formal flip-flops, Moeder said. 



These basic varieties offer brides the 
ultimate in comfort and dependability, 
and with all else there is to deal with, 
that can be a big plus 

"I'm really open for any type of 
shoe, as long as it's comfortable," Mc- 
Guire said. 

Wedges have gained popularity in 
the casual fashion scene over the past 
few years, and last year designers tried 
to introduce them in the worid of brid- 
al boutiques and nuptial catalogs Not 
too many brides are witling to wear 
wedges, though, Moeder said. 

'The wedges are just chunkier, and 
most brides are looking for more of a 
slimmer, feminine heel," Moeder said 
"We haven't had too many women 
show an interest in them." 

Moeder also shared a few other 
bridal footwear trends for the spring 
Some brides are choosing to dye their 
shoes blue to satisfy the age-old rhyme 
of something old, something new, 
something borrowed, something blue. 
Others are opting to march down the 
aisle barefoot. 

"Occasionally, a bride will say she 
wants to wear her tennis shoes," Mo- 
eder said. "But the mother always steps 
in and says 'No, you will wear heeb on 
your wedding day!' They usually listen, 
too." 

The bride is not, however, the only 
one with feet that matter. Many brides- 
maids purchase dye-able heels and col- 
or them to match their druses Bridal 
colors to look for thb season include a 
pink tea rose, turquoise, and more off- 
beat, a brown espresso bean. Ivory is 
typically a classic spring color m well, 
Moeder said. 




1^ Wedding tips 

Easy handmade statkmefy 

SMmBy dteirthMblitaqMitlw b hvRss. 
hneMteMMkM (ngnrnwd tlwmk-wu 
■iis^«ta)M«inl»o»rtosuii9|MpMb9ed 
aril indenwtop«i Imprint onlfloditoawtf 

i or rnilvrHpltin rings. 






Typewriter guest book 

M out an old4i&hion(d typewrttcr Willi long 
sheets of piper fcr gueb tD wttr good wtsbes to 
(Ik biidt wd grKMR B the tnllng soiH. iMk lor 
kw^ensiw, vtnnge madiiBoriwtf Kthrlfl 
dORSff flei markets Thiyamie In colen to go wHi 
wypalene. After the wedAMitte intoiKitij with 



Atasteofdiampa9ne 

How bet m tfsilrei tetiM mood/ Shnpfir let the 
dun^i^biMlR fly. The (izithattkUH th« no)* 
and spMb ktndhinMl for ifM weddhg toast, syn- 
onjfnwui wUi (xMnUoTL Beyofid tha^ champagne 

kapttcmal, dMugh no Iss fisi. Create a pncHsian 
of sWHb made with d>a<Tipagne (an)^ other fine, 
champagne-ityleifMUing wlnewl do)tEtas wdl 
to bemioyrd thrnighautthefiilkeiMdiKng feiit 
ftom codcta^ how to cof^ sentot. 



Pressed bouquet 

TradWonal^, a bfldeselem a ^ flowen Fn>m her 
bouiruef to pms and put in the badofthe weddins 
alxim But thei¥&no need fortheUossomtft * 
pemainhiddetiawavwhentheyeaslycanbefriined 1 
ktHsfigf. i 

1 
Mtrthewteddln^selecrtheflowerilhattoaiifresh- | 
«st and press them far one to two wr«4(i Cut mat 1 
botfdKifl]inffpictuRhwne,afldlaynf^ona i 
wnksurte-Ainngethebiaofmontheboan^lhen ' 
tmUyafflreidiwWiablt of oaftgkw. Leidry, 
and place Ihem in the ftamt 



Calrlna fiawsort | tOUfOlAK 

IMOs-styla showar* ntaklng a comeback. Celebrations of the Heart, located 
at 401 Poyntz Ave., has thei* rhinestone-studded shoes in stock, ready for 
customers to try on. 



Chocolate spoons 

Wnn Ifttlliefcr after-dinner toffee, stir tfiings up 
detdoiH^. Rqibce ulver ^mns with the (hootlate 
wriety, n>» utensifs are made enlWy o( semisweet 
dwcoiate dusted wHh cocoa powder, and Ihey melt 
in hot coffee, giving the beverage a hdi inocha 
flawr. (iamlsh eadi with a dollop of whelped oum 
and an extra sprinkkiQ of uxoa powder. 

^ MmuiwttettMirtcM 



1 




Catrlni RawMfl 

COUtGIAN 



Old flames bring memories, but beware 



There are a number of important 
milestones in every romantic rela- 
tionship. 

Some are obvi- 
ous - the first date, 
the first kiss or 



« 



CHRISTINA 
HANSEN 



Easy treats carry wedding colors 
from ceremony to reception 

Cream cheese mints 

t ounces aeam cheese 

I pounds powdered sugar 

l/l teaspoon ffavoring 

bod coloring of thosen wedding color 

Mh all ingredients and knead until creamy and smooth. Roll into tiny balls, dust with fine 
granulated sugar and press into rubber or ptastK molds. Immedlatefy remove from mold 
and place on wax paper Allow to dry. 



lutteraeam mints 




1 coloring or chosen wedding color 



4 ubiespoons butter, softened 

J tablespoons sweetened condensed mllll 

4 Clips powdered sugar 

1/2 tNspoons spearmint flavoring 

1 draft green food coloring or cho; 

gramlated sugar 

rubber candy molds 

Blend softened butter and condensed milk together. Gradually add powdered sugar until 
mbnure becomes stiff Add flavoring and coloring a little at a time to reach desired color 
and taste. Roll into small balls, Roll balls into granulated sugar Press ball Into candy 
mold. Unmold ai once. Makes about % candies. For use later: Quick freeze on a cookie 
sheet. Place between layers of waxed paper in an airtight conUlner Better when made a 
week or two in advance. 



Stott ingredient cream cheese mints 

i ounces cream cheese 

i Ubiespoons hal^and-h)tf 

1/4 cup soft butler 

IS owKfs white creamy frattinq mhi 

1 teaipMn peppermint extraa 

fiwd rolanng of chosen wedding color 



Combine cream cheese, half and half and butter in a heavy bottomed saucepan. 
low heat until cheese mixture is soft and creamy and butler is melted Blend in ft 



. Stir over 
I creamy and butler is melted Blend in frosting^ 
I well Add peppermmt extract Mdfotd coloring Dtvide lo make several colors. Roll 
~l or drop by teaspoon onto wind paper. Press with a fork or stamp with design 
If desired. Let stand, uncovered, at room temperature until firm and outside li dry. The 
'" t itwiM still be creamy Makes about i dozen. 



— R*dp« (nm mmmftMirt.tom/b(/>iKrt^lbk/»A}wtJ4liifmlntsJitm 



the first break-up 
But often these 
"Sixteen Candles' 
moments, while 
significant at the 
time they occur, 
are not the most 

memorable in a 

relationship, nor 

do they end up having the most 

profound effect on our lives 

A more important milestone, in 
my experience, is hearing for the 
first time thai a past boyfriend or 
girlfriend is getting married. 

This is a moment that usually 
occurs well after a relationship 
has ended, but it can bring back a 
surprisingly powerful concoction of 
memories and emotions. 

The good times and the bad 
come rushing back, leaving some 
feeling wistfully nostalgic, and oth- 
ers just bitter and angry. 

The bottom line is this; for 
whatever reason, you and your sig- 
nificant other could not or would 
not make the ultimate decision to 
commit. 

But now, the person you once 
loved and cared very deeply for has 
made that commitment - to some- 
one else In 



an altered set of events and circum- 
stances, no matter how unlikely, it 
could have been you. 

I had my first brush with this 
parallel universe of past relation- 
ships about a year ago when I ran 
into an old boyfriend. After a few 
minutes of innocuous chatter, he 
abruptly told me he would getting 
married in a few months and pro- 
ceeded to invite me to the wedding 

I was initially shucked, and 
admittedly a bit incredulous at the 
news I didn't even know there was 
someone new in his life, and deep 
down, don't we all secretly think 
we're just a little bit harder to get 
over than we really are? Then came 
the memories - a lot of memories 

But finally, days, even weeks 
later, came perspective. 

Why did a past flame's engage- 
ment bother me so much? Because, 
for the first time in a history of ter- 
minating relationships, I was faced 
with permanent consequences that 
could not be reversed. 

Seeing an ex with a new girl- 
friend had always seemed like a 
crossroads, but seeing one with 
a fianci that day felt distinctly 
like a dead end. It was the end of 
the road, and the abruptness had 
caught me off guard 

But what I came 
to realize is that 
although the 
news was 
unexpected. 




it was all of the regrets and what-ifs 
that annoyed me. 1 had fallen into 
the infamous nostalgia trap 

I kept remembering the good 
times, the shared moments - every- 
thing that was good during the time 
we were together. 

But amid all of the warm fuzzies, 
I had neglected to recall a single 
fight or hurtful word exchanged 
during our relationship 

When these memories surfaced 
days later, 1 came to the realiza- 
tion I had actually felt relieved, not 
regretful, when the relationship in 
question ended a few years before. 

We all make decisions in our 
personal relationships, whether 
that be to commit to building and 
strengthening ties to a significant 
other or severing them completely. 

You have to make the best deci- 
sion you can and then move on. 
Looking at ex-boyfriends and girl- 
friends and wondering what might 
have been is an exercise in futility. 
Just accept that it wasn't. 

Embracing what these individu- 
als taught you about yourself and 
about life will make you much hap 
pier in the here and now. and it will 
help you to wish your ex the best 
as he or she continues this process, 
even if it is with someone else. 



(hriitin* Hanwn is a senior in mist com 
munioitioni. PItase send your comments 
to Qpnhii'i'simb.kut.t4ii. 



(■Miration by UMyO, 



ONCE IN A LIFETIME 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 1 1 




H^SlI 



Kuhlman - Beadi 



Kitir Kuhlman, senior in biotogy, and 
KIley B«ach, K- State graduate, announce 
thtir engagement. 

Kat^ n the daughter of Gerry and 
Ann Kuhlnwn, Ness City, Kan, and Kiley 
ii theion o( Curtis and Mary Beach, 
Kensington, Kan. 

They plan a June 2 wedding in Ness 
City, Kan. 



Dinkel-Voth . 

[>enlseDmkel,;006K- State 
graduate, and ieremy Voth, senior in 
construction Kience and management, 
announce their engagement 

Denise Is the daughter of Ron and 
Vickie Dinkel, Emporia, Kan., and Jeremy 
Is the son ofVemey and lanlce Voth, 
Ooessel, Kan. 

They plan a May 26 wedding in 
EmpMia, Kan. 



Brodtsmith- Wright 

Tanya Amanda Brocfcsinith, tunlor In 
accounting, and Kelly Dean Wright, 2006 
K- State graduate, announce their 
engagement. 

Tonya Is the daughter oFTroy and 
Oianna Broclismlth, Junctktn City, Kan., 
and Dean is the son of Gary and Sheila 
Wright, Junction City, Kan. 

They planaJuly21 wedding In 
Junction City, Kan, 



(KHeil- Miller 

ShianneO'Neil, heshman in 
elementary education, and Brandon 
Mlllei, United States Army, announce 
their engagement. 

Shianne is the daughter of Terry and 
Margaret O'Nelt. Seattle, Kan., and 
Brandon Is the son of Robert and Michefe 
Ihome, Kelly, Kan. 

They plan a June 16 wedding in 
AxtdlKan. 



Schmttz - Kramer 

Sara Sthmiti, senior in public health 
nutrition and dietetio, and Bob Kramer, 
senior In agricultural technology 
management, announce their 
engagement. 

Sara Is the daughter Cyril and Joyce 
Schmitz, Bailey vllle, Kan., and Bob Is the 
son of Steve and Cathy Kramer, Coming, 
Kan. 

They plan a June }0 wedding in it 
Benedict Kan. 



Ruhnke- Browne 



Rose Ruhnke, senior In kinesiology, 
and Aaron Browne, senior In computer 
engineering, announce thek 
engagement 

Rose Is the daughter of George and 
Ywinne Ruhnke, Wichita, Kan., and Aaron 
Is the son ofWiH and Marilyn Browne, 
Wichita, Kan. 

They plan a July 7 wedding In 
Wkhlta, Kan. 




Mueller -Bartel 

Chelsea Mueller, 200SK State 
graduate working towards MA. In 
Clinical Psychology Washburn Unrversity, 
and Jonathan Barlel, senior in computer 
engineering, announce their 
engagement. 

Chelsea is the daughter of Maureen 
Masters, Topelta, Kan , and Jonathan is 
the son of Di. Richard and M5. Terry 
Bartel, Wichita, Kan. 

They plan an Oct. 6 wedding in 
Wkhlta, Kan. 



Bowles- Bauer 

Tamara Bowfes, 200S K-State 
graduate, and filake Bauer, 20O4 K-State 
graduate, announce their engagement 

Tamara is the daughter of Tom and 
Sharon Bowies, Augusta, Kan., and Blake 
IsthesonofKyle and Lisa Bauer, Clay 
(enter, Kan. 

They plan a May 19 wedding In 
Wichita, Kan. 



Smith - Bityeu 

Alyssa Marie Smith, sophomore In 
family and consumer science education, 
and Benjamin Dean Bilyeu, senior in 
psychology announce their 
engagement. 

Alyssa is the daughter of Doug and 
Shannon Smith, Hutchinson, Kan., and 
Benjamin is the son of Bob and Sharon 
Wehry, Hutchinson. Kan 

They plan a June 23 wedding In 
Hutchitison, Kan. 



Sowers - Greenstein 

Amy Sowers, sophomore In business 
marketing, and Matt Greenstein, junior 
In social wort, announce iheir 
engagement. 

Amy is the daughter of Paul and 
Diana Sowers, Spring Hill, Kan , and Matt 
is the son of Tetry and Barbara 
Greenstein, Wichita, Kan 

They plan an Aug. 4 wedding In 
Olathe, Kan. 



m te ® Lifetime 

engagements and weddings 



you can finally buy a book 

WORTH ITS PRICE 

^uiciAMPUS PHONE BOOK 

Onivei"^^ y ^^ ^^1^ j^ Kedzle 103 

8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon.-Fri. 



"She was a 
beautiful bridCe'' 

Once in a Lifetime, 

in the Collegian the first 
Friday of the month. 



To announce your milestone, visit Kedzie t03. 
To advertise, call S32-6S60. 



lIqht It up 

• receptions 

• ceremonies 

www.konsasdlsclockev.com 

• video projection 
• free travel 

785-565-8054 



('z)\SdQ^ to '.: Ufwtime — 




Everyone's doing il 



':!S12.6S<(l. 



WFOOlrNlGb ■ rORiKAIl;> ■ I'ARTIIS 
STUnFNT niSCOUNT AVAIIABIF 

www.skimaging.com 

785.248.1857 



^ Announce your ^Celebrating 

Big Day "; an 

in the coiieitian at ^Anniversaty? 

no cKargel 




^njoy your 

first dance 

tagetherl 

Call us for 

Prwate Baltroom 

ieisomi 



Getting 
Married? 



The 



C To place your free 
■V announcement, pick 

up a form in 103 
(y Kedzie or request a 
*' form through e-mail at 
c laMH ifi ed s^ iiub.kau.rdu 

OncT In A lirettniP 



ft 



^ J run* Ihr Aral Kriiiay of every (J 

C I mud be lubmittpd by noon, / 
• f two day* pHor'. y 




Hard Part w 

Finding gach Oth6 

Finding all Hie elegant ■ 
accessories you need at 
an affordable rate is easy 



* caiulclabrus • 



©mQ'h to a lifetime 



in the Collegian, 

the first friday 
of the month. 





1<< iKiiifi. the altnrdable moI 



[027 Porr RUey Blvd. 837*3350 www.atwoodr6ntaIs. 



Sdfa ChiU Commom-MantutbD 
r 785^-8636 or 88^2-7848 iww.boid4maMD 
Mod tfmi TThits 9:30110 to 7pm 
Fn&SatyOamtoBpm Sunday Ipin to 5pm 



Page 1 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGtAN 



veriise 



Friday, March 2, 2007 



118 KEDZIE' 785-532-6560 



&LSew<tBti^p4€ 

Stop [n i^ Sef Us! 
314 R.ynt?. ' Downtown * 785-776-6100 



Special Orders 
Welcome 




tQ)ini(s@ \m a Lifetime 

vngagamentf and w e d d i n g i 



"She was a 
beautiful bride." 



Once in a Lifetime, in the Collegian the first 
Friday ot the in o nth. 



Vern'sWcddins Cake Shop ^ . . ^ „ 

® - ^ Congratulatiom to all ^ 

6^«.iY<'S?/^;^v/ Wedding Cakes ^^. o/^o//r February 

ss\x\xHmema/e\cmp 'Wki Hride^ ami 

^Hff, .^ Grooms! 



UV iii.tfcf ,i(/ (•III lii/iiii'in 
iiikf.i i>f*i'sL*Ji'c's /riii*r ^xfiitiU 

tms.Hiust. I 



Ssll? A Special Day*.* 




Let us help you with 

your special day. Ask about 

our Wedding Discounts! 

Opttn Mon.'Sat. ft a.m.>T1 p.m. 
Corner of 1 2th & Laramie • Aggleville • 539-5269 




fQ dnnoufK« ywir mitt4tdr%». vktil Kedfie 103. To «cfv«rtlsa. Mil SSS-CSCO. 



Three Sisters' Desserts 

Deliciously-Designed- Desserts 



Wedding Cakes, 
Cheesecakes, 
Pies and more- 
Manhattan, KS 

(785)317-0799 



www.threesistersdesserts.com 

email: threesistersdesserts@yahoo.com 





Enrolling Now 

NAACAS Pivot Point Hair Desisin 

Federally Founded Financial Aid For Qualifvinis Students 



- 7 7G 4 704 



Qft Cer^ffeates 



Cruni's 



CLASSIFIEDS 



Classifieds contitiuc 
on the next pagt 





ot /ardine' 



LEAHN TO R.VI K -Stale 
nytng Club hilt hve air- 
ptartat and low«»l raiss 
Call 785-77e-17M. www - 
ksuMuJhsk 




Loal and found sdt can 
ba placed free fer three 
dayt. 



2.. 3 4flL'(lrL" ■ 

Studio, unri Lott 

Apartmems Available 



AIWewtorFnll?fX)7 

Apply At: 
532-3790 




Rent'A0 fumisfted 



Manhaltvi CITY Ordl- 
ninc* 4S14 iiiur*s av- 

ery parion equal opportu- 
nllylrvhouslngwkthoutdlB- 
ttnctton on account ot 
race, ten. famNtal italut, 
military tiatui. diaabUHy. 
relliiian. age. color, na- 
Uonal origin or ancMlrv. 
V1olatH>ni should be re- 
ported to the Director al 
Human Reaource* at City 
HaN. (7B5)SS7-2440. 




Advertise in 
the Classifieds 



MANHATTAN CrrV Ordi- 
nance 4614 a » urea ev- 
ery per ton equal apporlu- 
nlty In houdng tirtttioul dla- 
llnetlon on account ot 
race, «ai. familial atatua. 
mllllary tlatu*. dltabHlty, 
religion, age. color, na> 
tlonai origin or anceatry. 
VltMatlont ahauld be re- 
ported to the Director ot 
Human Reaource* at City 
Hali. lTiS>Sa7-2440. 

1 n 7 VAn lER New m 
electric Two-bedrooms, 
appliances furnished, no 
pels Close to campui 
766-539 1975 Of 
785-313 6292 

1219 KEARNEY. On«. 
bedroorri Juna. year 
lease Waler/ trash paid. 
Next to campus, off street 
partiing. No pets S350 
7BS-539-5136 
1219 KEARNEY TWO- 
BEDROOMS Augusl, 
year lease Water/ Irasfi 
paid. NsKl to can^pus. off 
street parking No p»\f 
$660 785-539 5136 

ALUANCE PROPERTY 
MANAGEMENT. One -bed - 

roorri Jun0. July. August 
785539-4357 www.reni- 
Utmcdm 



AVAIUBLE JUNE 1. one- 
bedroom, large, dean 
Onjy pay electricity. Small 
pels allowed Balcony, 
great location $570/ 
month 785-341-7269 

CLEAN TWO-BEDROOM 
in tour ptei with washer/ 
dryer in unit Water and 
trash paid No pets S500/ 
inonlh 795-539-2356 

ONE. TWO. lour, five-bed- 
room aparttnants/ houses 
for June and August 
leases 7S5-564-08S7 

ONE. TWO. Ihrae, and 
lour 'bedroom apartments 
Close to campus and ag- 
yieville Pariung and laun- 
dry. 785-539-5800. 

ONE TWO. three, tour, 
live, six bedroom aparl- 
menf houses nait to cam- 
pus Washer/ dryer, cen- 
iral air No Pata. 
7a>-537-70S0. 

onF THREE-BED- 
ROOMS, near campus 
Augusi lease, pets oK 
785-776-2051 

ON E - B E D R O M 
ACROSS the street from 
campus $425 par momh 
tMo pels Availabie June/ 
August 785-313-7473 

ONEBEDHOOM APABT- 
WENTS in quiet sli-plex 
at 1811 Plan. Avaasbia 
June tst. Unfurnished. 
contral air, periting. water 
and trash paid. No pets- 
$375 per month Cell KSU 
Fouixtation at 

785-532-7569 or 

785-532-7541 

ONE-BEDROOM TO llve- 
bedniiofTis Apartments, 
dufrienes and hoims 
Most close lo campus 
Some farther away June 
or Augusi leases Check 
out our website www.- 
emaraldpropartymanag- 
ment com or cal Emerald 
Property Managamerit 
78S-58T-9000 for more irv- 
formetton 

PARK PUkCE Apart- 
ments One- BadnMrna. 
Summer/ fall leasing PeU 
welcoma One- haff mite 
from KSU al Selh ChM 
and ClaflKi. 785-539-2951 




Apad- 



TWO-BEDROOfylt SPE- 
CIAL al Parii Place Apart- 
ments. $495 rent plus frae 
cable through July '07 
785-539-2951. 

TWO-BE GROOM, 
CLOSE to campus. Per- 
sonal washef/ dryer. I64S- 
$675/ month. 

7a5-341.*496. 

TWD-BEDROOM. many 
sixes and pncas. June ex 
August 785-341-0686. 

VERY NICE three-toed- 
room. Nro bath apartment. 
Tliree blodis to Aggievillt 
623 Fremont. Affordable 
utmiles. August 1 
785-313-1807 

WHY RENT WHEN VOU 
CAN BUV? Condos for 
sale Two and three-bed- 
room startirig «1 1112,850. 
coileglat*vllla.com 
785-537-2096. 

WILDCAT VILLAGE. Aval- 
atJie June or August four- 
bedroom, hivo bath, 
wastver/ dryer. slonn 
room. S140C Cable paKJ 
765-776-2425 or 

765-5e5-37ea. wWHVil- 
laga-rentals com. 



NOW LEASING 



PARK PLACE 
ments Two- 
Pels welcome. Sunvnar/ 
Fall leasing. Orw- half 
mile from KSU at Seth 
Chlkj and Ciafun 
785-539-2951 

THREE AND lour-tmt- 
room aperlmanta avait- 
Bbie In Augusi Close lo 
campus Water and trash 
paid Coin operated laun- 
dry 785-5377810, 
765-537-22K 

TWO. THREE and ifji 
bedrooms, ciosa to cam 
pus. central air. dislv 
wBsher. laundry 
Nopets. 765-53H)Mt. 



Spacious 
Duplexes 

Custom bijill wlh the 
K Slat» fltuMm 

in mind. 

E«ch diiplflv Ititurii wtlfc in 
Elo««fi, tllhiichiiii 
tppltincii, Aittiir/drytr. dH 
Slr«9l iptrk'ng. phQfii ■md 

roorn, licurrty Nohtifl^, trish 
gmj kiwn t«rt 

Sucurttf di^out^ittwiamfl 
ai arw mgntti's tirri Thfl 
IBRU ptnod btB»n« August I 

4 tMlroom*, 2 Battit 
t,300Sq.n. 
ONIV njiO/mo. 

J«rry, Na P«rt/ 



to C«m|Hir 



1420 

Becchwaoil TcrracH 

Nf wtr Apartment 
Lg. 2 & 3 Bedrooms 
1" Baths 
Washer/Dryer 
Energy Effli:lent 

Dn a Weeded 

Secluded 2 Acra Ltt 

wKh Crfek 



$740 & IBB^ 
J4H024 



I arge 3 EJedrooiTi Apts, 

Cambridge So'-hT'' 

Sai1tls,Uiriii 

i^r-tJblotiroo*' 



<9&]^(to(£lu 



S37*9064 

|W(«i.NM«inmw>fW>HI.(!p 



•2O00Coll«CaHla' 

'1114 FrMiKHit* 

•UtOMga* 



Pre-lease 

Today for 

Spring! 

Only A few 
homes remain 

Amenities: 
•Waiher/Oryers or 

hookups available 
•On Site Management 
•Oarages Availatile 
•Private Fitness Center 
•Storm Center 
•Peaceful Garden 

Setting 
•Enormoui Closets 

776 8080 

iwiiain«ari riariinTiri im 



Few Spices nemaki fcir 
•Sraduata Sludanli 
• Uoper Clsiimen 

Alfl*iirli*t 

■.lP(..J! 

* -J' '.<-u iA^iiliT ■ LlKIHMKd ClUeil 
•'''-.ilcFrlWil^tMa 



• ThK intMrariaiMiimi 
MuiiAMfCEitaMhiildU 
Uatome SevM n AMiili' 

• O^SiaMnpMmlliln 

• hA hm MMWaitt Pemni 
•WwEaaignirSMl 

na M Mn* !■•« M M Um^l 

WESTCHESratRUlK 
770-1118 






A BOOM 10 sublease 
Very low price. S220 per 
month Including utility 
taaa. 914 Bluemont Ave 
Near campus 

795-317-1734. 




F0Ufl-8E DROOM 
THREE balfu, Augusi, 
$1280. nkx. washer/ 
dri/er hookups, ofl-slreel 
pariting, great kicadon. no 
pets' smokmg. 

78S-532-82S6. 

LOOKING FOR three 
roommates in four-bed- 
room duplex 500 
Laramie $285 fier room. 
Washer/ Dryer. 
785-410-2916 or 
785-447-0862 

SIX AND fIve-bedroom 
house/ duplex, neid to 
campus Personal 

washer/ dryer, central air. 
ofl-atreat parking, no pets 
785-537-7050. 

THREE-BEDROOM 
UNIT, located at S/ 602 
North 51h No p«1«. $975/ 
morith. available June 1. 
785-564.0372. 



WALK TO class One. 
two. three, four-tiedroom: 
No smoiting. no drinking, 
nopals 785-539-1554 




1015 PIERRE Vary ntoe, 
lour -bedroom. Fenced ir 
back yard. Spaoous 
rooms. Washer/ dryer 
Jufy or Augusi lease Ml 
pea oonikleref) Chhs. 
785-770-2161- 

1310 H. im. Two-bod- 
room. June ieaaa. No 
pau, dOM 10 campus 
785-539-1975 or 

785^134292. 

1417 NICHOtS. four-bed- 
rooms, lamlly room 1909 
Kef^iiiar, three-bedrooms. 
Both two bathrooms, 
waihar/ dryer, garage 
game room, fenced yard/ 
pabO- 785-538-1177 

SOa FREMONT, three-bed- 
foom. one bath, no pets 
AvaHatil* June i 
785-539-1975 or 

785-313-6292. 




AVAILABLE JUNE 1- 
Three-bedroom house lo- 
cated at 1501 Harry 
Road. Two blocks west of 
campus, central air. 
washer/ dryer, fenced 
yard 785-539-3672 

CLEAN. QUIET basameni 
apartment. Two-badroom, 
two bath, lull Kitchen, ps- 
tk3. $385 pet month per 
person All utilities m- 
eluded emily1^'l(Su »du 

FIVE-BEDflOOM. JUNE 
lease Very close to cam- 
pus (westsidei Just pur- 
chased and very nk^l 
Central air. full i(ilchen 
(stove/ refngerator/ dish- 
washer/ disfxisal). pertlel 
kitchen (stove/ ralngera- 
tor). three baths, three liv- 
Ir^ areas. doutMe car 
garage No pets Call 
now. this will rem last 
785-539-4641 

FIVE-BEDflOOM, TWO 
bath house for rant 931 
Vamar June lease 
Washer/ dryai. window air- 
condllioomg Fenced back- 
yard, pais aSowad Off 
street parking $1500/ 
monlh 785-539-4949 

FIVE BEDROOM JuHe! 
July Augusi Alliance 
Properly Management 
785-538-4357 www rent- 
•pmcom 

FOR RENT Newer lour- 
bedroom duplex Good ki- 
calkin with diahwaahef, 
wasnar and dryer No 
pets $1160 

785-537-7597 

FOUR TO live-b»drooms, 
two bath, washer/ dryer, 
central air. dishwasher 
Ckise to campus 
765-532-9564 

FOUR BEDROOM AND 
six -bedroom houses 

Ckise to campus and Ag- 
gievitle Parking and laun- 
dry 785-539-5800 

FOUFI -BE DROOM. ONE 
bath house for rant 900 
Valtier June lease 
Wbiher/ dryer, central air- 
condlHoning. Fenced back- 
yard, pets ahowad. $1200/ 
(north Party shack and 
garage ItKluded. 

765-539-4949 

FOUI^-BEDflOOM, TWO 
and one hatf bath, study 
August 1 S975 per 
month Knight Real Es- 
tate Call 785-539-5394 

FOUR-BEDROOM. TWO 
t>ath. nica sued bed- 
rooms Central air. two 
car garage, washer/ dryer 
No pels/ smoking $1400/ 
month, avallabki in Au- 
gust 1420 Visia lane, 
hwo and ona haN bkMka 
from camput. 

316-680-1709 

FOUR-BEOROOM. TWO 
bath, two kllcFiens, close 
to campus. 785-341-9459. 



FOUR-BEDROOM. 
JUNE. July. August Al- 
llanca Proparty Manage- 
meni 785-539-4367 www,- 
fBOl-aprtLMfn 

NICE FIOUSE at 1010 
Leavenworth Two full 
baths, all kitchen appli- 
ances including washar/ 
dryer Upstairs tms own 
heat and air. and has )ust 
been remodaled Plenty ol 
padting off alley, no pets, 
June lease. Call Dave, 
7SS-292-4;j20. evenings, 
785-292-4342 

NICE TWO- BE DROOM 
Ckise to campus Avail - 
able June 1. SS90 
7BS-7127257 

ONE HOUSE: 2031 
Tecumseh Four-tMd- 
loom. two bath. June 1 
lease Two. hail -duplexes, 
with four-tiedroom. two 
bath, washer/ dryer in- 
cluded. SI 200/ month, no 
pels 785 539-2357 or 
785-341 8576 

ONE TO live-bedroom 
apartments and houses 
Close to campus 
785-539-1975 or 
765-313-8292 

ONE -BE DROOM TO live- 
bedrooms Apartments, 
duplexes and homes 
Most ckise to campus. 
Some farthei away Jurte 
or Augusi leases Check 
out our websde www < 
emeraldpropertymanag- 
ment com or call Emerald 
Proparty Management 
7B5-587-90O0 lor more in 
lormstion 

SEVEN TO eightbadrciom 
(two tcilcben). Juno. July. 
Augusi Alliance Properly 
Management 
785-539-4357 wwwrenl- 
apmcom 

SIX-BEDROOM (TWO 
iiitchen) June July, Au- 
gust Alliance Property 
Management 
765-539-4367 www.ranl. 
apm com 

SPACIOUS FOUR-BED 
FIOOM, two bath 
Washer/ dryer, nice 
kitchen Near City Park. 
Available May 1 SHOO/ 
month plus utiiltles 
765-313-1886 

STUNNING HOUSE Four- 
tiedroorrvs three balh- 
rooms, big family room, 
plus office, fenced yard, in 
a nice quiet west neighlwr- 
hood. Close lo aly parks 
AvaitaUa now 11350. wa 
let and gartiage included 
call 765 31 7 493 7 
THREE. FOUR. FIVE, SIX 
PLUS BEDROOMS Looii 
mg for ihat perfect home 
to rent? Great selection 
and prtce* C^slona 
Mariagement 
785-341-0686 

THREE- FIVE-BED- 

ROOMS, near campus 
Auguat lease, pets oil 
786-776-2061, 



THREE-BEOROOM- 
HOUSE at 1721 Anrtef.. 
son AvoHaUa June i . Un- - 
fumiahad. o)l-«(re«t fi«r^ 
ing. S750 par month CaH 
KSU Foundalkm a^ 
785-532-7569 or 

785-532-7541 

THREE-BEDROOM, ON>- 
full bath $8t0. 917 Blu^, 
mont. year lease, June 
2007 - May 2008. Ck>A 
to campus. Pets alk>we<f' 
Mrs. Km. 913-681-9959. 

THREE-BEDROOM 
JUNE, July August A^ 
llanca Proparty Manag*- 

m«it 785-539-435 7. www ■ 
reni-apm,eom 

TWO-BEDROOMS 1' 
JUNE. July Augusi 1^1- 
llanco Proparty Martag*- 
maol 785-539-4357 www. 
renl-apm.com 

VERY CHARMING brtOt 
ranch 2505 Winny Three- 
bedroom. snachM 
garage, quiet neightior- 
hiood No pets, S9S0 
Juna 1 lease Ry^ 
Ftemals, 765-313-0455. 

785-776-7706 

VERY NICE lour-bedroom 
one bath hiouse Three 
tifcicks fnjm campus 2038 
Cotiege View Fencck) 
yard. June 1 lease 
785-313-1807 

VERY NICE four bed- ■ 
room. Ckise to campus^ 
Available August \f 
$1340 785-712-7257 



WILDCAT 

PROPERTY 

MANAGEMENT 
537-2332 

8*&Moro 

2eR S850 
3BR- 51,300 
4BR 5),700 

l4*&fr«nofit -- 
4BR 2'/j Bolh 
$1,650 

Anderson Vttbge 

16R- $525 
2BR $700-725 



1501 Pbyntz 
Hewse $750 
3BR 2 Bold 



1 509 Poynti 

House $600 

I BR I Both 



315P«ynti 
IBR $650 



Fall Leasing 



r 

-* — 



(^assifteds continue 
fgt>m the previous page 



CLASSIFIEDS 



To piace an advertisement cail 



Friday, March 2, 2007 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGtAN 



Page 1 3 



I _L I I I I I I 
I I I •• 






i I • I II ■ 
I j I ■ I • ■ 



LET'S RENT 




iris roVNTZ, two-bad- 
nwmi acrou rrom city 
ftm*. wlt^ ofl-str»«l park- 
ind. Cwit/al ai(. waB^of' 
dryer Nsutrsl cotora witti 
total ra-nwcM. Water and 
t^as^ patd June lease. Mo 
pets 78S-313-4ai2, 

1«I» FAIRV1EW. Outet 
one-tiedroom |t400) and 
Siudlo |i375^ near KSU. 
Laundry. Walet. tr*s^ 
pak) fki peti. no amok- 
ing 1 JUNE. 

S30-342-1121. 

350 N letti Two blockt 
10 K-State and Agglavtlla. 
two-tMdroom apartmenls 
Clean, quiet, private par^i- 
ing- No smoking, no pets. 
tSSO Jufte and Auguat 
leases 7B5-539'£5()B or 
785-564-0857 

FOUfl- BEDROOM, otMe 

lo c«mpu8. c«ntral air, 
dishwaahar. No peta 
Avatlabia June or August 
785-539-086e. 

JUNE LEASE two-bed- 
room apartn^em Walk to 
campus Excallwn coodi- 
mnl kication Wo JlWett.' 
1 8 niKs LAia...£.<Liii 

785-410-2814 

LARGE TWO-BEOflOOM 

ck^sn. close lo campus. 
Bill* p«M. 785-762-7191 

LUQE TWO-BED- 

ROOM, avalable June. 
Bucony. tlraptace and 
Very cloae to 
Call 
7aS-31 7-3780 Uave 



PRE-LEASING JUNE and 

Auyuil- Soma units tfrarxl 
new, doae to KSU, 
wwhar/ dryer irvcluded 
CHI lor detaiii 

7iS-77«-Zt02 youngwilk- 
aiSy^tod.com, wwwwltk- 
saptB.com 



Sole-Houses 



CONDOS FOR SALE. 

Two and thrae-bedroom 
lUiting at 1112.850 oo<le- 
glatevlMaCOm 
7eS-537.2096 




CHRISTIAN FEMALE 

seeks two female gradstu- 
dents starting (all 2007. 
August to May ^asa. New 
three-bedroom, two tratt> 
holjse w4th waafierr dryer. 
$3S0 pKjs one-thtrd utili- 
ties Call 847-975-1484 

FEMALE HOUSEMATE 
Na drinking/ smoking. 
Si^Sl month One-ttilrd 
utilities, washer/ dryer. Au- 
gust lease. ami- 
ca313Skau.edu. 
785-537-1464 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted through July Two- 
bedroom dupiek Washer/ 
dryer, and storage. Rent 
and utilities negotiable 
Cail Amanda at. 
91 3-21 6-4838. 

LOOKING FOR temsle 
roommates for a tour-bed- 
room house Moor monlti 
plus electricity, gas artd 
sec. 785-587-9207 or 
785-230-3008. 

MALE. WALK to class, all 
turTiist>ed, lower level, 
washer dryer without me- 
ter No smoking, drinking, 
pets, 785-539-1554. 

ROOMMATE NEEDED 
until May 31. Rent $275/ 
nionlh ptus one-fourth utik. 
ues Waaher/ dryer, dfsh. 
washer ^ houaa. Call 
785-537-3737, 

ROOMMATES NEEDED 
iQr two bedrooms In five- 
bedroom houstr Negri laU 
Ctose to campus Outitoor 
pets wetcome 

620-382- 7S4t. 

ROOMMATES NEEDED 
two tJedrooma in sii -bed- 
room house two bkicks to 
cMrripus, three blocks 
Vtlle. CsJI Kylle 

913-775-0465 




HOUSE SEVEN minutes 
(rbm campus S200.00 per 
monlh CaH 

913~M1-5S29 

StjBLEASER NEEDED 
for Sprlrtg 2007 semester 
JS15/ monlh Four-bed- 
reom apartment Firat 
monlh'a rant pak), cheap 
utIMjei. 913-495-2556 or 
913.4O6-1034. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE 
One-bedroom, S390 plus 
uuiiues. CkMe to Ag- 
glevilla. pela aSowed 
913-9eO-5<61. 



THREEBEOHOOM WITH 
pon:h and sunroom, S11 
Bluamonl. August 1 lease, 
laundry mduded, no pets, 
1945 plus irtliillea, 
7BS-3 1 3-0482. leave rrws- 
sage 

TWO AND three-bad- 
room. Ck>sa to camixis. 
Central air, dishwasher, 
c6n operated laundry fa- 
cility Avallatile June or 
August No pels. 

785-537-1746 or 

785-539-1545. 





IM1 KEARNEY Four- 
Bedroom, also have 
Three, Five. Sin and 
Seven-Bedroom hiouses. 
All JUNE 1 rentals Pels 
OK 785-317-7713. 

■res— H0BBCCr~5J4 

Fraamont, 1118 Ratons , 
lour-bedroom, hwo bath, 
washer/ dryer. dish- 
washer, central air. 
tllSO - SI30a Doug, 
785-313-5573 

13M PIERRE, TnO 

Ponwroy, SHOO - Si 200. 
Four-bedroom, two bath, 
washer/ dryer. dlsh- 
wastwr, central air. Au- 
gust leu*. 765-31 3-5573, 
Doug, 




THE COLi-EGIAN canrrat 
varify ttw nnaneW pMMV 
tial ot advarttaamwiti In 

(tM EmploymenVCarMr 
elaasincatton. Raadera 
are advlaad lo approach 
arty auch buainet* oppor- 
tunity wrttti raa- 
aortable cau- 
tion. The Collegian urgea 
our raadera lo contact the 
Betlaf Bualneaa Bureau, 
SOI SE Jafferaort, 
Topaka, KS <S«a7-l1M. 
(785)232- 0454. 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSIS- 
TANT- Networks Plus. Ihs 
leader in provkling busi- 
ness computer services, 
has a hill-time position 
available in Manhattan, 
KS This challenaina PO*'- 
tkin requires the ability lo 
handle multiple taiks and 
pnontles while maintain- 
ing a positive and enar- 
geUc attttude $12/ hour, 
tun- time only, opportuni- 
ties lor advancerrKml E- 
mall resume in Microsoft 
Word or tekt fo-rmal lo: )ot>- 
s @networksplU5 com 

AS NEEDED JUVENILE 
INTAKE AND ASSESS 
MENT OFFICER. Riley 

County Community Cor- 
rscltons IS accapling appil- 
callons lor several as 
needed, on-csll juvenile in- 
take and assessment otfl- 
cars Minimum require- 
ments iridude a high 
school diptoma Hourly 
rale lor i^l-out duty la 
110. On -call reimburse- 
ment I* t30/ day Onfall 
olBoert twrk a rotaUng on- 
calJ achadule, with the 
usual aehedule being one 
weak of on-call duty every 
8- 10 weeks Lav* enforce- 
mant expenence or direct 
aapehence working with 
Juveniles n preferred 
Valid driver's Hcensa ana 
BbilHy to work flexible 
hours i» mandatory Appli- 
caHons can t>e obtained 
from Riley County Clerk's 
Offk^, 110 Courttxiuse 
Plaia, Manhattan. KS 
68502, or visrt our web 
site, www,rllaycountyKi.- 
gov Riley County is an 
equal opportunity am- 
pkiyar 



nil WHARTON Manor 
Road, tour-bedroom lower 
level duplei wtth neutral 
colors, two baths, washer/ 
dryer himlshed. 817 V«l- 
tlar, three-bedroom teiwer 
level duplex with new car- 
pet, neutral cotors and 
washer/ dryer hook-ups. 
Very reasonabiB renl with 
greet space in both du- 
plexes. June tease. No 
peta. Call 785-31 3-481 2 



1S3S CAMPUS Road. 
Four bedroom, two baths. 
Central air. washer/ dryer 
furnished. Neutral color* 
with nice, new tuths, 
Larg* badrlMma lor an al- 
tordable price. June 
leaia. No pala. 
785-313-4618 

SOON, nth On City Park. 
Two large, sunny thrae- 
t>edroom ($750). Laundry. 
Water, trash pakl, f«} 
pats, no smoWng. 1 JUNE 
and t AUGUST 
530-3*2-1121. 

820 OSAGE. t524 Pipher. 
3100 Jernes, all tour-b*^ 
rooms, two bath Jiina 1, 
785-317-7713. 

A SIX or a«van-b«droom 

house, three bathrooms. 
Two blocks to KSU June 
I 785-317-7713 

BEAUTIFUL REMOD- 
ELED homea 18t2, 1614 
Pierre, four- five-bednxim, 
hMo bath, fresh oarpaV 
paint. New Mtchien, bath. 
iTXKlem apptances. Ckisa 
lo campus Move In June; 
August. 7»S-304-0387 

BRITTNAY RIOOE town 
houM four/ live-tJedroom, 
two and one-halt balhs, in- 
cludes appliances, 
washer/ dryer No pets 
Available August t 
316-393-9628 

FIVE-SEDROOM 

HOUSE Walk ID campus 
Two kitchens, flraplaeas, 
central air, neutral cotors. 
waslier/ dryer lumlshed, 
garage. iaiam mainle- 
nani^. June lease. No 
pets Call 78 5- 3 13-481 2 

FIVE-BEDROOM TWO 

bath June lease, washer, 
dryer, dishwasher, central 
air Si 400 00/ month. 
7SS-3t3-SS73 Doug 



NEW USTttK). avaMable 
June 1. Four to live-bed- 
room house k>caied aaat 
ol Aeglevlile at a» 
Uramla. Two battt, 
warier/ dryer. dlsh- 
waaber, centraJ air Lease 
dapoaH plus utiltles. 
7»S-539-3672 

NEITT TO campus, one 

through six-badrcom 

houses, and apartments. 
Washer/ dryer, central air. 
Available rxm or lall No 
pats 7»g-»3T-TOSO. 

ONE AND Ihrea-lMd- 



soWMse 



SUMMER SUBLEASE 
two-bedroom, one bath 
$430/ month plus utilities 
785-643-1923, 
785-577-4451 

TWO-BEDROOM APART- 
MENT, walk to campus. 
S620/ month includes utili- 
ties. 785-275- 1409 leave 
message 



TWO-BEDROOM 

meni apartment Washer' 
dryer. No pets. $600/ 
month. Cha^ utlHIIw. 
Available August 1. 1211 
Thurston 785-868-3471 
call altar 
7p.m. 

TWO-BEDROOMS, One 

balh. attached Otrtf*. 
Central air. appliances, 
washer/ dryar. No pats. 
August, 1730 

786-537-8420. 
785-341-5346 



lOTPinir 



MIL^KmJu- 



Help Wanted 



ASSISTANT COOROINA- 
TOR: KANSAS STATE 
UNIVERSITY, New stu- 
dent servk^s. Job require- 
ments: bachekirs degree, 
aicallerTl written and ver- 
bal communk^tkHt skilli, 
excetlant organliattonal 
skUts. ability lo multt-task 
and work in a last-paced 
environment, experience 
in eveni planning and co- 
ordinal kin. denKinstratad 
proliciency in multiple 
computer programs (in- 
cluding MS Office Suite), 
applk:at>le expenence 
with CRM software includ- 
ir>g knowledge oi data Fil- 
ters. The successful indi- 
vidual win be salt-moti- 
vated, have a team att- 
tude and t>s commuted to 
a constituent- driven ser- 
vice phikjsophy Salary 
rango of 129,000 to 
$34,000 Posrtion avail- 
able June 1, 2007 Sand 
letter ol application, re- 
sume or vrta and contact 
information lor three work- 
related references to 
Search Committee KSU. 
New Student Services. 
122 Anderson Hall, Man- 
hattan, KS 66506 Screen- 
ing wHI begin March 9 and 
continue until position is 
filled KSU is an Equal Op- 
portunity Empkjyer and ac- 
tively seeks diversity 
among Its emptoyeas. 
Pakl lor by KSU. 

BANK TELLER ImmwJi- 
ate opening lor tull-Ume 
front line and/ or drive- up 
teller Looking tor outgo- 
ing, energetic, prolas- 
sWnal, aarvica ohemad 
paraon. Prior bank or 
casli handling experience 
IS a plus but not retfuired 
Forty hour work week. 
Great fxiurs. Great t3er>e- 
lits Apply at Kansas State 
Bank. 101 D Waatkwp, 
Manhattan Equal Oppor- 
tunity Employer 

BARTErgoiNG! $300 a 
day potential. No experi- 
aiKe necessary Training 
provkted Call 

1-800965-6520 6x1 144 

COMPLETE OUTDOORS 
IrK. seeking all posilione 
In larvdscape, irrigation, 
end rruintanance. 
785-776-1930 

DISC JOCKEY Are you a 
people person^ Do you 
want to earn extra money 
while actually having htni 
www.KBniasdii ejochiy. ■ 
«Hn/d|. 



Wp Wanted 




iielp Vvanted 
section 




washer/ dryer Near cam- 
pus and city park. August 
1 785-532-9564 

ONE-BEDROOM FULL 
bath, washer' dryer, no 
smokers 515 Valber, 
1340 plus utilities August 
IMBa. Call Monday - Fh- 
day 785-776-4805 

THREE-BEDROOM TWO 

bath, washer/ dryar, no 
smokers. 515 Valuer, 
#825 plus utilities. Auguat 
laaaa Call Monday . Fri. 
day. 785-778-4805 

THREE-BEDROOM TWO 

bath 1205 1207 

Pomeroy June lease, 
washer, dryer, dish- 
wssfier, central air 
S105000/ month 

785-313-5573 Ooug. 



EASTER HELP needed si 
Manhattan Town Center 
iocatkxi. Manager pay 
$455/ week. Easter Bunny 
$850/ hour Call Becky 
1-800-422-8967 

FOUR LANDSCAPING po- 
sitions available Downey- 
Lawn, ixim k>oking lor hwo 
college summer interns 
that want a ureer In the 
horlKulture mdusby and 
two part Ume workers. 
Housing Included Prefer- 
ring well rounded indivkJu- 
als with an imaginatkiin, 
tktve. and stMlity lo work 
fvard Apply in person or 
Call Nalhan Downey loH 
Iree 1 -866-794- 

UAWN(5296). Se« 

OowneyLawn.com for 
more details Oovmey 
Lawn & Landscape, PO 
Box t, 303 E Soule In- 
galis. KS 67853 
HARVEST HELP wanted 
Late May through August. 
Pays well 785-587-1956, 

evenings 

HAY COMPANY In search 
of summer workers, farm 
experience needed Excel- 
lant wages. 785-564-2590. 

HORTICULTURAL SER- 
VCES, Inc. Is seeking reli- 
able, mollvatsd Indivklu- 
als lor fun-time or part- 
time seasonal positions In 
our retail garden center. 
Above average wages 
commensurate wrih expe- 
nence and abfiHies Apply 
in person at 11524 LJrid- 
scape Lane, SI George, 
Kansas 785-494-2418 or 
78S-776-0397 

HOWE LANDSCAPE Inc. 
has several positions 
available lor our landscap- 
ing, imgatkm and mowmg/ 
mainlenanca crews. T>ils 
is lor fuH time and part 
time help, with flexible 
schedules for itudanit, 
prelerably tour hour 
bkx^s of Kme Appteanls 
must be 18 years or age 
and have a valid dnvers li- 
cense Slarting wage Is 
$8.00/ hour. Apply three 
ways, in peraon MoriMy 
through FrkHy it 127M 
Madison Rd In RIty; Cfl 
785-485-2857 to Obtain 
an appMcallon; or e-mal 
US at tKnfekBnit*8hanua^- 
n«t. 

JOIN THE K- SI ale Online 
team at the Office of Medi- 
ated Educatkin, and con- 
trtNile to a vanety of im- 
portant K- State web sites 
and applk:atkins. Candi- 
dates must be moUvsled, 
capable of learning new 
skills quk:k^, self-di- 
rected, able 10 work al 
ieasl IS hours a week, 
and willing to devote at 
least a year to the posl- 
tkm Working with web 
technologlea ki an office 
that vakjes rts stuckirrls 
provMas a fun yet chal- 
lenging work envlranmanl 
Slartkig wages begm at 
$7.00. For rmrs informa- 
lk)n email us at omaol- 
lioeVksu.edu. 



KITCHEN HELP 
Starting pay. $8 50/ hour 
Apply at 808 North 12th 
St., Manhattan, KS. 

LUNCH WAIT staff 
wanted. Good pay. Apply 
at 808 North 12th Sl, 
Manhattan, KS. 

LUNCH HOOW PLAY- 
GROUND SUPERVI- 
SORS Immedlata open- 
ings- Manhattan- Ogden 
Elementary Scnoois. 
Se 50 par hour one end a 
tialf- IWD fnurs per day 
11:00 am- tM) p m. Ap- 
pllcabon available at www.- 
utd383 org'Dlstrlct/Hu- 
manResources/ or apply 
at Human Resourcas De- 
partment. 2031 Poynti Av- 
enue. Applk^Mons ac- 
cepted until posHkins are 
niled. Apply to Manhattan - 
Ogden USD 383. 2031 
Poyntt Avenue, Manhat- 
tan, KS 86502. 
785-S87-2000. Equal Op- 
podunlty Employer. 

MAIL center; duplk^al- 
Ing student help needed 
on campus. Freshman or 
sopfiomora status pre- 
terred with ability to work 
spnng, summer, and fall 
semesters, as well as 
breaks Duties Inchide: 
campus delivery route, 
preparatkm and handling 
Of mall, and copy jobs 
Computer skills berwhcM 
and some heavy lifting re- 
quired. Must have a valid 
driver's Ikwnse. Our on 
campus onice operates 
Monday- Fhday, 8a.m - 
Sp.m. and la eager to 
work around your sched- 
ule Please apply ki per- 
son at 13 Cotiege Court 
BuiMkig. Division ol Con- 
tkiulng Educatnn, 

785-532-6988 

MANHATTAN COUNTRY 
Club is seeking pan- lime 
t>ag roorrV cart staff. WW 
work with your class 
actwdula. Must be avall- 
alile nwel weekends. Call 
78S-e3»-«221 ask tor 
Jaeque or Jeff 

OMALLEY'S NOW HIR- 

\Na WAIT STAFF 1208 

Mora. Manhattan, KS 
785-537-0775. 

PINNACLE ELECTRIC 
has an immediate open- 
ing tor 30-40 hours a 
week. Electik:al experi- 
ence a pkis, but wM train 
nght parson. Call 
786-456-1 3St. 

PLAY SPOHTSI Have 
lunl Save rnor>eyl Maine 
carnp needs lun loving 
counsetors to teach All 
land, aitventura and water 
sports. Great summerl 
Call 888-844-8080. apply: 
campcadarcom 

PROGRAMMER- CIVIC- 
PLUS is the nattons lead- 
ing provkler of City, 
Crxinty, and School web- 
sites. Full-time poslbon in 
Manhattan MktosoU ASP 
and SOL expenence re 
quired. $15 50' hour plus 
lirrw end a half for over- 
time Berietlta include 
Healtfi, Dental, Pakt Holi- 
days, Pax) Vacabon, and 
40 IK matching. Email re- 
sume In Mk^rosofl Word or 
lexl tormat to |ot>s<9clvlc- 
plus.com. 



PROJECT MANAGER 
QvKPhis hias an openkig 
In our Manhattan head- 
quarters olflee lor a tuK- 
thne pro^ martager 
This challenging poslUon 
anlaHs manaoing multiple 
wsbalte redaatgn projects 
Irom start to flfllah Posl- 
tkm requires attentton to 
dateil, the ability to man- 
age multiple tasks, prkm 
lies and deadlines and a 
cheerful attitude Training 
It provkled. Banefit* m- 
cKide health, dental, pak) 
holklays, paM vocalton 
and 401 (k) matching 
EmaH resume in lext or 
Word format to 

lobsO cMcpkjs.oom . 

PROJECT MANAGER. 
CIvlcPkji has an opening 
in our Manhattan head- 
quarters oince for a full- 
Ume Pro^ Manager 
This Challenging posllkin 
entails managing rrHjItiple 
websHe redesign projects 
Irom start to linisb. Posi- 
tkm raquiiws attantton to 
dalak. the atHllty to man- 
age multiple task, prkMl- 
tles and deadlines and a 
cheerful attttude Training 
is provided Benefits in- 
Ck>de Health. Dental. Pak) 
HoMaya, Paid Vacation 
and 401 (k) matching 
Email resume m lext of 
Woft) fonnat to ^abaO- 
ctvKpkiS.com 

RILEV COUNTY has thlr- 
teen posHtone tot sea- 
sonal laborers Forty hour 
work week at $666 per 
hour. Valkl dnver's ik^nse 
and the ability to Hfl 70 
pounds is required, Appli- 
canls rnust be at least 18 
years okl. Ekpertencs in 
conabucUon, concrete 
woik, aspfiah mainle- 
nanca, tralfk: Daggnig 
free and furl maintenance, 
or mowing is preferred 
Applications are available 
at the Riley County 
Clark's Offk:e, 110 Court- 
house Ra/a. Manhattan. 
KS or online at www niey- 
oounlyksgov/jotM. Appli- 
caHona wi be accepled 
unM all posKtons are filled 
Rilay County is an equal 
oppodunty amptoysr. 

SEVERAL POSITIONS 
available for liek) techni- 
ciana working with gresler 
praide chickens in 
Kansas These positions 
are klaai lor anyone inter- 
ested in graduate school 
lor wikllile biology Will be 
nnaan to thirty hours per 
weak starting immedi- 
Btely Pay is S6 25 per 
hour An interested per 
sons please sertd resume 
end cover letter via e-mait 
lo gregolajiSksu.edu Or 
call 785-532-6413 

SO LONG Saloon now hir- 
ing waitresses Apply in 
person, 1130 Moro 

SPEND YOUR summer 
vacalkin traveling the 
country as a c^mibine/ 
thick driver. Ambitious in- 
divklualt for high volume 
harveallng oparalioh Op- 
erate new JD97eO STS 
and Petertiilt Semis Guar 
anteed excellent monthly 
wages and room and 
board Sign on bonus lor 
experienced workers. Ap- 
proximately mkJ-May to 
rrw)-Augusl Snail Harvest- 
ing 1-888-287-7053. 





NOW HIRING! 

Management 



Arf yau canfickni. poiJciVf. Ufa pir^ 

Ikffrr Vtnf^t ^ Mwhimn n%4 luncnon Ctit 
dfir toflturv ^ muh wtmtiHj indljwKlujh to p<ni 
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Wr Will tr#n ttw ri^t >irHliv»dkul Itoti tht |raund floor up 



And lift tvprrlcnci W# v9 wrilhr^ti? fuy IhF fnoil iot Etw bm 



4atti JMptit^ filMi mim 9iiri wm$mi§ ilfn ifcwf toffi 

S fimy Work Wrrt 

Mstrukfy M- AmMMl Bsmu ftngr^m 



eWlllMMMI IW i||i >nW H|i n p<p|^n..<w KM 




NOW HIRIN(; - TWO LOC'ATIONS 



ABOVE AVERAGE COMPENSATION 

• Discuunted Meals 

• Flexible Schedule 

• Crew Incentive Programs 

• Medical Insurance 

• RctiFement Plan 



iO[)\\ 'WORK TOD V\ 



421 N .itdSireei 

.KMIfi AndcrHin Ave. 

EOE/Dnig Free Wort^'.acc 



SUMMER INTERNSHIP WILDCATSNEEDJOBS - 

He^! me nin n^ buskiecs. COM. PAID auniey takers 

Open to an m«|ors. Fhra needed ki Manhatlan. 

piJsMons BvaHabla, aver- 1 00*^ free to Join Click on 

age earns $800/ week, surveys 
Call 785 -3 1 7-0^56 



THE CITY of Weatmore- 
land la taking appUcaHon* 
for a pool manager tor the 
2007 season Ufa guard 
and WIS training pre- 
ferred bul not requked. 
Salary based on experi- 
ence and <i nagoVaUa. 
Job descrtptton and appK- 
cation avallabis al Clly 
Hall. PO Box 7. Wssl- 
moretand. KS 66549. 
785-457-3381. Oeadlir« 
tor appitoattona n March 
16th Equal Opportunity 
Emptayer 

THE SALTY Rim NOW 
HIRING WAIT STAFF 
1204 Moro Manhatlan, 
KS 785-537-6910. 

TWO OPENtNOS tor Slu 
deni Computer Operator. 
Applk^tkms are availablB 
in room 014 Haki Utirary 
For further intormatton, 
http : //www. k . state .edu/ct . 
sJBmptoyment/ or can Op- 
erBlk>nsat7e5-5324941 

UNIQUE OPPORTUNFTV: 

Every two years MGM 
Marketing, Inc. accepts 
appllCaUons to fin a Mar- 
kating A Logistics positktn 
within our sntall group m 
Kansas City MGM is in a 
nKhe market that recov- 
ers and re- sens an types 
ol products that are in- 
volved in derailments 
MGM is currenHy boking 
tor a creatrya. rnobvaled, 
detail-oriented person Biat 
has common sense, good 
|udgm«ht, and Uw ability 
to communicate welt with 
new and exislmg cus- 
tomers Prior experience 
IS not nscessvy This is a 
very good opportunity with 
a highly respected com- 
pany. Cur group members 
are paid very well Posi- 
tion includes most bene- 
fils and requires very litde 
travel If you are Inter- 
ested please forward a 
resume as soon as possi- 
tjle Our contact informa- 
tion and rrxire details 
about MGM may be lound 
art our website at www - 
mgmbusinsssparlnars - 
com MOM Is now 
scheduling appdntmsnts 
to conduct interviews. 



WINTER/ SPRING Posi- 
tions Available Earn up to 
$150 par daiy. Expanance 
not required Undercover 
Shoppers needed to ludQ* 
retail and dining establtoh- 
rnams CM 800-7^-4791 




Open M.itkfl 




COMPLETE GATEWAY 
peisonal computer sys- 
tem Includes cokir 
pdrter Good wortdng con- 
dDton $400 or best otter 
Mike. 78e-S64-1IM0. 




SET OF off road wheels 
and tires for Toyota truck. 
Mickey Thompson Classk; 
Lock Wheels- 15x10 
Tires are Good Year 
Wrangler MT/R 31x1 0.50 
$500 OeO 316-304-5852 




2004 YAMAHA 600R 
Excellent condilton. Beau- 
tiful bhia and white with 
matching helmet Low 
miles. Yoshi Pipe, fender 
kit, cover. 15500 or best 
olfei. 620-406-6442 




(Ol 



Burger King K lecking high -energy people lo join our 

reitaurant family It you are Keking a potiiion rhit 

c4n offer a growth ladder leading to management dnd 

i volld benefit package, please come complete an 

application. We are takiryg application for all shifts 

Wp offer; 

a Competiliiv slarUng wagei 

a Paid i'acallon program far all itaffmemberM 

• 1/2 prkf on 'off duty meats 

a Frer uniform! 

a frrtfuent performance/talary evatuatiota 

a hieiihte sihfduting 

e rurlfon rFimburiemrrtl program 

e Hetiri'ment program 

e Saiilrtgf bond punhase progrttm 



Pregnancy 
Testing Center 

539-3338 



5u|do|ku 

Fill in the grid so that every row, 

every column, and every 3x3 box 

contains the digits 1 through 9 

with no repeats. 



r^- 



4 8 9 

6 
1 



6 5 
2 

9 1 



1 7 
9 
2 3 



7 
9 



1 
9 
2 6 8 



Solution and tips 
at www.sudoku.com 



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Dvadlinei 



Claitihed ads muit b« 
plated by noon the day 
before you want your ad 
to rui^ Cletiified ditplay 

adi mint bt placed by 
4p.m twro vworking days 

prior to the data you 

warn your ad to run. 

OIU7«S~S32 6SSS 

BimM fcewai I Ilia 




Classified Rates 



I DAY 

lOvrordi or l«i 

110.50 

Mcb word over 20 

20( per word 

2 0A« 

20 wwreh or let! 

tU.9S 

each word over M 

25f per Moid 

3 DAYS 

20 vMMds or leM 
I1S6S 

each word over 10 
30f per word 

4 DAYS 

20 wordi 01 last 

11790 

each word over J9 

lU per wort) 

SO*Y$ 

lOwonteOr l«a 

120.00 

each word over 10 

40( per word 

(coniecutiv* ttay rate) 



To Place An Ad 



Go 10 Kedile 103 (acrou 

from the K-Stat* 

Student Union.) Office 

hours are Uorhday 

through Friday from 

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How To Pay 



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paid in advance unl««i 

you have an account 

with Student 
Fublicationi Inc Cath, 

check, MasterCard Or 
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There n a t2S lervica 
charge on all returr>*d 
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rigfvt to edit, reject or 
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Free Found Ads 



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run found ads tor threa 

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Corrections 



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your ad. pleat* tilt ut. 

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only for the tlrst wrong 

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before your ad has 

expired, we will lefurHl 

you for the remaining 

days You must call ut 

before noon the day 

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we'll put a headline 

above your ad to catch 

tlw reader's attentKm, 



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Open Market 




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frsivtH 1p1|>^ 



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ARTS I ENTERTAINMENT | SEX | FOOD | YOUR LIFE 

THE EDGE 



i 

i 



FHday. March 2. 2007 



KANSAS STATt COLLEQAN 



Paget4 



'Full House' dad hosts NBC game show mwietimes 




Director, actor, stand-up comic Bob Saget takes new role in *1 vs. 100' 



■yJvffrayltalit 

UNJMmTlCOilECIItN 

Comedian Bob Saget is back on 
letevishn, and this time he's taking 
on an untamiliaT roie in the past, 
He'i been a ttand-up comic, the star 
ot a dayttme IV seriei and rtctntiy, 
the director of a motne, "Farce of the 
Pingutni. 

Now. he's a g^me show host 
Sagft is host of NBC's "I t>s. tOO" 
a quit show that pits one contestant 
againtt too others for a chance to 
win $1 miltian Tlie questions come 
in multlpte<hi>ire format and get 
tncreaslngty harder as the gflme pro- 

"1 vs. too" might sound complex 
because of Its name, but as Saget 
points out, the shotv's brithance is 
actuatty in Its simplicity It doesn't 
take much time to understand the 
rules, though Sag/et admitted to 
strufflling with them at first 

The show debuted Oct tJ, 2006. 
and a new season begins tonight at 
?. Saget recently spent time promot- 
ing the show and sat down to dis- 
cuss his latest endeavor 

Q H»w did lh« iltuatktn of you 
hotUng "1 VI. too" come about? 

Ai (N BC) was very aUhusiastJt; about 
Ihf idea of me hosting the ihow be- 
cauae It was a quiz-show format, 
very aimplc. and they also wanted to 
rely on comedy They needed aome- 
body they felt could perform in front 
of 100 people like that and so ihcy 
really felt like they needed a stand- 



up comedy penon So it just seemed 
like I was the choice, and they asked 
me to do it, and I thought about it 
and said, Yeah, why not?' 

Q: How do you like this game show 
thing? b It a breeze for you? 
A: Pot me to finally learn the rules is 
a major accomplishment. "1 vs. 100" 
is pretty straightforward. 1 always say 
this game is so simple because, well, 
I'm simple. I don't know how any- 
thing is played. But it really is one 
person veraus 100 people, but every 
time I go to explain it 1 start crack- 
ing up because 1 block myself from 
knowing the rules. It's kind of like 
"Who Wants to be a Millionaire?" 
combined with that old show I used 
to love, "You Bet Your Life." 

Q: You've done so many different 
Ihlnp. from dlrly stand-up to hav- 
ing a daytime terfet and now back 
lo doing another network show. 
What i* it like making that kind of 
transition? 

A: It's just being able to play differ- 
ent levels of comedy. 1 enjoy doing 
stuff that reaches millions of people, 
family stuff. Because there's no way 
I could do ("1 vs 100") or the other 
shows I've done commercially and 
do them in the way I do my comedy. 
You limit yourself when you hit 
an audience that's foul I love enter- 
taining people that are just like my 
friends When I go do stand-up com- 
edy, it's like stuff for college people. 
It's not done to offend, and it's not 
done for shock value. I'm just sort of 



playing the cards as they come at me 
I'm not sure what will be next But 1 
think I just kind of go back and forth 
between the family stuff and the oth- 
er stufi that i also find very furmy. 

Q: Do you think you make thai 
tnmsttlon smoothly? 

A: Oh, I don't know. I'm too busy 
trying to get stufi done 1 don't re- 
ally get a chance to critique myself 
When I'm doing "1 vs 100," that has 
a certain edginess to it sometime. 
It's meant to employ my comedy 
style, and it's more family- oriented. 
But it's the same person that I do 
my comedy with. It's the same exact 
person. I'm not a different guy. It's 
just 1 know the rules of broadcast- 
ing. After 8 o'clock at night you don't 
talk foul 

Q What do you think distinguishes 
your show from "Deal or No Deal," 
the game show that airs prior to 

yours? 

A; Well, we don't have briefcases. 
But our show is clearly a trivia show 
It's a simpler show. It's just like the 
old game show sort of thing. But I 
love Howie (Mandel), and he's very 
clean, which I like, 

Q: Are you luipriaed by the number 
of contestants that don't answer the 
s«emingty rudimentary questions 
correctly on your show? 
A: That's interesting because a lot 
of people say to me, 'Arc people re- 
ally stupid?' And I don't think that's 
what it is I think a lot of things hap- 




pen. When you're on T ^^ you get ner- 
vous, and people just unn't on their 
game. 

Q: Though you are yc«rs removed 
from "Full House," many p«ople 
still identify you as )«ing Danny 
Tanner (his TV character). Are you 
OK with thai? 

A: I'm a walking disclaimer You 
know, there's nothing you can do 
about it. I've watchefi people that 
have been in this im^^i^ess for year&. 
and they're saying, "I'm not that guy" 
They're standing on a mountain (op 
screaming, "Who cares'" I have a lot 
to do, and I've got kills to raise. If 
people call me Danny, I just look at 
them and say, "You can call me Bob," 
or I'll say nothing, or I'll go, "Yes I'm 
Danny." 

"1 vs. 100" airs at 7 p./ct- t^idays on 
NBC 



Pendergast to offer new album at release show 



"Bttwttn tht Bottle and the 
Pulpit' 

Pm4ir|Mi CO (mkw by irit tnmn 

Tony Ladesich, lead singer and 
•ongwriter for the Kansas City- 
boMd band rendergsii, said (he 
process of creating an album took 
longer than he would have liked. 

But in the two years it took to 
create (he band's newest album, 
"Between the Bottle and the Pul- 
pit," the time and effort exerted by 
L<adeilch and hit bandmates was 
w«l) worth the wait 

Pendergast'i second record 
la 13 track! of alternative coun- 
try, roots rock and rockabilly that 
tcho of the open road, heartbreak, 



the working class and liquor 

"Between the Bottle and the 
Pulpit" possesses the free-wheel in' 
grit and grind of Son Volt, Neil 
Young and Gram Parsons, and the 
album is fueled by the excellence 
of Pendergast s musicianship and 
creativity, along with Ladesich's 
lyrics of personal memoirs and 
brutal honesty 

To promote the new album, 
Pendergast is playing a CD release 
show Saturday night at Auntie 
Mae's PaHor. 

The show will start at 10 p.m., 
and the cover charge will be $4, 
according to the Auntie Mae's 
Web site 

Ladesich said the band could 
not have chosen a better venue 
than Auntie Mae's to release ita 
album. 



"We absolutely love playing at 
Auntie Mae's," Ladesich said "The 
people of Manhattan that we've 
met, and especially the people that 
come to this bar (Auntie Mae's), 
are into good music. They respond 
well, and they're a great crowd to 
play for. 

"We like people that want to 
dig into our lyrics and the textures 
of our music and come away from 
our shows getting something out 
of it. That's why we like this place. 
The patrons of Auntie Mae's are 
music fans that are into finding a 
deeper meaning in what they're 
listening to" 

The purpose of the show at 
Auntie Mae's tomorrow night is 
to celebrate the release of Pender- 
gast's just second album, but the 
band is made up of veteran musi^ 



clans who played in other groups 
long before the start ol Pendergast 
in 2002 

"I've been in some good bands 
before, but none of thoje compare 
to the talent and mum lanship we 
have with Pendergast," Ladesich 
said. "Everyone in this band is ex- 
perienced and knows what they're 
doing. We're spoiled to haw one 
another." 

As far as the future | lans for 
Pendergast, Ladesich h,»d no con- 
crete answers, but he drd offer a 
few expectations. 

"I don't want it to take us an- 
other two years to put ,iut another 
album," Ladesich said "And I 
want to continue to do something 
that has a little . swagger to it 

"To be a good band, vou've al- 
ways got to have a littlt iwagger." 



I ■ dtnatK ttaitt playing SatMrday an! 
itmittf only. 

* NawMvtafMSMkOilMiClMMlUl 



*niMMiii,'K-U,1»Mia. :. 

(U:4S,J,«),5:25,7:«,I0 Zl 

A 9rMp ot vuburtun biktt «wsnnib« (John 
Trmtts, Tim Alkn, William H. Mary, Martin 
Uwrencel looking Kk ^dwniuit hiti th; open 
roid, but tfw men gtt mm than they b«t)ilnid 
for wliN) they encouittet t gang frtm Nm 
Mnxo. 




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<i ftn«l kilff In tht San ffincsco itf htt taunts 
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I ^WKtijaton and reporters become otsnsed 

wjthlfiecaseinthisligrvtIyfictionaliiedaccoiAl 
I »fa m/e197(h case aased on Robert Graysmlh^ 

lM)k, the movie fontses on the lives dnd careen 
'thedctKtives and newspaper employees wlio 

try tD solve the mystery and catch the murdew 

I m Jake GyUenhial and Roben Downey Jr.l 




* tlack Snake Moan,' R, 118 fliifl. 

(130), 4: IS,;, 9:40 

A Cod i>!artng blues musician (Saitiuel I. Jadi> 
Sfr ' I takes m a wild younq woman (ChrtitliM 
Sk.il) who. i' > vKtim ol childhood sexual ibmt, 
loo ' s everywhere for love but never quite frndi it 
Ah t (eai uring Justin TImberlake. 




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(lS;^,4:05,?iO,*S5 

This irtqael shows a youog Hannibal lectw 
(Gatiiard DIM) in three phases of his life — his 
child v>0(l in lithuania, his ten years in England, 
and ! t . time m Russia before his capture by fH 
agen MIIGiaham in 'Red Dragon." 




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I 

I 




KANSAS STATE '"side 



OLLEGIAN 



the f^ildoits, playing 
mfrmtofasell-out 
travdat Bramla^e, 
lieat Oklahoma 72-61 

SMSfiftl^ftt 




wwwJutatec uUegian com 



Monday, March 5. 2007 



Vol lIl.NdllS 



Clinton charges audience to be proactive 



Clinton offers listeners 5 questions 
to uncover solutions to world issues 



ty AdrikMM (HWmm 

MNSASStATHDLLE&IAN 

Concerned citizens need a frame- 
work tu evaluate questions facing 
today's world, said Bill Clinton, the 
42nd U.S. president, Friday after- 
nuon at Bramlage Coliseum during 
the 148th Landon Lecture 

Clinton said U.S. citizens should 
answer five questions in response 
to the changing world, regardless of 
tlieir political affiliations. 

"You may not agree with my anal- 
ysis, but you should be able to answer 
those questions," Clinton said to an 
audience of more than 9,000 people. 

Clinton asked the audience to con- 
sider the following five questions and 
offered his feedback in each area. 

WHAT IS THE FUNDAMENTAL 
NATURE OF THE 21 ST CENTURY 
WORLD, IN A W0RD7 

Clinton said though most people 
would say globalizati(m, he prefers 
the term "interdependence" Global 
ization. he said, is strictly an econom- 
ic term, and today's world transcends 
economics. 

There is more internal diversity 
in America and all other rich coun- 
tries than there used to be as people 
flock to centers of opportunity seek- 
ing a better tomorrow," he said. "1 just 
look through this crowd, and I bet it's 
more diverse by race, by religion and 
evert by gender than it would have 
been if we'd had a meeting here 40 
years ago." 

15 IT A GOOD OR BAD THING 
THAT WE ARE LIVING IN AN AGE 
OF GLOBAL INTERDEPENDENCE? 

It \i> both, Clinton said. Though 
the world is line for those who can 
afford food, clothing and shelter, it 
also does not work for about half the 
world's population, he said. 

Clinton said about 1 billion peo 
pie live on less than SI a day, and 
one in four people this year will die 
from one of four sources that almost 
no American will die from: AIDS, 
tuberculosis, malaria and infections 
related to unsanitary water 

HOW SHOULD WE TRY 
TO CHANGE THE WORLD} 

The transition from interdepen- 
dence to integrated communities on 
a local, national and global level will 
allow people to change the world, 
Chnion said All successful integrat- 
ed communities share opportunities 
to participate, responsibilities for the 



welfare of the whole and a sense of 
genuine belonging. 

However, instability and vulner 
ability exist in today's world through 
climate changes, unequal economic 
distribution, topsoil erosion and oil 
scarcity, he said. 

"1/ you look at the modem world, 
we have no choice but to try to move 
from interdependence to integration 
because the world we live in today is 
- we can't keep going this way," he 
said 

HOW DO YOU CHANGE 
THE WORLD? 

A security policy and diplomacy 
strategy are key in changing the 
world Ending world hunger and ed 
ucating children also are significant 
contributors to building relationships 
with other countries and fighting ter 
rorism. Clinton said 

"We've got to have a security strat 
egy, but if you live in an interdepen 
dent environment and you can't kill, 
jail or occupy all your enemies you've 
got tu have a strategy tu make more 
partners and fewer enemies, too." 
Clinton said "It is always, >dways 
cheaper than fighting." 

WHO IS SUPPOSED TO DO 
ALL OF THIS? 

Though the govemmeut has its re 
sponsibilities, it is every k.'itizen's re 
sponsibility to help change the world. 
Clinton said He referred to his AIDS 
projects in 25 cuuntnes a« an exam 
pie of changing the world 

"I try to say, '"m a citizen now,' 
Clinton said. "'What can a chizen 
do?' Let's answer that question, and 
then you identify everything that's 
left, and you say, 'What has tu be 
done at the state, local or national 
level, and what can be done by the 
business community?'" 

Clinton also said the line between 
international and domestic relations 
nearly disappeared in the last 40 
years. He briefly referenced former 
Kansas governor and 1916 presiden- 
tial candidate Alf Landon '& inaugural 
Landon Lecture in 1946. which was 
titled "New Challenges in Interna 
tional Relations" 

"I'm here in the heartland of the 
coimtry with a bimch of people who 
are far more connected to the world 
beyond America s borders than siu 
dents would huv: been 4 1 years ago 
on either coast," Clinton said. 

Clinton's lecture Friday completed 
the roster of all US presidents since 




Catrina RawMn I CD .[ Wn 
FofiT w Prcsldant Btll Clinton addrassw patroni during the i48th Landon Lcrl jre 
Frida / afternoon at Btamiage loliteum. Clinton is ttte sixth sitting or former prrfid*nt 
to mi ke an address at the sei «. 




I coil' JAN 



CUnt -t .p«aks to » packed Bn mlage Coliseum Friday afternoon 




Clinton rvcalva-i 

applduiefrom tl '• 
6ramiAg« Colif«>tim 
crowd. Clinton 
addressed a nur^tiWf 
of publk issues 
Mith five questio s 
hediKussed du>'ng 
tht lecture. 

Chrldophar 

HaiMwifidMl 

COlLfUMI 



Students 
receptive, 
motivated 
by lecture 



ByMitolMly 

KANSAS SIATt CiHL[«IAN 

After hearing his message of 
integration rather than globaliza 
tion, many studentf who attended 
former President BUI Cfrnton's 
Landon Lecture were impretted. 

"1 think he's a very talented 
speaker," said Ben Keck, sopho 
more in businns administration 
pre professional. "You can tell that 
he's experienced in the art." 

Though the ticket distribution 
lines did not stretch as far as those 
for ['resident George W Bush's 
lecture, many students said the 
response from the crowd was no 
different. 

The place seemed just as loud 
as it did for Bush, and it se«ms like 
there were more students here to 
see Clinton," said Nick Kenney, 
freshman in history 

One idea students took away 
from the speech was the ever-di- 
minishing line between domestic 
and international issues 

"I'm glad that he spoke about 
globalization, because it is going to 
be very prevalent for our genera 
tion," said Adam IngersoU, junior 
Id biology. 

Clinton providrd a five point 
framework for any political situa 
tion, noting that it takes an answer 
to all five questions to iorm an in- 
telligent stance on he issue Many 
students said they felt this frmme- 
work IS something they can put to 
use in their lives 

"It was a good idea to provide 
a model for the thought process," 
said Harrison Poole, sophomore 
In civil engineering "It was a little 
redundant, but 1 think it does a 
good job of covering the procew." 

One area with which many at- 
tendees disagreed was the amount 
of foreign aid the United States 
should provide to other countries. 
Clinton said in order to take care 
of America's next generation, the 
country needs to take care of the 
world. 

"Other nations breed tenor- 
ism from ail early age, so by the 
time Uwy are adults the hate 

Sn LECTURE RESPONSE )>««( 9 



Military science instructors, students honor fallen soldier with plaque, room dedication 



tor $«»nd LL lames 

RAkhad Gttins, i 2003 

K-Stalt graduate and 

former cadat iKondo 

commander of KState's 

Army ROTC program, 

hangs outside Itw recondo 

room dedicated to him 

during the ciedkalion 

ceremony Friday morntng 

HI My«rs HaN 



(jOLlHMt 




ft/H«rtMh«Hdi 

WnSASmtECOUiUAM 

K-Staie honored i older who was killed in Iraq with 
a room dedication Friday 

Second U |atrut Michael Goins wts killed in a 
Kunlight m Najaf, Iraq, on Augu.ii 15 2004. al the ugc 
"f r^ Members of th- Deportment ol Military Science 
•rvd Coins, a 2C03 K State graduate and former 
Litdct recondo comm inder of the K State Army KOtTC 
program, with a rot m dedKatkm ceremony in the 
basement of military iciencc building Myers Hall Rri 
day morning 

■'We always knew ve would do sumelhuig like this 



eventuall -," said Patrick )ohnson, assu-ant professor of 
military ^ience and Corns former BOTC instructor. 
'We fuH v-cded to give it some time tu work out" 

The ( idication began at 11:30 am with a few 
words frrm cadets and instructors 'vho had either 
known u heard stories about Coins. 

"Mief icl has always been my hero, even before 
he died," <«id Misty Richardson, 2(X)? K Sute gradu- 
ate and I use friend to Ctoins during their time in the 
KOrrc pi igram 'He was a committed family man and 
a wondei til friend" 

Goitv aridow. Paula, sat at the fron t of the recondo 

SeeMEM0fimiP»9(» 



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Today's forecast 

Mmtly sunny 
High:SB iamVi 



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lum <w J nj^ cointMt tlw WMMflllMB^ 
tnutuil fundf Mid tfftMcilM of ifepotit 

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aMPUS NEW! HIGHLIGHTS 



Professor to $p«ak 
on rural migration 

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IHrtf 1Mb IMwtnJty in (hic^ 
vii 9ta on tfir gvpMiq mgrsllDn 
jnd pan (CsnnK condilum of ttir 
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Uim ItitipMdtiiipgMavdby 

guishnl Ihbk ^mn tl Sooology 



Event to Ktflilight 
Sudanese a tturt 



Buddhtsf to present 
lecture on diversity 



HwUnwifta^m AMlwakigh- ThapowiHyitfllidhiiiThm, 

dKCW af Ac tfRMn BuddhHt 
Study C«M(r in Mac Mtuien, 
UM,, will gift > fitmMui. 
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KANSAS Smif COLUGIAN 



Monday. March 5, 2007 



CMI 



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WEIRD NEWS 



Bizarre, funny and unusual stories from around the world 



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FUNiTJONS WOULD PRORABIV Bfi A RWD 

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HtAMNE SIGNAl KNOCKS 
OUT GMIAGi DOOR OPItmS 

QUANTICt>, V» - For man>* 
mibwrt»nitt«, )llc mthttiit i^ngc- 
door opvnns is untinuginablc 

But neighbors of the Marine 
base thetv haw bci'n n^diKcd tu 
jiBt that alter a strving radtu sig- 
nal coming (rttm the facility be- 
gan iwutraliiing rcmole-vuntrul 
openere 

Last (all, residents around an 
Air Rim facility in Colorado 
Springs, Colo , taw their garage 
door remotes stop working when 
the 2Ut Space Wing began lest 
tng ■ frequency for use during 
hoHKland sccuri^ cmct>ifncics 
or threats TVu years ago. testing 
of ■ similar i^eni at Fbrt Dctrick 
in Maryland rwiultcd in similar 
proUems 

For decades, the military has 
held a portion of the radio spec- 
tnim, tirum 138 to 450 megahertz, 
in rwerw That part was bor 
rowed by remote-control manu- 
facturers, with the undent aj) ding 
that the signal be weak enough 
for the mllitaiy to override it. 

IDIOT' COMMf NT PRODS 
P0WER8ALL WINNER 

DES MOINES, Iowa - Ed 
O'Neill's bank account just got a 
lot bigger, thanks to a co-worker 
who told him some "idiot " hadn't 
claimed an $800,000 Powcrball 
lottery prize 

O'Neill, 58, who works for the 
Clinton Chamber of Commerce, 
bought the ticket for a [anuary 6 
l>owerball drawing. 

He told loWB Lottery stalT- 
en he didn't think to check the 
results until a couple days after- 
ward, when a chamber a-ception- 
ist pointed out an article in the 
local newspaper. 

"She said, 'Read this article 
about the idiot thai hasn't claimed 
his ticket' So I read it and noticed 
vAitn the ticket was bought," 
O'Neill said "I thought. Gee, I 



better look at n^ lickel.' That's 
when I saki, 'I think I won"' 

llwn he called his wife. Diane. 
58, who thought he was pulling a 
prank 

After taxea, the couple wiU gd 
about $560,000, much of whkh 
will go to pay off their mortgage, 
their children's mortgages and 
their retin;ment 

DATING WEB SITC TAKES WTS 
INTO ACCOUNT 

AMSTERDAM. Netherlands 
- A new dating Web site helps 
match people who are compatible 
baaed on their interest in dojp, 
cats or other pets. 

The Dutch site, called Dier- 
en -Mens, or Animal and Human, 
s»yi it is a meeting place for all 
animal k>vcrs, whether one is 
looking for a partner, someone 
who also likes snakes and spiders 
or someone who will take care of 
the chickens when they want to 
go away for the weekend. 

"How can you find a nice 
partner who is iust as crazy about 
animals as you are?" said Betty 
Mercey, who launched the dating 
site last weekend 

Members of the site can de- 
scribe themselves and their pets, 
and when they think they have 
found someone who also likes 
their pets, they can contact each 
other through the Web site. 

TIGER, ORANGUTAN BABIES 
FORM INSEPARABLE BOND 

CISARUA, Indonesia - A 
pair of month-old Sumatran tiger 
twins have become inseparable 
playmates with a set of young 
orangutans, an unthinkable match • 
in their natural jungle habitat in 
Indonesia's tropical rainforrats 

The friendship between 5- 
monthold female baby primates 
Nia and Imia and cubs Dema and 
Manis has blossomed at the Tti- 
man Safari eoo. where they share 
a room in the nursery. 



After being abandoned by theii 
modten strartly after birth, the 
four play-fight, nipping and teas- 
ing each otfter, and cuddle up for 
a shared nap when they ai% worn 
out 

"This is unusual and would 
never happen in the wild," said 
Bookeeper Sri Suwvni wfiile bot- 
tle-feeding a bal^ chimp Wednes- 
d^. "Like human babies, they 
only want to play" 

The exceptional friendship wUt 
likely be shod -lived, said vetcri 
narian Retno Sudarwati, because 
as the animals grow up, their nat- 
ural survival irutincts will kkk in. 

"When the time conies, they 
will have to be separated It's sad. 
but we cant change their namral 
behavior," she said 'TSgeis start 
eating meat when they «v three 
months old." 

'STUBBORN KANDINAVIAN' 
STICKS AROUND IN SEATTLE 

SEATTLE, ^Wuhmgton - Un- 
wanted when it was proposed in 
the early 1960s, a bronze statue of 
Leif Erikson on shores of Seattle's 
Shilsholc Bay seems to be exact- 
ing revenge 

Crews attempting to move the 
statue have been unable to budge 
the 17-foot-tall Viking firom his 
pedestal. 

"That's one stubborn Scandi- 
navian," remarked Kristine Lean- 
der of the Leif Erikson Interna- 
tional Foundation. 

On Tuesday, workers spent 
eight hours drilling at the base, 
pounding on the concrete and 
tugging with the crane 

The local Scandinavian com- 
munity paid $42,000 for the stat- 
ue 45 years ago, but the Seattle 
Parks Department didnt want 
it, according to a Seattle Times 
story, "on the gn>unds it might 
set a precedent for other ethnic 
groups." 



The planner | Campus bulletin board 



■ Cartar aad Emplaymcnt Stnrkti will sponsar i Dining 
Itiqufttf Worhhop at 5 JO p.m. March 1) in thr Gold Room 
of th( Dffby Dining Crnter. RM«rvatlont muit b* nisd« b)r 
Wf dnfidiy. To mskf t re itrvitlon. call (78$) $32-6$06 or vltit 
1O0 itolt; Hill. The (Oit \% $6.7S p(i person or mt»\ mhangt 
fof students with t meil plan. ProfettlonsI businfst ittire It 
requlrfd it thr dinner. 



■ fit* JapanMa Apprt<latl»it Autdattsn will matt it 7 

p.m. Wednesday in Union 203. 

Ilemi in the calendit cin be published up to three times. To 
place an Item In the Cimput Cilendir, stop by Kedzle 116 and 
All out a form or e-mill the news editor a (olltgion^ipMiu. 
nfu by 11 i.m. two diys before It Is to run. 



Ihetriotttr 

Arrests In Riley County 

lipoRsiietiltenAvdyftofniheMeyCouity 
Hke Dqurtmenl^diiy bgLihe Colegiin 
dues rwt fct wheel bdts or mlnar tiaffit vWi- 
DonibeauseoftpicecoiBlnbfc 

lliundqi, March 1 

•(MyliwiCrfkiM. ^111 ^lr<t«ankltoKl 
It 9:504in. fcrmladon ofi pratedtw onJet 
Bond was S),0(l& 

■ PMrid UtMMwi 4)4 Ouge k. Apt 
7, at 1 1 i) i.m. fv prabaiion vtotatiga Bend 
wasUSOO. 

■(M*nOaMiti tJMe 447 MariM Had at 

1 146 a.m. to theft and computer dime, tend 

was$l,SOO. 

■Qlriflaplw Edwanl Gam Gark 618 

tlma Si. at ) )0 Fim for extradition of hnpiis- 

enn^fitNobondiMssei. 

■ IM«a Mwry DafMwn, Junction at]ii 
at 4:SS p m for tnffidiing tnttrabind imo a 
CMTcctioiMl (acWty Bond was $1300. 

■ MilaM Am Hmm, 1 01 9 Garden Way, at 
6:30 pim for battery. Bond wat $SOa 
■NkbaltiMricJMbafi l0i9Giiin 
Way, at 7 pm for battery. Bond was SSOOl 
■iMska MariMla Arttnaaux. K1 7 KUtu 
SL, at 8 pm. for a mrthteu chedi. Bond w« 
S189.J2. 

■ Mm Diimii laan Ogden, Kan., at 1 1 -iO 
pm. fori wonhless (tiedi. Bond was !S00. 

Friday, March 2 

■ Tklon loth Hirtdwm, 830 Icavenmnh 
St., at 12 48 am Am f*lur? to appear, posses- 
sion ot drug paratttiemalta, unlawful posseslofl 
of a depieaint and drMng under the influ- 
ence. Bond was $2,0} S. 

■ RobaitCoiyHtniimlti 1910M(xitgonv 
wy Ww, at 1 45 a m. for diiving under tt» 
influence Bond was SI, 500 

■ Amy MetU Rois. 60 )|i Tuftte Terrace, 
loH7. at 1 5 1 a m Iw batlwy acjainst a law 
enforcement otfKer, battery against a cooec- 
tms officer arxl otmindl damage to pnpetty. 
Bond was $2,000. 

■ (had Wayn* Mcaffec, Bettfue, Kan, at 2 
amfordnvinguniiefthe influence Bond was 
$750. 

■CaH)rEita6aUit9t«n,18l9ToddRoa(t« .. 
2:M a,m. for drtwg und« ttte Influence. Bond 
w«sS750. 



Corrections and 
darifications 

There was an emx in Fnday's Collegian. The 
dasses listed In the article "K- State oAers 
dasses at Fort Riley' are not offend this 
semester. See today's story on Page 7 for lf» 
conect classes. The Collegian regrets the errw. 
If you see something Ittal should be corrected, 
call news editn Alex Peak at (785) $32-6S» or 
e-malla(li9iiarK^»^bAsu.du. 

Kansas State Cdlegian 

<U$P$ 291 020) The Kansas State Collegian, a 
student newspaper at Kansas State Unlvefslty, ; 
is published by StucJent Publidtions I nc , ; 

Ked/ie 10], Manhattan, KS66S06.TheCol- ■ 
lecpan is published weekdays during the school ^ 
yeirarHlQnWtdnediyidwinqthesummer. ~ 
PertodKal postage bjMklllt Manhattan, KS 
66S02 POSTMASTFR: Send address changes to 
Kansas State Coilegiaa circuiaiton dnJi, Kedzie 
m Manhattan, KS«6S06-7167. 
C Kansas State Collegian, m7 



Utt your leadership and listening slcillt! 

APPLY NOW for an Honor Council 
appointment for tKc 2007/2008 term. 

Infornutton and applications at the 
Honor It Integrity System infomution 

tabk in the KSU Student Union food 
coun arsa this Wednesday, March 7th. 




Mor« infornution at Honor w»b 

paft (wnivw.ksu,edu /honor). Click 

on "Honor Council" 



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Monday. March 5, 2007 



KANSAS STATt CCHLEGtAN 



Page 3 



Lively letters 




HIRE events inform 
about honor system 



ty f rk Irawn 

MMSASSIMECOUfOIAN 



K- 
In- 



Chri*t«f>ti«r H«n«i«rifMlM4 KO(lCGi«N 
Aaron Nkkvy, tophomor* in soctology and m*ml)«r of Phi Gamma (XKa, tpray paints the 'J" of FIJI whlt«. 
Hickey and othet memb«rs of the fraternity laid they decided to piint pdttetni foi the various seasons on the 
letters in response to people randoir^ly painting them 

Fraternity decorates sign to show spirit, attract attention 



By S«tena Strata 

KANSAS STATE (OlLtGIAN 

As the green and white paint 
dried, Aaron Hickey spread 
stimli, faux-gold coins al (he base 
or the Phi Gamma Delta statue 
letters. Hickey, sophomure in 
sociology, came up with the 
idea of painting the Fl[l letters 
with green shamrocks, 

"People who don't know us 
on campus can see our letters 
from the road, and we stand out 
from the different fraternities." 
he said "They can know we arc 
festive." 

Hickey said he usually asks 
the chapter members to confirm 



his decoration ideas and give 
input One idea - a leprechaun 
statue on the letter "I" - came 
from Forrest Smith, sophomore 
in landscape arvhitecture. 

"We wanted to add the 
leprechaun to get a laugh out of 
people," Smith said. "We added 
the coins so the Icprcchaun can 
sit in a pot of gold' 

Flfl members also decorate 
the letters for other holidays 
For Halloween, mcml^ers used 
spider webs and orange and 
black paiiU. For Christmas, tliey 
painted the letters red and white, 
with the letler "|" as a candy 
cane. Hickey said For Easter, he 
plans to use pastel colors and 



decorate with Easter eggs. A 
rabbit also might appear 

Fill's letters used to be made 
of stone, but after someone 
pulled the letters otf their base 
with a pick-up truck, Hickey 
said the fraternity was forced 
to make the letteis out of metal 
and secure the base with 50 
pounds of concrete 

"Other people used to come 
by and paint our letters with 
differunt colors," Hickey said 
"lb stop this, we started to 
paint the letters purple, but then 
decided if we were going to take 
the time to spray painl them, we 
might as well have fun." 

Smith said painting the 



letters is a creative way to fix a 
problem 

"Now I'm not too worried 
about others vandalizing our 
letters," he said. "Hopefully, they 
see our time and effort and don't 
do stuff to it When people drive 
by, the colorful PIU catches 
your eye. and people will talk 
about us even more" 

Marc Mason, junior in 
finance, said he helped paint 
the letters because of pride in 
his house 

'We are starting a new 
tradition, which attracts 
attention in a positive way," 
Mason said "Hopefully we will 
continue this" 



This week marks 
State's seventh-annual 
tegrity Week 

The week will begin with 
the keynote address. "Hon- 
or and Integrity." by K-State 
head football coach Ron 
Prince at 4 p m Tliesday in 
the K-State Student Union 
Little Theatre. The address 
is open to the public. 

On Wednesday, Honor 
and Integrity Peer Educa- 
tors will have an informa- 
tion table set up from U 
am to 1 p m in the Union 
food court. A mock honor- 
panel hearing from 11;30 
a.m to 12:30 p m Thursday 
in Union 213 will conclude 
the week's events. The hear 
ing is open to all faculty and 
students. 

The events taking place 
throughout the week, which 
include speeches, informa- 
tion tables and skits, will 
be sponsored by K-State's 
Honor and Integrity Peer 
Educators. 

HIPE is a registered K- 
State student organiiation 
that serves as the educa 
tional component of K- 
Statc's Honor and Integrity 



System, according to the 
HIPE Web site 

"Our week-long goat 
with these events is to edu 
cate students about the hon- 
or system at K State as well 
as publicize our group," said 
Molly Coleman, president 
of HIPE and sophomore 
in biology. "1 think there's 
a lot of students who are 
unaware of what the honor 
system consists of." 

Coleman said she will be 
a participant in Thursday's 
mock trial. 

"The point here is to 
demonstrate what would 
happen to a student if they 
were to be turned in to the 
honor system." Coleman 
said "The mock trial will 
have an honor council of 
faculty and students who 
will be in charge of the 
mock sanctions, just as a 
real trial would have" 

Coleman said HIPE add- 
ed events like the mock trial 
to this year's Integrity Week 
to broaden the event and 
reach more students 

"Last year we lust had 
information tables for In- 
tegrity Week," Coleman 
said "And 1 think what we 
have planned out for this 
year will be more effective." 



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OPINION 



Page 4 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, March 5, 2007 



UFT OP M KC I ^* c<Jitorlal board »lects Hit or Mits topks and wr4t«s them afttf a majority vote, 
ni I l/n fVII J J This a the Collegian's official opinion. 




HH I ainton lecture 



Often, prnininent iftiktn find i wiy to talk for an 
hour without uyinq miKh. Bill Clinton provided t mm 
ujbjtantive lecture than weVt corrw to expect fnmi politi- 
cians. Granted, he'i oirl of office, but It is nice to itt some- 
one powerful take a stance. We also appreciate (Union's 
wNlingness to take questions after the speech, even those 
about the looming possibility of Armageddon 




Miss I Wefalifs shameless plug 

Jon Wefald's shameless plug lor K- Stale seenwd a bit 
tacky CDnsidedng the cirtumstatKes, At least Clinton^ 
acknowledgment ot the free adyertisinq opportunity 
lightened the mood. Sure, K- State has lots ol Rhodes 
scholars, but this was a kcture inttoduction, itot a recruit- 
ing commercial. 




Hit I K-State men's basketball 

The Wildcat seniors used their last game at Bramlage 
Coliseum to secure the highest Big U tourrwment se«J in 
school history. It also put the Cats one step closet to their 
first NCAA Tournament. Among another sold-out hon» 
ganw, Cartier Martin's career high and K- State's fint win 
over Oklahoma since 1999, it was a great way to end Bob 
Huggins' first regular season as a Wildcat 




Miss I Copy center moving 

With the copy center m Hale Library moving to the 
K- State Student Union, It's hard to ignore the potential 
Inconvenience to students and faculty wfw frequent the 
center, We hope the additior of hk|hspee<j scanners and 
new, self-serve copiers will keep things ninning smoothly 
in Hale. 




Hit I Rising temperatures 

At press lime, the weather is qurte pleasant, but by the 
time you read this, it might be snowing Oespite Kansas' 
unpredictable weather patterns, the projected tempefa- 
tures fix the next week all land in the high SOs and low 
60s. With spring break appmaching, it's nke to be able to 
walk to dass without dressing like an Eskimo 




Miss 1 3,349 vote in SGA election 

A nwasly 16 percent of the student body rated in the 
student body primary elections last week. That leaves \7J% 
studenb who did nol take the time to k)g on and voice their 
opinions. In the general election this week, we hope to see the 
numberof votes inaease dramatically. The top two candidates 
in the primary weie separated by only 17 retes, so log on to 
tgaehcooiK. k-statt. edu Tuesday to voce. 

Illuitratlont by Oonntt Lm| COIlEGlAN 



In his footsteps 

Losing a role model leads to reflection on what is most important 




RYAN 
SPENCER 



This column is dedicated to 
Robert Spencer. Let me preface by 
saying 1 ain in no way looking for 
pity or sympathy 
from anyone, 
so please don't 
misunderstand. 

This past week, 
my grandfather 
died. It was the 
Rrst time someone 
really close to me 
had passed away, 
and 1 found myself 
in something I'm 
not used to - a new situation. I 
didn't quite know it, but when 
something like that happens, your 
whole life gets put on hold, if just 
for a brief period. 

I began to think about college 
life and how in my six years at K- 
Statc. death has not been a central 
issue discussed on campus. 

When you think about it 
though, death is something that 
we as college students deal with 
on a regular basis 

We are at the age when our 
grandparents are getting older 
and older and our parents are 
beginning to retire. I actually have 
been lucky up until now, as almost 
all of my friends have had at least 
a couple of their grandparents die. 

My grandfather's death made 
me take a look not only at his life 
but also my own It showed me 
that although we can learn from 
our elders while they're here with 
us, we often don't fully understand 
all they have to teach us until 
they're gone 

My grandfather graduated from 
K-State in 1952 with a degree 
in mechanical engineering, back 
when the department was still in 
Seaton Hall 

He then went to work for the 
same company until retirement, a 
concept the job-skipping Ritalin 



addicts of today couldn't possibly 
imagine. 

He started a family with a 
wife he met while in college 
and had two children and two 
grandchildren who, together, make 
a wonderful three-generation 
Spencer household. 

1 look back on his life, and I 
see a man who was a hard worker, 
someone who believed strongly in 
getting an education, a man who 
put his family before all others 
and a deeply religious man who 
lived each day the best he could. 

If you were to read that list 
without knowing who 1 was 
talking about, does it sound 
like anyone our age you know? 
Unfortunately, probably not 

I'm not going to lecture on the 
poor work ethic of our generation 
or the decline of the traditional 
family, but 1 will point out how 
wonderful that list of traits sounds 
when you read it 

The life he led should be an 
example for all of us to follow 
when dealing with our day-to-day 
decisions 

I encourage everyone to start 
living some of those principles. 
Work hard during your time 
at K-State - your education is 
worth it. Loyalty in and out of the 
workforce counts for more than 
you could imagine 

Look closely at a family, not 
only for your future, but (or the 
one you have now. 

Finally, if you are a spiritual 
person, don't lose that in your 
life Hold on to your faith and 
practice it every chance you get 

My grandfather's death showed 
me how I face death. 1 face it by 
looking at what can be learned 
from it and finding out how 1 
can better my life and the lives of 
others. 

As "Star Trek" taught us. 



how we face death is at least as 
important as how we face life. 1 
can only hope my grandfather's 
death taught me how to improve 
my life so I can better face my 
own death when it comes. 

Until then. Grandpa, your 
goober will continue to make you 
proud. 



Ryan Spencer Is a senttrlntitttl 
rtitaurant management. Please 
commeRts to 0fisiMmpttb.laiLt4ii, 



tiu. / ffW 




llhitlralion by Etvli AdMlpoM | caLLECiMi 



P /'^l » N S A S S T A T ( 

f' Collegian 



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l|tSSI«DIUHtUI 



WRITE TO US 

Letters cart be submitted by e-mail to /effers^spoi. 
Ibu.etft/, or in person to Keiizie 1 16. Please Indude 
your hdl name, year In sctwol and mafor Letten 
should be limited to 250 wofds. All submitted letters 
may be edited for length and cladty. 



CONTAauS 

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KtM* Ift] Maniiattan, KSMSU 

Display adL (78»S}2^S60 

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OPtNiON EXCERPTS | Columns from newspapers around the world 



PUBLIC ASSISTANCE GROWS 

IHE KANGOR DAIir N{WS 

A review of new Census data 
by the Auociated Press this week 
shows dependency on public as- 
sistance continues to grow despite 
rules to reduce welfare rolls 

The analysis shows a shift in the 
types of public assistance Ameri- 
cans receive Instead of straight 
payments to the unemployed 
- known since 1996 as Temporary 
Assistance for Needy Families - 
the poor are more likely to receive 
benefits such as food stamps and 
medical support through Medicaid. 
As many as one in six Americans 
now receives some form of public 
assistance, the AP reports 

Shifting from general to specific 
services might be helpful in remov- 
ing disincentives to work State 
studies have shown cordis tently 
the number of people receiving 
TANF payments has stayed down 
thb decade Further, the fact that 
other services are available suggests 
that ■ feared "nice to the bottom" 
amoi^ states hasnt occurred 
as some advocates of the poor 
vmmed. 



ENOUGH GLADIATOR GAMES: 
THE MIDDLE EAST MUST TALK 

mLDAHYSIARjlEBAHONI 

Suddenly, the diplomatic season 
seems to have broken out all over 
the Middle East Tbe main players 
perhaps have seen the Icwming ca- 
tastrophe hovering over the region 
and decided to pull back from the 
brink 

This movement reflects a grow 
ing realization that cverybocly will 
lose if thinp continue on their 
present trajectory m the Middle 
East. The danger signs are em- 
bodied in two cuntinuuig violent 
trends that plague the region. The 
first is the steady expansion and 
popularity of militias, resistance or- 
ganizations, other powerful anned 
political grou|» and terrorists, 
groups beyond the control of gov- 
ernments The second is the steady 
build-up of American led armed 
forces in the re^on, combined with 
diplomatic pressure aimed against 
Iran. Syria. Hezbollah, Hamas and 
others who oppose the American-, 
British- and Israeli -led alignment, 
which includes several Arab gov- 
ernments 



THERE'S A PORN CRISIS 
IN CLASSROOMS? 

IHE WICHITA EAGLE 

I'm alsvays impressed by the 
ability of our state lawmakers to 
soWe problems most of us didn't 
even su^>ect existed 

Case in point: the pornography 
crisis in Kansas classrooms 1 had 
no idea this was going on 

Has show-and-tell taken on a 
racier edge since 1 svas a wide-eyed 
schoolboy? Are librarians stock- 
ing the "Collected Works of Hugh 
Hefner"' 

Not that I'm aware of 

Yet here comes Rep. Lance 
Kinzer, R-Olathe, with a bill that 
would make it easier to prosecute 
public schcml teachers for using 
obscene materials in classrooms. 

Kinzer said under current law, 
"materials that would be iUegal if 
sold at a pom shop may be legal if 
displayed to a kindergarten class" 

The bill was approved almost 
unanimously by the House 

I'd be leading the charge for this 
bill if there was evidence of a smut 
outbreak in our schools. I'm just 
not aware of any. 



Blogging 
keeps news 
accountable 



Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr., pub- 
lisher of The New York Times, said in 
an interview with Israeli newspaper 
Haaretz that the im- 
mediate future of the 
paper is still unclear, 

"I really don't 
know whether 
we'll be printing 
The Times in five 
years, and you know 
what?" he asked. "1 
don't care either" 

Ibday's newspa- 



LLJ 

GREG 
BROWN 



pers are facing new competitors on 
all fronts. The news-gathering side is 
under attack with Internet and cable 
sources popping up alt over the place 

Cable TV is driven by demands of 
both informing viewers just tuning in 
and retaining those who have been 
watching for a few hours already. 

But quality reporting has impli- 
cations beyond how we chcxjse to 
consume our news. Russia provides 
an example of what can happen when 
reporting falls by the wayside, and the 
picture doesn't look pretty. 

Russian president Vladimk Putin 
has the highest approval rating of any 
leader in the developed worid. He 
consolidated political power, used it to 
build up loyal allies and then consoli- 
dated economic power under those 
allies. But the key to his success has 
been a degradation in Russia's press 
that reached critical mass in 1996. 

Then- Russian president Boris Yelt- 
sin's populanty was in the single dipts 
with only months left before electrans 
Yeltsin pressured the media into prais- 
ing his administration, allowing him 
to capture the majority quickly while 
other leaders looked away. 

Wth that amazing swing, the press 
was defined as a tool to be used by 
politicians 

Weil -functioning news media serve 
as a fourth branch of government, a 
check and balance against power dis- 
orden in the political and economic 
spheres that threaten our pluralist sta- 
bility Luckily, it looks like other fonns 
of media are picking up the slack. 

The increased fcKus on transparen 
cy has combined with the online revcj; 
lution to make most data available oit 
the Internet. This is where blogs and 
other sources come in TTiough they 
mij^t not have the high-level access 
to one-on-one interviews, they have 
thousands - if not millions - of eyes 
looking at docutnents and statements, 

Blog writers broke stories ranging 
from Dan Rathcr's accidental use of 
forged documents to former Congress: 
man Mark Foley's online relationship! 
with former pages. Blogs are even a - 
growing source of news in Russia, try^ 
ing to fill the gap left by governmental 
control over broadcast media. 

Even if all that fails. Sulzberger 
has plans for The New York Tunes t(L 
Stirvive the transition to a distal agi.^ 
foi a year or two, a special team htsZ 
been working inside his company to ~ 
investigate how best to deliver the - 
news in everything from laptops to - 
cell phones — 

Here's to hoping he succeeds. - 



tint Brawn Istluntor In phikMiptiy,nMMtMd Z 

JffUfCQfFHnVfltltDd 



f, 



Monday, March 5, 2007 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Pages 



WORLD NEWS 




MALE NUDISTS WORK OUT 
WITH PRESS AT DUTCH GYM 

HETEREN, Netherlands - 
A dozen middle age and elderly 
men were game enough for a 
Dutch gym's invitation to work 
{fpt nude. But they were vastly 
mitnumbered by the dozens of 
ioumalists watching them lift, 
row and cycle in the buff. 

Fitworid owner Patrick de 
Man allowed the media in for 
the first session of "Naked Sun- 
day" after receiving inquiries 
frtim as far away as Russia and 
Australia. 

A few local politicians and 
^nudist tourism company also 
\ntched. Hiere was no group 
aerobics or naked instructors 



AFGHANS SAY U.S. FORCES 
OPENED FIRE ON CIVILIANS 

BARIKAW, Afghanistan 
- An explosives-rigged mini- 
van crashed into a convoy of 
Marines that US officials said 
also came under lire from mili- 
tant guiunen Sunday. As many 
as 10 people were killed and 54 
wounded as the convoy made a 
frenzied escape, and injured Af- 
ghans said the Americans fired 
on civilian cars and pedestrians 
as they sped away 

US officials said militant 
gunfire may have killed or in- 
jured civilians, but Afghanistan's 
Interior Ministry and wounded 
Afghans said m<»t of the bullets 
were American. 



CHINA'S MILITARY 
SPENDING TO GROW 

BElflNG- China will 
boost military spending by 17.8 
percent this year, a spokesman 
tor the national legislature said 
Sunday, continuing more than 
a decade of double-digit annual 
increases that have raised con- 
cerns among the United States 
and China's neighbora 

John Negroponte, US. dep- 
uty secretary of state, urged 
China to be more open . 

'We think it's important in 
our dialogue that we under- 
stand what China's plans and 
intentions are," he said. 

— llMbMdMHPMB 



Corn production, prices to rise 



By Megan Molhor 

KANSAS MAT! COlLEdlAH 

Farmers in Kansas and 
throughout the Midwest could 
enjoy higher com prices this 
growing season. 

Sue Schulte, communica- 
tions director for the Kansas 
Com Growers Association, 
said this increase is due to 
higher ethanol production in 
the Midwest 

"This will signal to growers 
to plant more com to get the 
higher price," Schulte said. 'It 
will help to meet the demand 
for com in ethanol produc- 
tioi^" 

Schulte said this means 
quite a bit to area farmers, as 
it will provide a stable market 
for com and p-ain sorghum 

'Both crops are used to 
make ethanol and are impor- 
tant to growers," she s^id. "It's 
great because something in 
our own backyard is creating 
such a demand for grain." 

This increase in price 
should not affect consumers 
much, if at ail, Schulte said, 
since grain prices are not di- 
rectly tied to consumer pric- 



"We're not talking about 
the kind of com that is used 
in products like canned com," 
she said "An example would 
be a box of Com Flakes. 
You ground up com to make 
them, and a normal box sells 
for around $3 There is only 
about 4 cents worth of com in 
a box, so it would take quite 
a price increase to have any 
impact" 

This kind of com is grown 
nationwide, although Schulte 
said the main areas are in the 
Midwest. 

"Kansas is on the western 
edge of the com belt," she said 
"It includes states like Illinois, 
Iowa and Nebraska, and the 
com production increase will 
have a very good impact on 
these states, since they are 
also the states where ethanol 
plants will be located." 

Mike Woolverton, K-State 
grain market economist, said 
he agreed the increased de- 
mand for ethanol has raised 
com prices and production, 
but said other factors might 
have affected them as well. 

"Com prices have doubled 
in the past seven or eight 
months," Woolverton said 



"They have doubled not only 
because of increased demand 
for ethanol, but also because 
we had a short crop last year, 
so supply is low around the 
world." 

The short crop was caused 
in part by a drought Woolver- 
ton said all crops could be af- 
fected by this event. 

"As we move acreage into 
com from other crops, such as 
wheat, there will be less land 
for these other commodities, 
so prices could be raised for 
everything," he said "Farmers 
will do belter this year, as long 
as prices remain strong." 

Woolverton said he does 
not foresee increases that 
should cause alarm for con- 
sumers, and many students 
said they agree. 

"J wouldn't worry about 
prices going up on food that 1 
buy, because com is only part 
of what is in food, and it isn't 
in all foods.' said Nathaniel 
Grote, senior in social sci- 
ence. "1 don't think it would 
affect meat or dairy." 

Grote said he would still 
buy these foods even if prices 
did go up. because "inflation 
is inflation" 



Investing options fit students' financial needs, fielp ensure future security 



ByBratttUng 

; MNSASSTAIKOLliQIIUI 

In eariy February, the US 
Pepartment of Commerce re 
^rted the national personal 
savings rate was at negative 1 
percent. For the first time since 
the Great Depression, average 
American citizens are living 
above their means. 

College student, however, 
have the potential to create 
large nest eggs for their futures 

Cardinal Mon^ Manage- 
ment is a program powered 
by Stanford University to help 
students leam about the ben- 
efits of saving early. According 
to its Web site, urww.stanford. 
sduZ-mikefan, if students save 
$1,000 each year from ages 20 
to 30, they will acquire more 
wealth through compounding 
interest than someone saving 
the same amount each year 



from ages 30 to 65. 

Rodney Vogt. instructor of 
accounting, said it takes a long 
time to build assets. 

"The hardest thing is differ 
ing gratificatton when it comes 
to purchasing luxuries, not buy- 
ing the latest and greatest gad- 
get as soon as it comes out," 
Vogt said 

A savings account is one 
way students can start saving 
for the hiture. Funds are easily 
accessible, and the account is 
insured by the Federal Desposit 
Insurance Corporation for up to 
$100,000. 

FDIC insurance guarantees 
money in savings and other ac- 
coimts will be accessible in the 
event of a bank failure 

Savings accounts are not the 
only opportunity for students to 
plan for the future. Certificates 
of Deposit provide a higher 
yield interest rate and FDIC 



insurance, but funds are locked 
into a time commitment and 
subject to an early withdrawal 
fee. Banlcs in and around Man- 
hattan offer CDs at different 
rates, time commitments and 
initial investment levels. 

Carrie Rowe, branch man- 
ager for Commerce Bank in the 
K-State Student Union, said the 
minimum for a CD on a one- to 
five-year term is $1,000 Shorter 
time commitments require a 
higher minimum amount 

CHiring a promotional offer, 
Commerce Bank is offering a 
$1,000 CD with a 525perccirt 
return for a 10-month commit- 
ment, she said. 

Stocks are another way stu- 
dents can acquire additional 
funds, but they also can carry 
a risk to the initial contribu- 
tion. In the ^e of technology, 
students can buy and sell stocks 
online without a broker 



Vogt said students should be 
careful when dealing with the 
stock market. 

""Cut losses when the price 
goes below 8 percent," said 
Vogt, "That way you only lose 
eight percent. This is a key to 
avoiding a huge loss. 

"People will buy more of a 
stock because the price is lower. 
This is what is called averaging 
down. It is a lot like catching a 
falling knife. Even though it is 
still going down, you still don't 
want to try and catch it. [f it is 
going down, there must be a 
reason." 



Investment vocabulary 



■ Slodi; A srajTTty thjt repcnenb 
pstitinmnNpofiaxporatlan Stodu 
JR iCKfivd to is cqiitiM. 

■ MutiulfuMl: An InwstTTKUt com- 
(unytiut pools mooey litini Inveton U 
buy stodu, bocxk or oihw investmMB. 

■ Ctrtflkalt Of dcpMit (CD}; A baiA 

iMiigi account wttti a set time the lunds 
wttictrain with dw lunli, fiom 14 (Uys 
tosfWniftiR. 

■ Munkipal tNMids: Bonds issued by 
stdtev, dt)es, countiM md towns l» M 
public taprtil pn>|«cts Ike nudt, sdwob, 
switdian ficitie, bridges Mid opcnt- 



Ing budgets. Ihese bonds m egmnpt 

(ram fedefil tatatjon ^nd from dale uti 
loul Uxes ItM the mvesun who reside In 
the state where Ihe bond Is issued. 

■ MsoftionarT acnNHil: An Kcount 

In which the investor gives j bitita, tank 
Of another person auttMfily to make 
ImMment dedsiom on the investor^ 
behalf. 

■ NOW Acowit A negotiable Older of 
withdrawal h is also comnwnly caHed 
InteiHt chedung because th« accounts 
payiKerest 




Pige6 



SPORTS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Going out with style 



Martin scores career high, leads 
Wildcats to win on senior day 



ly Jonathan Oarttn 

KAH&AS STATE COIUGIAN 



Senior Ctrtler Msrtin laved hli 
belt gtme for last, 

Martin, playing hit la*t ftimc at 
Bramlagc Callieum In front of a i«ll- 
out crowd, Korod a caroor-hlgh 30 
polmi and led K-Sttte (21-10, 10-6 
Big 12 Cunfertncc) to a 72-61 win 
over Oklahoma {15-14, 6-10) on le- 
nlor day Saturday. 

"I couldn't aik for anything bet- 
ter," Martin laid. "I went out with a 
career high and a win." 

After coming off the bench for the 
Wildcats for the pait two months, 
Martin started for senior day Hug- 
gini said the decision to start Martin 
was just for senior day. 

Martin had an extra fan in atten- 
dance for his last night as a Wildcat. 
His mother, Denisa Martin- Ball, saw 
him play at Bramlage for just the sec- 
ond time in his collegiale career. The 
fint game she attended was last year 
against Kansas 

Huggins suspended Martin last 
May for violating team rules He was 
reinstated Nov. 13 in time for the 
start of the season, but his suspen- 
sion forced him to miss offseason 
workouts with the team. 
I "He struggled early because he 
wasn't in great shape, and I'm sure 
b lot of that had to do with his sus- 
t)ension." Huggins said "He was like 
everybody else - he was thinking too 
much It's hard to play this game and 
think You have to react" 

Huggins said he was impressed 
particularly with how much his leam 
has improved on defense. K-State 



forced 11 tumoven and grabbed ilx 
■tetli in the tint period. 

The itlngy defense helped the 
Wildcats go to 20<4 run to close out 
the last seven minutes of the tint 
hill. During that span, the Soonen 
turned the ball over Ave timet, and 
K-Stste scored teverat bukeu In 
transition. 

"We stepped up and played better 
defentc in that first half," laid junior 
Divid Hosklnt. "That carried ut. 
When other teamt aren't scoring, It't 
a little easier to run out playt and get 
the momentum on your tide." 

Oklahoma lenior Nate Carter and 
junior David Codbold both scored 
10 points in the second half to help 
cut into the Wildcats' lead. However, 
it wasn't enough to offset Martin's 19 
points in the second period. 

Martin's 30 points led the way for 
the WildcaU. Hoikins had 14 poinU 
and senior Lance Harris added 10. 

Carter and freshman Tony Crock- 
er both had 14 to lead Oklahoma 
Godbold scored 12. 

The win broke an eight-game los- 
ing streak to the Sooners. The last 
time K-State beat Oklahoma was in 
1999. when the WildcaU won 66-31 
at Bramlage. 

Saturday's win also guaranteed 
the Wildcats the No. 4 seed in the 
Big 12 tournament, their highest po- 
sition in the tournament in Big 12 
history. They will play the winner of 
T^xas Tech and Colorado at 2 p.m 
Friday. 

"We're feeling kind of confident 
right now," Hoskins said. "We know 
we got a chance to play Tech so we're 
looking forward to that." 




Catrlna ftawton | COLUGIAN 
K-State's Cartlar Martin goes up for a shot Saturday whiie playmg Oklahoma at 
Bramlage Coliseum. Martin scored a career-high 30 points to help the Wildcats beat 
the Sooners 72-61. 



Wildcats, Martin, go out with a bang, set sights on NCAA tournament 




AUSTIN 
MEIK 



There was an air of finality inside 
3ramlage Coliseum 

Senior Serge Afeli paraded around 
the court, the flag 
of his native Ivory 
Coast draped acroK 
his shoulders. 

Cartter Martin 
took a curtain call as 
a throng of students 
attempted to chant 
his name (Hey, you 
try to get four syl- 
Jables out of "Cartier ~ 

Martin") As the Wildcats celebrated 
a 72-61 victory over Oklahoma, there 
was a sense of conclusion 
; "We definitely went out with a 
bang on this one," Martin said 

Of course, the biggest bang 
belonged to Martin, who scored a 
career-hi^ 30 points on senior day. 
ICoach Bob Huggins said it was the 
best game he'd ever seen Martin play 

If you know anything at all about 
Cartier Martin, you can't help but be 
hqipy for him. Everyone torn the 
Mketball managers to guyt who 
mop the tloott will tell you Martin It 
a genuinely nice guy. He looks you in 
the eye when he talks, and he's quick 
to fluh a imilc. He punctuates evoi^ 
phnte with ihc word "man." That's 
Cartier. 

Thli hun't been an euy season fur 
Martin. He was tutpcndcd fur must 
of the lummer, lumethlng he ipeakt 




Chrittoptwr Haiwwinck*! j COLl[(il*N 

K-Sta«a senior Carllvr Martin hlf h-flv« fans after a 30-point performance in the 

final regular season horrte gam« of his career, 



about sparingly now. He admits he 
might have been mixed up in the 
wrong thingi with the wrong people. 
He says he has everything itrtight- 
ened out. and it's easy to believe him. 

Ottce Martin wu reinstated, fuu 
•)q>«cted him to step in and lead 
K-SUte to the NCAA Tbumiment 
That's what happens when you'n a 
•enior and you play for Bob Hugglnt. 

Ail the while, Martin wu letmtng 
i new ityle of play. For the flttt three 
yean of hit ctmr, he wti a great 
ipot-up ihooter. Still, he wainl the 



complete player many people, Hug- 
gins included, thought he could be. 

The transition wasn't easy at first. 
Martin's numbers dipped, and he 
endured a constant stream of "What's 
wTtsng with Cartier?" questioni. 

Midway through the season, 
however, something H-emcd lo click 
for Martin. He reached double flguret 
In the last 1 5 gamci of the regular 
icason. Including seven 20-pulnt 
porfurmancvi. It ell culminated with 
Saturday's 30-puint, slx-rehound gem. 

Martin drainud five 3 pointers, In- 



cluding one that seemed to touch the 
ceiling before plunging tfirough the 
net. He created his own shots and at- 
tacked the basket. He recorded three 
steals and always seemed to have a 
hand in Oklahoma's passing lane, 

"I would say this is probably one 
of the best games I've had here at K- 
State," Martin said. 

C'mon, Cartier, is tliat the best you 
can do? 

"Well, I'd say the best game." 

That's better. See, we like it when 
the good guy rides off into the sunset. 
It appeals to our sense of poetic 
justice. Maybe the bracket ologists and 
the pundits and the computer geeks 
say K-State isn't a tournament team. 

Still, from where I was sitting, it 
sure didn't feel like K-Statc would be 
coming back to Bramlage for the Na- 
tional Invitation Tournament It didn't 
feel that way to Cartier. either. 

"What you mean? " he said when 
asked if he thought he'd played hit last 
game at Bramlage. 

After being reminded K-State could 
host an NIT game, Martin just shook 
hit head. 

"Oh, man, we're not shooting for 
the NIT, man," he inld. "I'm certain 
I'm not going to be able lo play here 
•gain" 



Auttm MMk h t wfMr In pdnt JwtiMlllfli, fltut 
HtHt twnnMfiti la tpeminpMati, 



Baseball team finishes 2-1 in Texas, plays against Brigham Young today 



I 



KAMMiTATHDllttlAN 



The K-State bateball team'i six- 
gime winning itreek came to a halt 
Sunday when It lost to California -San- 
ta Barbara H-6 The Wildcats finished 
2-1 In the LAinaf Claulc tftar notch- 
ing wlni on Pridiy and Seturday. 

The Wlldcitl Itartld with a tO- 
3 drubbing of St. John't Friday and 
played back-to-back extra-Inning 
garnet againtt Lamar and USCB on 
Saturday and Sunday 

In Saturday's 8-7 win agalnit La- 
nur, the Wlldcstt jumped out to a 7- 
1 lead but let the Cardinals back into 
the game by surrendering four runs in 
the bottom of the tixth Irming. Runs 
in the seventh and eighth completed 



It-StitfvtIrighamliiM 

WllMi)p.ni.iDdty 

WNret TelrmiA F«iilly SimMi * ' 

the comeback and lont the game Into 
extra framei. 

In the top hall of tlie tenth, lopho- 
more Byron Wiley lad thlngi oH with i 
single to right. Sophomore Tyler Link 
followed with hli third base-hit of the 
game off a bunt, advinctng Wtlqr to 
second A lacriftce bunt tarn fresh- 
man fuitin Bloxom advanced the run- 
ners further, and an intentional walk 
of senior Eli Rumler loaded the batet. 
Junior Brett Scott came through in the 
clutch for the WldcaU and delivered 
a sacrifice fly that allowed hit team to 
reclaim the lead. 

In the bottom half of the inning, 



junior Daniel F.dwBrds struck out two 
batters and retired a third with a full 
count and runnen on fint and toe- 
ond. Kdwardi worked nearly three 
Kurelctt Innings, striking out ilx, and 
recorded the win. 

Wiley and Link each had big garnet 
■t the plate (or the WildcaU, Wiley wu 
3-for-4 with two RBI end Link wu 4- 
for-3 with one KBl und a run scored. 

Sunday, It was K-State't turn to 
come from behind ugalntt UCSB. The 
Gauchos took a 6-2 lead in the top of 
the sixth and looked to have victory 
In hand until the Wildcats broke out 
for a four-run rally in the bottom of 
the eighth A scoreless ninth tent the 
game into extra innings. 

Neither team scored in the tenth 
inning, but in the top of the eleventh, 



UCSB'i Robbie Blauur tmaihvd u 
two-run home run over the right Held 
Will to give hit team the lead, 

Rumler singled to itart off the bot- 
tom half of the Inning but ended K- 
State's hope for a second comeback 
when he wu caught trying lo iteal 
Mcond. Santa Barbara held on to col- 
lect an 8-6 win and ended the Wild- 
cat'i ilx-game winning lueak. 

Rumler went 3-for-4 on the day 
and wu the only K-State player to re- 
cord muhlpje hlu. Sophomore TVevur 
Hurley took the lott for the WildcaU. 

This week the WildcaU return to 
Manhattan for the Rrtl home teriet 
of the season, a two-game set with 
Brigham Young. The first game it to- 
day at 3 p.m. at Iblnton Family Sta- 
dium. 



Monday, March S, 2007 

1-MINUTE 
DRILL 

Stiff reports 

RUN|Htllirwlnsitlowi 
itttuft LaA Chinn QutlMir 

Only thm K-Sbtiindi md IWd MhlUB 
(iHTipcttd SitiMliv In Airwi, km, K thi kM 
Stit( lift OwKi QuiiMlir. AH of them finlihid 
intttttofifKeaftMivinti. 

Junior Ijd Hill« wn the Mtohl ttmw with 
imar1iofti-10V4.HtriaiHnDMvm6S- 
1/2MthfK-Stitilmttitk)nilJin.S. 

Thii thnw wu thi M but In the mdon 
indmidf hcrtHglMfcr At WUIndetr 
Chimpkmshlp!, M« li prevtikmlV quilllM 
for l\H thkthtnigtn dwripkinthipi on Frtdiy 
tnd Sttuidi/, 

IWo women nn At mit for thtWWcMt, 
Sofitemon Ullinl Mtndn plMd tM wMi I 
trm of 4:54.09, tnd Aishmin Btmty ftmos 
pltod (Wth wWil tin* of 4i9 J2. The winning 
time Itirtht mtit wv 4:41.18 by Imwl 
MtghmAmBtrong. 

Junior M«9in Bondi tw nppONd tiiun In 
the wonmft W^mrttr mot bik dM not pKttd- 
pitt. Sht became «ll9fel( fly tf* NCAA mm 
with a tlrrw of 2:06.20 at the lowi Stm Omk 
earlier thH year. 

Othen who are eligible fof the upcoming 
NOW meet are sophorrrot? bren Grovw In the 
w^ throw, junior Mar^ruH Schltdito In the 
triple lump and wnior Bryn Bergmin ki the 
rrmi pole vault 

Two Wildcats autsmabally qi4il MM fur the 
MCAA dumpkHtshlp meet and both art high 
jumpeji Senioi Kaylene Wiqner (HHikd with 
a 6- 1 1 /4 jump, whidi raniu sewrith In the 
nation. SophomoK Scott SeMen b (wked ifiini 
In the nation on the men^ ilde wtti t jump of 
7-5 J/4. 



TEN I Tennis team falls to 
Missouri in Big 12 ofMiwr 

This ^wkertd the KState tfnne team had to 
^ake up Its linkup «Ke a9ain. Junior Fenunda 
Da Valle was sidelined witti a ned( injury, and 
junior lamar Kvantikheha stepped badi into 
the Na 2 singles ipot 

K-Staic, competing wtti IB makeshift kieuFi 
k)st S-2 to Misjoufi Saturday. 

Sophomore Maria FhvwshdiiluNi left the 
prognm prior to the WUdcab' match with Boise 
State Feb 24, Mng K-State to imeft junior 
Tetua AndaikMilnto ^ lineup. 

Kvarjtslihelia, who did not piay last weekend 
against Boise State or NewMeKico and only 
completed doubles nvatdies in the weekend 
before, came badt m both No. 2 singles and 
doubles. 

At press time, no further tnfwrriation about 
Da Vslle's injury was available, said co«ch Stew 
Bietdu. 

"Phjrslcalfy, Kvaratskh«lia was about to go 
on the coua but that was aboct it'he saki. 
"Fernanda had J »d( prablem that cam* up 
this week, and she was not physkally able to 
play." 

With the «tO(y ovw K-State, Miswuri (S-3, 
1-2 Big 12 Conferencel dakneditsfkst Big 12 
wki. The blight spot on Saturday for K-Stite 
(2-5, D-1 Big 12) wassophorrvore Kjtoim 
Kudlackova, who paied with jianta OI91 
Kiimova to win the No I doubles rrvatch agaktst 
Raquel Wagner and Katelyn MdCenae (g-4). 
Kudlactova also was viaoiious at the Na J 
sm^ spot defeating Mesoun^OirBsy Svetik 
(HMj. 

KudMova did a good jch m Missouri* 
Bietau said. "We needed mote of that to 
hjppen. We had two matches that we wm ki 
control of. One was six nutch points, and m 
didn't finish the jod' 

The only othet WMot to win Saturday was 
junior /nrianaYmreta, who came badt from* 
first-set kiss against Missouri^ Erika losbena It 
the Nolsk^ spot 12-6, 6-2, 6-2}. 

The WMots will rebim horrw Saturday to 
bee TbIsi ft Aheam FWd House, Sletau saki 
his team will focus on two things this weik ki 
practict. 

"Number one, we have to get ewryone 
healthy," he tiki. "Then, we hiw to And out 
who really wintt to pliy.' 



GLFJK-Statfttivtbto 
Calromli for golf toumaiMfrt 

Thi K-Suti mtnt golf turn lookt to bound 
btck ifUf tn IMi-plKt flnWi M tht Itta Plnir 
Inttrcollfglite two witki too, Tht IMkkM 
will triMlto Btiunwn, CilR,, to oanpliti ki 
th( Bnvfhttrt CItitlc. Tht (Wit tttrtiit 7:4S 
i.m today. 

Tht compftttkm In tht Brmhttrt CItiik 
incluto f«o. U UCLA and No, U Jtdaomllli. 

Sophomon Rotwt Stitti^ who flnbhed 
nint-ow pir, M K-StM it tht RIo Plnir 
imwcslltgliti. Junkir l^%iki hid tht 
t«and-bM Kon imong tht WHdcitv 
thooilng12-ovtr. 

WEQlEqutArtentumwIni 
■thofniS«turdty,Sundiy 

Tht K-Swi wommV iqMitflinliim won 
two hofflt thowi thli witkMid It tht tat Ottk 
Stiblet. 

Smmliy, tht Wildcats took homtfht plitt 
In both the morning and afttmoonihOM 
agiirw a fitkl whkfi ktdudtd Nidi HwA 
College, kiwi Sttti, Mbsoirl SUk, NortiwHt 
MItiourl Stiff and TnjmanStite. 

Sunder, K-Sttit tooli on T«u AM ki htid- 
tB-hetdcomptiHon. 

After tnklng 6-4 eirty In tht thow, tht 
Wlhkats cimt from behind to tdM out tan 
WM1M. ^^ 



(i 



Monday, March 5, 2007 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page? 



K-State-Salina to offer 
aviation courses at Fort Riiey 



- KANSAS STATE C(HUGI*N 

~ K-SUte-Saltni counet will 
Mon tnvtl ■ few tnllei eu(. 

Liter ihit month, Port Riley 
wUl offer thrv« courses tAUght 
\lg Inttnicton it K-St«t«-Stllna. 
Theee cUue* Include Intro to 
Aviation, Superviiury Manage- 
ntant and Aviation Maintenance 
Review. The claaiei wUl begin 
March 2ft. 

"We had a couple of meetingi 
to lee If there wai an intereat and 
we were overwhelmed with the 
demand," *aid Katie Mayei, co- 
ordinator of public and alumni 
ralatloni at K-State-Sallna. 

Thli U the flrtt time K-State- 
Salina will have cIbmc* at Port 
Riley. The daises will be Uught In 
the evenings every eight weelu. 

Mayes »id K-State-Salina of- 
ficiali decided to offer the classes 
because there was a high demand 
for aviation training at Fort Ri- 
ley. • 

Employees at K-State-Salina 
asked Larry Graham, pn^gram as- 
sistant for continuing education, 
to help them bring the course to 
FortRUey. 



Graham said It took about lix 
months to move from the infor- 
mational-type meetingi to coutm 
approval. Enrollment Is now 
open for the courses. 

Ihoui^ nobody Is enrolled In 
the claiaet yet, Mayes said theit 
are people In the process. She 
said she expects 60 people to en* 
roll In alt three course*. 

Tltf courses have the ttandard 
fee for tuition and continuing 
education, Mayes said. 

Graham said the course) tn 
open to everyone, Including sol- 
diers, civilians, retirees and peo- 
ple who are Interested In becom- 
ing commercial pilots. 

The Manhattan campus •!• 
ready has offered classes at Port 
Klley. Last spring, K- State offered 
Culture and Conflict, Introduc- 
tion to Women's Studies, Violence 
Prevention and Intervention and 
InU-oduction to American Ethnic 
Studin. 

Mayes said the courses will be 
a good thing for Port Riley. 

'We hope to provide the edu- 
cation that is needed," she sold. 

For more information on 
classes at Port Ril^, visit www. 
salina.k-state.edu/amty. 



ELECTION ANALYSIS 



Election trends predict 2007 voter turnout 



iy L a pin C A d a ms 

UKSASmTEOHiEaAN 

Between 4400 and 6,300 
students wUl vole in this 
week's general election If the 
last Ave elections are an accu- 
rate guide, but it is not eaajr to 
be sure. 

Polls will open tt 8 a.m. 
Tuesday, and students will be 
able to vote through iim/ut, 
ittttltctiom.luu.tdu un)U 6 
p.m, Wednesday. Positions In 
Student Senats, coUsge coun- 
dlSt Union Oovemlng Board, 
and the Student Publications 
Board of Dlrtctors, aa well u 
the titles of student body prcsl* 
dent and vice prealdent, are up 
for grabs, 

'The race is too dose to call 
between the two pairs of can- 
didates for student bo4y presi- 
dent and vice president: lim 
Mosimann, senior in political 
science and economics, and 
Nick Piper, junior In finance; 
and Matt Wagner, senior in 
management information sys- 
tem, and Lydia Peele, junior in 
secondary education. 

In last week's primary, 17 
votes separated the two win- 
ning candidate pairs - slightly 



Votts for studtflt body prtsldtnt candldatti* 



UN 

2063 2,190 

wos wi 

200t 4.W 
Avtrijt 3,SJ1 



3,237 
M*1 
5,201 
S,fi04 
A,?S9 



hrcant Inaaase 
17Jparant 

47.8 ptrctm 
2t.8p«ttf>t 
34 J pment 
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Only one of those three age at 23 percent. 



more than last year, when 
only 10 votes aepanted the 
winnen. 

Comparisons of the last Ave 
years show no advantage In 
Wkgner and Peele's small pri- 
mary lead of 1,314 votes over 
Mosimann and Piper's 1,497 
votes. Recent history shows it 
could go either way, 

First, the two pairs that 
won the primaries were with- 
in 200 votes of each other in 
three of the lasl five elections 
(2002, 2004 and 2006). 

The pair with the most 
votes in the primary won the 
general election only once in 
those three years. 

Second, the pair with the 
most votes in the primary went 
on to win the general eledion 
in three of the last five elec- 
tions (2003, 2004 and 2005). 



cases, the 2C04 election, came 
after a close primal^ finish. 

The Five previous primary 
elections totaled an avwtge 
of 3,331 students votes, and 
the general elections averaged 
4,772, The differences between 
the primary and general elec- 
tions range between about 29 
and almost 48 percent, aver- 
aging a 36.6>percent increase, 

Last week's actual turnout, 
not including write-ins, was 
3,3 13 votes. If a 36 6-percent 
increase can be expected, 
Wsgner-Peele and Moslmann- 
Piper should receive 4,526 
votes between them. 

Another projection com- 
{wres ttimout to enrollment. 

The last five elections show 
that 16-30 percent of enrolled 
students voted, with tiie aver- 



Ihe K-8tate Registrar's of- 
fice reported K-State's total 
enrollment on tiie 20th day of 
class this semester was 20,747 
If prior trends hold true, 4,771 
students could be expected to 
vote in tiie election, but that 
could range between 3300 
and 6300. 

The actual turnout this year 
depends more on how well the 
two pairs of candidates gamer 
support than anything else. 

Mosimann said he expects 
3,000 to 6,000 voters. 

"Hopefully, about 31 per- 
cent vote for us," he said. 

Wagner said he hoped for 
between 6,000 and 6,300. 

"Make sure you read up on 
the candidates and where ttiey 
stand for the next year, and 
juft vote," he said. 






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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, March 5, 2007 



Success of K-State basketball improves local economy 

Improving sports teams attract more fans, bring increased spending to area businesses 



" ByMandyStarV 

MNiAiSIAItCatlGIAN 

'' Money Rowing from visitors' 
pbckets into Manhattan during 
basketball wut:kends boosts the 
Jocal economy, but it is difficult 
ftf say just bow much 

City oflicials have known for 
ytfara the economic gains caused 
by the K- State football program, 
Wit the effects are more difficult 
tti trace for basketball 
"'"K-State football is a tre 
menduus boost to Manhattan's 
economy," said Lyie Butler, 
Ntinhattan Area Chamber of 
t?tjmmcrcc president. "You go 
iHio any store or restaurant on 
Saturday morning and you'll 
rfbtice a sea of purple" 

K-State football has been 
fifomincnl for more than 15 
yiiars, but Manhattan is not yet 
J&nsidered a basketball town, 
despite the team's recent sue 
diis, Butler said. 
■'^' "The seating capacity of 
Bt^mlage Coliseum compared 
;|o Bill Snyder Family Stadium 
i'ticounts for a lot of the difier- 
l¥rce," Butler said "And K-State 
basketball isn't as established as 
Irotball." 

I Much of the financial input 
fif m football comes from out- 
of town fans, whereas more 
local residents and students at- 
tend basketball games, he said. 



"The sold-out games this 
year have increased the number 
of people coming in from out of 
town before games to eat and 
shop," Butler said. "But we still 
see the most sales from local 
residents, whether it's eating in 
restaurants before the game or 
visiting AggieviJIe afterwards." 

Football fans generally come 
for the whole weekend, but bas- 
ketball fans usually only stay 
one night, he said. 

"For football, people come 
Irom far away Hiey tailgate and 
the games take longer.' Butler 
said "Basketball games have a 
different atmosphere because 
they're not as long and there's 
no lailgating." 

The Manhattan Tbwn Cen- 
ter's restaurants and stores see a 
sales boost when K-Stale sports 
teams play, said Sara Van Allen, 
mall marketing manager 

"We have a big-screen TV in 
our food court, and we've no- 
ticed a large increase in people 
coming in to watch the game," 
Van Allen said. 

Kite's Bar & Grill in Ag- 
gieville usually adds one or two 
servers to handle the extra busi- 
ness during basketball games, 
said general manager Chris 
Smith. The restaurant sells 
more food and alcohol ~ about 
double the amount served on a 
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"We expect a large crowd 
for basketball games, especially 
on the weekends," Smith said. 
"More out-of-town fans means 
we beef up our staff." 

Hotel employee also no- 
ticed a recent influx of guests. 

"Before this season, no- 
body really came for basketball 
games," said Ttresa Morris, gen- 
eral manager at Hampton Inn, 
"This year, we've generally been 
ftill for all the games, whether 
it's a Monday or a SatiuiJay." 

l*inpointing actual economic 
increases fron) sports is difficult, 
even for experts, said Dennis 
Tbll, tourism sales manager for 
the Manhattan Convention and 
Visitors Bureau 

Based on attendance and cs 
timated spending. Toll estimat- 
ed fo<3tbatl's economic effect to 
be about $1.4 million per game. 
He said input from basketball is 
harder to determine. 

"Dunng weekends with foot- 
ball games, every hotel is filled," 
Toll said "We estimate that 75 
percent of those rooms are for 
K-State football With basket- 
ball, there are fewer people trav- 
eling, which means less spend- 
ing" 

Tbll estimated an increase 
to the local economy of about 
$200,000 to $250,000 per bas- 
ketball game for weeknight and 
weekend games, respectively 



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Saturday afternoon at Bra m lag e Coliseum. The effect of basketball games on the local economy has 
increased with the recent success of the team, but football games still have a greater effect. 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Pag«9 



Hale Library copy 
center to relocate 






Students and faculty who 
uae the seivices of \he copy 
center in H«]e Library soon 
mi^t have to go somewhere 
else. 

K-State Printing Services 
will close the copy center in 
Hale at 5:30 p.m. March 8 
and move main printing op- 
erations to the copy center in 
the K State Student Union be- 
ginning March 9. 

"Hie decision to cease 
operation of the library copy 
center was mainly for finan 
cial reasons," said Ed Wtlbum, 
director of printing services 
"The workload at Hale had 
steadily declined to a point 
where it was no longer finan- 
cially able to survive" 

Wilbum said members of 
printing services intend to 
add high-speed scanners and 
new, self-serve copiers in Hale 
to make up for the loss of the 
copy center. 

They also plan to keep at 
least one photocopy machine 
on each floor of the library, he 
said 

Wilbum also said patrons 
will be able to scan library 
materials for free and have the 
option of either saving the re- 
sulting files to a flash drive or 
e- mailing them. 



Glenn Hoover, assistant di- 
rector of printing services, said 
the move should be more cost 
efiecttve and will make print- 
ing easier and quicker for con- 
sumers, he said 

Printing from the press can 
take 1 1/2 to three weeks de- 
pending on the complexity of 
the job and the quantity print- 
ed The copy center turns jobs 
around in times ranging from 
less than 24 hours to as many 
as several days, depending on 
complexly of the job, Hoover 
said. 

He said many things can 
factor into the slow printing 
process. Binding options that 
require handwork or mailing: 
specialty jot» that need to be 
cUe-cut, embossed, numbered 
or perforated; and )obs that 
have special order papers can 
take several days. Hoover said 
the copy center will discuu a 
due date with customers and 
finish the project within a rea- 
sonable deadline 

"Printing Services is com- 
mitted to the students and the 
university," Wilbum said "Be- 
cause we are eliminating some 
duplication of services, we will 
be able to enhance the Union 
copy center operation." 

Ttxe copy center, which is 
next to the food court in the 
Union, is open &om 7:30 a.m. 
to 5 p.m. weekdays. 



FICTION 



MEMORIAL I ROTC honors 
soldier, 2003 graduate after death 



Continued bom Pi^ 1 

room during the dedication 
with the rest of Coins' family 
and friends Following open- 
ing remarks and a prayer, 
retired Lt. Col, Art l>egroat, 
who originally suggested the 
room dedication in memory of 
Coins sjmounced the found- 
ing of a new scholarship in 
honor of Coins. ROTC will 
award the scholarship once a 
year to the top recondo cadet. 

"Everyone here works very 
hard to keep Michaels legacy 
alive, and today is a testament 
to that," Degroat said. 

Family and friends then 
were taken into room II of 
Myen HaU to view the newly 
dedicated room 

Johnson talked about 
Coins' character, saying he 
"ran the RCfTC program with 
precision." 

"He was confident but a 



man of few words, and when 
he talked, people listened," 
Johnson said. 

Janet Sain, ROTC cadet 
administrator and mentor to 
Coins in his time at KState, 
attended the dedication, 

"This has definitely been 
hard on everyone," Sain said. 
"It's always the good ones that 
die young." 

After the tour, cadets un- 
veiled a dedication outside 
room II. The dedication in- 
cluded Coins' framed military 
jacket and a plaque announc- 
ing the new official name of 
the room. The crowd stood for 
a moment of silence and a clos- 
ing prayer A smaller plaque 
located outside the door lists 
Coins' birth and death dates, 
rank and service description. 
It also has a small inscription, 
summing up the purpose of 
the memorial: 'With eternal 
gratitude for your service," 



Earbud Evil j Near the point of no return 



■y Logan CAdHM 

KANSAS STMECCHLfGli^N 

Editor's note: This is the sixth sepnent of "Earbud Evil," a fie- 
tioital story the Collegian is publishing daily over a thee week 
period This story iollottts Alex, a fictional K-State student, as he 
deals wHh a campus-wide crisis that threatens the university. 

Though the names of real people will accompany made-up 
characters, ail events are fktionaL This is intended for entertain- 
ment and is not factually based. 

If you missed sections one throu^ five, you can read them on- 
line today at wwui.kstatectdlegian.com. 

Something in the back of my mind made a crazy racket, telling 
me this scrambled audio file was somehow significant. 

"You put this on your iPod because Rhett told you to?" I asked 
Katie. 

She said he'd put the podcast on there as a surprise for her, then 
gave me an unhappy look. 

"Don't say it Alex." Katie said "I know it was creepy of him to 
do that. Rhett does a lot of creepy things." 

As much at I wanted to kiww what other sorts of things the 
creep had been up to, 1 decided it was best to stick to the subject at 
hand, I asked if she'd listened to the file. 

"Nope," Katie said, "t never had the time, thanks to class and the 
game. Should 1 give it a whirl now?" 

She might have made an excellent guinea pig for new recipes 
and class assigrunents, but I thought it best not to use Katie for this 
kind of experiment. I told her to delete it right away and asked if 
Rhett was around. 

"No, he said he was tired and went home after the game," she 
said. 

At least he's back up to using words, 1 thought, and asked when 
Katie thought she'd see him again She said she didn't know, so I 



totd her to call me when she did. I drove home to see what dirt 
I could dig up on "The Sunflower State Sports T^ Show' It 
wouldn't be a simple task. 

My computer takes 20 minutes after I turn its power on to w«ke 
up enough to cotmect to the Internet, lb call it a "bad machine" 
would be tike calling a hangover during a final exam an "iiKOve- 
nience" 

1 hit the startup button and sat down to what I knew would be a 
long wait 1 remembered my own iPod sitting on my dresser not five 
feet away and the fresh music I'd loaded onto it the night before. 

I took my iPod off of the shelf and put the headphones on, hop- 
ing the music might help me think. 

My throat was scratchy and I'd skipped diimer, so 1 held off on 
picking a song, I put a cup of water into the microwave for a cup 
of noodles, and the first flavorful beverage I could find went into a 
glass. 

Drink in hand, I navigated the MP3 player's menus 

First ■MUSIC' ITien I picked "PLAYUSTS " and scrolled down 
to "RECENTiy ADDED." 1 clicked open the folder, and the s^t 
made me drop my full glass of orange juice all over my green shag 
carpet. 

The very same sports podcast Rhett put on Katie's iPod was at 
the top of the playltst - only I'd never downloaded it 

1 stood there, stunned, for several minutes until the microwave 
finbhed heating my water and buzzed, knocking me from my stu- 
por I tore the wires ofi of my head like they were some closet 
monster's tentacles and sat down on the bed. 

I looked at the remains of my alarm clock on the floor where 
they'd been since I broke it that morning, then looked back at the 
tPod's screen. My eyes went back to the alaim clock - its dead 
display seemed to say "You're welcome," 

The meaning still escaped me. I tossed a towel onto the spUl and 
laced up my shoes. 1 needed to take a walk to get this mess figured 
out 



Grad students display research, prepare for professional world 



BySoittGlrard 

KANSAS STATE CaiECIAN 



Graduate students showed their re- 
search Friday and hoped to gain valuable 
input &rom professors and feUow graduate 
students. 

The I2th-annual Graduate Research Fo- 
rum, which took place on the second floor 
of the K-State Student Union, allowed grad 
students to display, discuss and present their 
materials to judges and passers-by. 

Kelt an Kershner, chair of the research 
forum committee and graduate student in 
agronomy, said the presentations were a 
broad representation of research on cam- 
pus. 

Although more than 25 graduate stu 
dents displayed their research, 10 research- 
ers were chosen to travel to the annual Cap- 
itol Graduate Research Summit on March 
15 in the Kansas Statehouse in Topeka 
Kershner said thc»e students will be able to 
present their r^earch to a larger audience 
outside of K-State 

He also said about half of I^Jisas' repre- 



sentatives will look at and evaluate the re- 
search. The 10 students traveling to Topeka 
also displayed a variety of graduate research 
at K-State. Students displayed research on 
topics from wheat protein analysis to child 
nutrition programs 

Kira Arnold, graduate student in agron- 
orn^, presented her research on the impor- 
tance of prairie land on carbon levels. She 
said the forum was a valuable experience. 

"1 think it is really good practice, espe- 
cially before going to a professional meet- 
ing," she said. 

Ceorge GrifFilh, graduate student in cur- 
riculum and instruction, also said the forum 
helped him prepare for other presenta- 
tions. 

"11 has definitely helped me to improve 
presentation skills and make a deadline," he 
said, 

Kershner said he and the other members 
of the research forum committee tried to 
make the event as professional as possible 

He said one of the biggest parameters 
was that presenters had to turn research in 
on deadline and could not change it after. 



"That's what it's like in the real world," 
he said. 

In addition to allowing students to de- 
velop presentation skills, the fonim also al- 
lowed them to interact with other gradu^ 
students and K-State faculty, Kershner sakl. 

He said many students are expected to 
research when they enter graduate schod 
but do not get the opportunity to interact 
much with other people outside of their 
field of study. 

"It's all about communication and in- 
forming scientists and the general public," 
he said 

Undergraduate students also presented 
research to K-State faculty as a learning afljt 
developmental e)q>erience. 

The projects not chosen as one of the 10 
to go to the summit either were presented to 
faculty judges or displayed as posters for the 
public to view. 

The forum committee gave first second 
and third place prizes totaling $1,000 for 
the undergraduate, poster sessions, sciences 
I and II and social science and education 
presentation pools, 



CLINTON I Former president addresses world issues, proposes solutions 



Continued from Page 1 

Richard Nixon to present a Landon Lecture 
since the series began in 1966. The lecture 
also marked the culmination of an effort 
to bring Clinton to K-State that began in 
1993. 

In their absence, Clinton thanked native 



Kansans Dan Glickman. former US Secre- 
tary of Agriculture; former Sen Bob Dole, 
R'Kan ; and former Sen. Nancy Kassebaum 
Baker, R-Kan , Alf Landon's daughter. 

Charles Reagan, chair of the Landon 
Lecture series, said 9,300 tickets were dis 
tributed for the lecture. Workers set Bram 
lage up to accommodate 9.500 people for 



the lecture, and Reagan said he saw few 
empty seats 

Reagan said he thought Clinton gave an 
excellent speech. 

"It was hard to disagree with the overall 
goals that he presented," Reagan said. "He's 
a very charming guy backstage He has a 
way of connecting with his audience" 



LECTURE RESPONSE | Listeners debate Clinton's proposed ideas 



Now LEASING FOR 



Fall 200^ 



Continued bom Page 1 

is inherent," said Erin Andrews, Wamego 
resident. "America needs to help fix the 
problem before it begins." 

However, some argued K is more impor- 
tant for the country to focus on domestic 
issues to secure a prosperous future 

"As much as it is necessary to help in the 
prosperity oi international issues, there are 
stilt plenty of prevalent tasks to complete at 
home," said Laura White, freshman in civil 
engineering "1 remember him saying that 



we have the plan to fU domestic issues and 
putting that plan into action should be a top 
priority" 

Clinton said it will be important for 
America to continue to develop industry, 
and as a model he suggested the clean en- 
ergy industrial and economic boom of both 
the United Kingdom and Denmark. 

'The proof is out there that industrial- 
izing the clean energy efiort could have a 
great impact on our economy," said Ryan 
Heathman, freshman in open option "If 
given the right amount of time and plan- 



ning, it could really help the country." 

One reason students said they enjoyed 
the Clinton lecture was that though he hint- 
ed at relevant issues, Clinton did not speak 
about the war in Iraq, instead keeping his 
speech optimistic 

"The Landon Lecture is supposed to be 
on current events, and I think that many 
people were afraid he was either going to 
speak on Iraq or tout his wife's election 
platform," White said. "I think we were all 
happy to hear about a topic of hope, one 
that we can all take something from."" 




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Moo-Tliun 3:00-5ffi) 

Mon.Wed.Frl 2i)0~4iX> 

TUes, Thun 4:00-4.-00 

itt ZM>-4«0 



1026 Owgc »22 
Mod 4 3 0-6:30 

TNin 3:30-5:30 

Ffl 12:30-230 

SM IWMAO 

M»LeavemiiwiHii2 

Mon-frl 5:30-7:30 

SM t2:0O-2.'O0 



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EDROOMS 



IMonWeAM S«0-1tXI0wfl 

3;3«-<«0 
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Fri 
Sun 

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10;0&-2m 

1:00-5300 
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4 



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925DenIson»4 

view at 925 DCfllMH! #4 
Mon.Wed.Frt 6:00-aK>Opm 

Tlies, Tliun SflO-7:00 

Sal 1Z:0O-2.'O0 

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Studios 



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St 1H>0-3:00 




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itidtprof>ettlcs.com 

Ssrturday OfDce Hours: I0«m-2pm 

MrCULmUCHnFVFmPMFNI 



Page 10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, March 5, 2007 



Swine vaccine tested at K-State 



■y Erk Mvit 

KANSAS <iMIIUH I itdW 

A VTius h» Jpmud arvniiid 
I he world. lukvUii): iuhI killu^ 
>wiiic lifitb in rewml nuinbinv 

Pig hftib atf\«ss the I'liiled 
States haw btvn inlivti\i wilh 
tlie PC\2 vims, or jxtrvine 
liicovinis t>'pe 2 It fuuiiU its 
way to Kamas, where tt has 
spread tii Ltunmcrtial herds 

While the virus sprvads M 
random, scientists have not \/Ki 
(icttnnined the virus' modf of 
irunsmissiun^ 

Steve Dritz. asstKiate profcs 
sur uf diagnuslic medicine aiid 
pathwbiology, is on a team o( 
rc-scarchers twting (he vaccine 

'It is estimated that almost 
all swine herds in Kansas are 



utfccted with the vims," Dritz 
Mid. 

Dritz explained that nut all 
pip infected with the virus ex- 
hibit symptoms, meaning the 
vims and development of the 
disease are not the same thing. 

In other parts of the world, 
the virus has been a problem for 
the past 10 years, he said. 

Dritz and his team are not 
the only ones who have been 
working on a vaccine. 

"There are several other 
groups around the world 
studying the virus and how it 
spreads," Dritz said 

Dritz said team members 
found promising results that the 
vaccine works. 

According to Bio-Tech.com, 
the mortality rate in vaccinated 



pigs was SO percent less than 
those pigs who were not vac- 
cinated. The study also showed 
vaccinated pigs were 20 pounds 
heavier than those who were 
not vaccinated. 

Richard Hesse, associate 
professor in diagnostics medi- 
cine and pathobiology and 
director of diagnostic biology, 
explained what effects arc as- 
sociated with the disease. 

"The most notable eScct of 
the disease is death in the fin- 
isher pig," Hesse said. 

He said the disease causes 
many other ailments that result 
in the death of the pig. 

The vaccine, now available 
in limited quantities to the pub- 
lic, wilt undergo further testing 
at K-State. 




\operfy ^JUanagement 

Since 1974 

1125 Laramie SuiteC 
Manhattan, K5 66502 

785-537-0205 

4 Bedrooms 4 Baths 

1120& 1122 Pierre 

4 Bedrooms 2 Baths 

923 Bluemont "A" 
923 BluerTXJnfB" 

1614 Humboldt 

712Laramie''B" 

1712 Colorado 

3 Bedrooms 2 Baths 

927 Frenrxint 
1539 Campus 

3 Bedrooms 1 Bath 

2461 Hobbs 

201 S Anderson 

Plus numerous 2 bedroom 

and 1 bedroom apartments 

View our properties at 
www.moorepropertyma nagennent xom 



Union ^ogr 
Council 



Monday, March 5 



Festival of Nations: Afrian Culture 

Union Courtyard, ground floor • noon - 1 pm 
Atlanta-based recording artist Sarah Peacock 
Union Station, ground floor •7:30 




Tuesday, March 6 



All UPC Meeting 

union Station, ground floor • 5:30 pm 



Wednesday, March 7 



UPC Executive Commtttee applications due 

by 5 pm in UPC Office, third floor 
PuMlc Smoking Forum 

Room 212, second floor • 4:30 - 6:30 pm 



Friday, March 9 



Film: Casino Rotate 

Forum Hail, ground floor • 8 pm, $1 
Also showing: Saturday, March 10 • 7 & 10 pm, $2 
Sunday, March U • 8 pm, $2 
After Hours: Jessica Lynn Johnson 

Union Station, ground floor •10:30 pm 



Kemper Art Gallery 



Christine HIebert, March 8 - Aprii 2 



How much would you pay to see Dane Cook? 



We are excited to announce that we are pursuing the opportunity to host Dane 
Coolc. Though the proposai Is waiting approval and no date has been announced, 
we hope that he and his management wili accept one of our proposed dates. In 
the mean time, take our online survey at www.k-state.edu/upc to let us know 
what you wouid be wiiling to pay for tickets. 



Little Apple. Film Festival 



Attention film makers: Cash prizes for the best student-made fllm. 
For more information, visit our website. 







CLASSIFIEDS 



Classifieds continue 
on the next page 




BuUptin Board 




izAm TO Ftyi K-Sta1e 
tlymg Club has ftva air- 
nianes and lowesi rates 
Call ;8?i-r76-1744 www- 
■>5U mlM^c 



THE SECRET Free show- 
ing SatufiJay MsrcM 10, 
?pm eCM CenlBi 1021 
Dentin. Uae the law o1 
attractton 10 manliest suc- 
cess, happinees, 8t)un^ 
dance Spor>»tvr: Unttv 
Chutch of Mannattati 



I 




Lost and found wit can 
be placed free tor three 
daya. 

LOST: PAIf4 at aya 
giaatea. Rsctangular 
sfvaped black ttamas, 
78S-53S-184e. plaaia 
leave a meaaaga 




Housing Real Estate 




Pre- 1 ease 

Today for 

Spring! 

Only A few 
hom«$ remain 

Amen It iM: 
•Wa*fier/Oryt« or 

hookups available 
•On Site Management 
•Car a get Available 
•Private Fitneii Center 
•Storm Center 
•Peaceful Garden 

Setting 
•tnormous Closeti 

GEQKGETOWSt 

776-8080 



Need a sublfiaser 



Advertise 
785-532-6555 



Few Spioi Remain lor 
•GradiKie Studants 
• Utiiiet Clitiman 

Ananlitai 

' -■'.irqptlM^Hnm^hM 

' ,..f -nL'ilSatW) 

• '■ ■ •<' «<*(«!(bi«m(v^-. 

••UnlMNitiiVGnin 

CivlMMf faftriet 

•Tlni'''ni«iw<t«aNniM 

•OvSMUaiiawiONct 

WESTCHESTER PARK 
776-1118 



Hanhenan CITY Ordl- 
n*«K* M14 eaauree ev- 
ery peraon equal opportu- 
ntty In hou ilr>gwl1hou1dle- 
ttnctlon on account of 
race. sen. famfllal atatui. 
mllHary itatua. dtaeMlltv, 
rattglon, age, oojor. ne- 
Honal origin or anceatry 
Vlofationa ahouM be re- 
ported to ttw DIractor of 
Human Raeoureea al Clly 
Hall, (7BS)MT2440 



, 1420 

Bcichwood Ttrract 

N?w*r AMrtmem 
Lg Z & 3 Bedrooms 
1" Bath J 
Waiher/Dryer 
Energy Efficiem 

On 1 Weeded 

Secluded 2 ktr* Lat 

witK Crtth 



S740 & seas 

341-4024 




Spacious 
Duplexes 

Custom boilt with tne 
K-Slaie student 

in mino 

(acti dupto) laitutat walk-ir 
cloMU. all kKhtn 
iftpliancti. waftief/drya'. otl 
ftrHI parting, phona amt 
cabit connactiDfii pn avtry 
raom, Hcunty bghting, Ifiiti 
tt\4 lavw cira 

SacunT) dtpoiit i> IIh um* 
ai ona tnonHt'i ram Tha 
Itata ptnod b*^tni AuQuit t 
fof ona ytar 

4 l*droome. 2 tatha 
1,300 Sq. n. 
ONIV II.IMyino 



Outel Na^hborhood, 

Convenient and Clota 

to Campua 

Devi Xia-«Tt1 



1219 KEARNEY. One- 
bedroom. June, year 
laasa Water/ trasfi paid. 
Next to can>pus. eft street 
pArVlnQ. No pets. S3B0. 
785-539-5 1 36 

1219 KEARNEY TWO- 
BEDROOMS August. 
yMf l«Ma Walei/ traih 
paid. Neict to campus, o<f 
street perking. No peli. 
S660 765 539-5136 

ALLIANCE PROPERTY 
MANAGEMENT. One-bed 

nxnn .June, July, August. 
785539-4357 »rww,fent- 
aptTicom 

JUNE 1 ona-bedrooms 
$345- Oes. two-bed- 
rooms S420- $486. threa- 
tiedroom $825 lour-bed- 
roofm $650 All ckise to 
KSU 785-587.<l399 

ONE. TWO, lour, (Ive-bed- 
room apartftMnl&f bouses 
lor June and August 
leases 7S5-S64.oe57 

ONE. TWO. *tee. and 
lour -bedroom apartmenla. 
Ckiaa 10 campus and ag- 
glavlle. Parlting and laun- 
dry 785 539 5800 

ONE, Two, ititee, four, 
Itve, all bedroom apan- 
menV fwuaea next to cam- 
pus Washer/ dryer, cen- 
tral air t^o Peta. 

7I8-S37-T0W. 

6NE6EDflOOM 
ACROSS the street from 
campua. 1425 per month 
No petl. Available June/ 
August 7B5-3 13-7473 

ONE BEDflOOIVI TO five- 
bedrooms. Apartments, 
duplexes and homes 
Most close to campus 
Soma farther away June 
or August leases Check 
out our website www- 
emeraldpropertymenag- 
rDenloom or calt Emerald 
Properly Man age ma nt 
785-587-9000 lOf more in- 
lormalkin 



THREE AND four-bed- 
room apartments avail- 
aide tn August. Close to 
campus. Water and trash 
paid Com operated laun- 
dry 785-537-7810. 
765-537-2255 

THHEEBEDHOOM. ONE 

bath plus vanity $t050.' 
month Trash/ water paM 
1510 Collage Ave Pool 
access Washer/ dryer in 
unit 314-805-0674 

TWO, THREE and lour- 
badrooms, ckiaa to cam- 
pus, central air. dtah- 
HBshar. laundry facdities. 
No peu, 7B5 -539-0866. 

TWO BEDROOM SPE- 
CIAL al Parti Place Apart- 
ments $495 rent plus free 
cable through July OT 
785-539-2951 

TWO-BE DROOM, 
CLOSE to campus Per- 
sonal wasfwr/ dryar S645- 
$675/ monlh 

785-341-4496 

TWO-BEDHOOM, many 
dZM attd pncas. June or 
Auguri. 785-341-0666. 

VERY NtCE Ihrsa-bed- 
room. two bath apanmant 
Three bbcks to Agguvtlla 
822 Fremont Allordable 
utilllles, Augual 1. 
786-313-1607 

WHY RENT WHEN YOU 
CAN BOY? Cnndos (or 
sals Two and three -bed- 
room starting al $112,650 
collaslalevliia com 
78»B8T'«>M. 
WHMAf VILaOE Avarl- 
aUe June or August tour- 
bedroom, two t>ath. 
washer/ dryer storm 
n)om. $1400. Cabia pak] 
785-778-2425 or 

785-565-3780 www.vd- 
lage rentala com. 



L0OKINI3 FOR three 
roommates In (our-bed- 
room duplex 500 

Laramie S2S5 per roofh. 
Washer/ Dryer. 

785-410-2918 or 

785-447-0852 

SIX AND nve-bedroom 
house/ du|>lei, next to 
campus Personal 

waatter/ dryer, central air, 
olt-street panung. no pats 
785-537-7050 



THREE-BEDROOM 
LIMT. kicated at 8/ 802 
North 5th No pala, $975/ 
month, availabte June f 
785-564-0372 



WALK TO class Ona, 
two, tfvee. touf-bedroom 
No smoking, no drinking, 
no pelts ^5-539-1554. 



MANHATTAN OTTY Ordt- 
nanea 481 4 aeeuree ev- 
ery pereon equal opportu- 
nity In housing arlthoul dl*- 
tkicilen on account at 
raca, aax. familial statue, 
immary atatus. diaabliny. 
religion, age. color, ne- 
llonal oftgin or anceatry. 
VIoMlona ehouM be re- 
ported to the Director of 
Human Heeourcea at Clly 
Halt. <7851M7-2440. 

1117 VaHI^N iJe* ail 
electric Two-taadrooma. 
tpplisncea furnished, ot> 
pats. Ckiae to campua. 
78S-539-197S or 

4 



ONE-BEDROOM 


VERY 


nice. 


close 10 


campus 


1476- 


$550 a 


month 


785-341-0686 






PARK PLACE Apart- 
manta One- Bedrooms 
Summer/ led teasing Pets 
wekxime One- halt mila 
from KSU at Seth Child 
endClaflin 786-539-2951. 

PARK PLACE Apart- 
ments. Two- bedrooms 
Pets wetoome Summef/ 
Fall teasing One- half 
mHa from KSU at Selh 
Child and Claflin 
786-539-2961. 



A ROOM 10 sublease. 
Vary kiw prlca $220 per 
month Including utility 
lees. 914 Bluemont Ave 
Near campus 

785-317-1734 





FOUR BEDROOM 
THHEE baths. June or Au- 
gust, $1280, nica. washer/ 
dryer hookups, olf-strael 
parkirtg. great localKin, no 
pels/ smoking. 

785-532-8256 



WILDCAT 

PROPERTY 

MANAGEMENT 

537-3332 

8* & Moro 

2BR $650 

3BR- $1,300 

4BR- $1,700 

1 4* & Fromonf 

4BR TA Bolti 

$1,650 

Anderton Vlllogc 

IBR $525 
2eR $700-725 



1501 Poynfz 
HouMi ■ $750 
3BR 2 Bath 



1509Poynti 

House $600 

IBR- IBath 



315Poynlz 
IBR - $650 

Fall Leasing 



1015 PIERRE. Vary nice, 
lour-badroom Fenced in 
back yard Spacious 
rooms Washer/ dryer 
July or August lease All 
pels considered Chris, 
785-770-2161 

1310 H. nth. Two-bed 
room, June leaaa No 
pets, cloaa to campus. 
785-539-1975 Or 

785-313-8292. 



1417 NICHOLS, tour-bed- 
rooms, family room 1909 
Kenmar. three-bedrooms. 
Both two bathrooms, 
washer/ dryer, garage 
game room, fenced yard/ 
palk) 785-539-1177 

M» FREMONT, three-bed- 
room, one tiath, no pels 
Available June 1 
78S-S39-1975 or 

785-313-8292 

AVAILABLE JUNE 1 
Three -t>odroom house lo- 
cated at 1501 Harry 
Road Two btoeks west of 
campus, central air. 
washer/ dryer, fenced 
yard 785-539-3672 

CLEAN. QUIET basement 
■panment Two-ti«droom, 
two bath, fuM krlchan. pa- 
tio $385 par month per 
person. Atl utitltias In- 
duded. emityligkau.edu 






^ 




FIVE-BEOROOM, JUNE 
lease. Very ck)se to cam- 
pus (westslde). Just pur- ^ 
chased and vary nice I - 
Central air. full kitchen 
(stove/ refrigerator/ dish- 
washer/ diaposaf). partial 
kttchen (stove/ refrtgaia- 
(Or), tfuoe balhs, three liv- 
ing areas, double car ' 
garage. No pets. Call 
now, this will rent fast 
785-539-4841 

FtVE-BEOROOM, TWO 

bath house for rar^t 931 
Valtiar June lease 
Washer/ dryer, window slr- 
oondltkining Fenced back- 
yard, pets allowed Off- 
street parking $t 500/ 
month 785-539-4949 

FIVE-8E0R00IW June, 
July August Alliance 
Properly Management. 
785 539-4357 www.rant- 
apmcom 

FOUR-BEDROOM AND 
six-t3edroom houses 
Ckisa to campua and Ag- 
giavdla Pahtlng and laun- 
dry 785-539-5800 

FOUR -BE DROOM 
HOUSE, 2030 College 
Helghia, Central heat and „ 
Btr, washiar/ dryer No' 
pets. $290/ bedroom. 
June 1 lease. 

785-944-3491 

fOUH-BE DROOM. ONE 
bath rtouSB tor rent 900 , 
Vatlier June lease - 
Washer/ dryer, centre! ilr- 
oondltioning Fenced back- 
yard, pets alknved. i\2Q0i , 
month Party shack and " 
garage Included. 

785-539-4949 

FOUR-BEDHOOM, TWO 
and one-halt balh, study 
August 1 $975 per 
month Knight Real Es- 
tate Call 785-539-5394 

FOUR BEDROOM, TWO 
balh, nice slied bed- 
rooms Centra) air, two 
car garage, westter/ dryer 
No peti/ snvAtng $1400/ 
month, avaMebie In Au- 
gust. 1420 Vlala Lane, 
two and one half bkich* - 
from campua. 

316-680-1709 

FOUR BEDROOM. TWO 
bath, two k lichens, ctosa 
to campus 785-341-9459 

FOUR-BEDROOM, TWO 
bath, waahar/ dryer, ' 
garage June i < 
785-532-956 4 

F0UR9E0RO0M. 
JUNE, July August Al- 
Hence Property Mmmq*-. 
mint 7a6-53»-*367,www.- 

f«m-i(ini.(!afn 



Classifieds continue 
from the previous page 



CLASSIFIEDS 



Monday, March 5, 200? 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



P»ge11 



II II I I 



II II 

:: L> 'J : 



■ ■ ■ I II ■ 
I j ■ ■ I ^ ■ 



LET'S RENT 



Rent-Apt Unfimistwd ffgnf-Apt Ur^mistied 



121B POVNTZ, tWD-bM- 
roonu. across tram dty 
pat% wtth ofl-streat park- 
ing Central M. washer' 
diver NbwfhI aitor! wjtti 
taW rt-mod*!. Water and 
tnah (Mid, June laasa. Ho 
pM. 786-313-4812, 
tt^ Hlk^bk. 6..e, 
one-twdroom (WOO) amJ 
Sludk) (S375) ri««r KSLI 
Laundry. Water, trash 
paid No pets, no imo4i- 
mg. 1 JUNE. 

S.T0-342-t1Z1 

330 N teth Two blocks 
to K-Slate and AggieviHo 
Mo-bsdroom apartrrwrnr 
Clean, qutet, private park- 
mg No smoking, rto pels 
SSBO, JuTM and August 
leases 785-539-5508 or 
795- 564-0657 

FOUR-BEDROOM, clOM 

to cainpus, central air, 
dishwasTwr No pats 
AvBila£>le Jiine or Auguat. 
785-S39-OSS6 

JUNE LEASE lw«-b*d- 
ioom apartment. Walk to 
campus EacaHant condi- 
Ijony tacatton httB,//!«WW.- 

rej) LiiLiai s ^gjljh 

785-410-2814 

LARGE TWO-BEDROOli 

daan. ctoaa to campus, 
eillapakl 78S-7SZ-71S1 

LARGE TWO-BED- 

flOOM. available June. 
Bdcorty, <lf*plM« 
dttihwastier. Very doa* to 
eampua Con 

785317-3780 Leave 

message 

PRE-LEAStNO JUNE and 
August, 5o<ne units Orand 
new. ctoae to KSU, 
washer/ dryer hctuded. 
Call tor details 

785-778-2102. youngwUk- 
stSyahoo.com, www.wUk- 
sapts,com 



STUDIO, ONE, two. and 
three-bedroom Juntf Au- 
gust laaa*. No pats Cen- 
tral halt' ak-condlticinjng, 
7»«7-»46Q 

porch and sunroom, SM 
BkMmont, August 1 lease, 
leundry Included, no pets, 
SMS plus utMI«9, 
7tS-313-OW2, leave mas- 
sage. 

'hvo AND three-bed- 
room Ckae to campus 
Central air, dlstwasher, 
coin operated iBiindry ta- 
CJtlty. Avatlatile June or 
AijQUSt No pets 

7S5-537-t 746 or 

7S5- 539- 1545 




1111 tWHARTON Manor 
Road, tour-t>ei>room lower 
level duplei with neutral 
oolofi. two baths, washer/ 
dryer himtahed 117 Val- 
uer, three-bedroom k)wer 
level duplex wtt^ new car- 
pet, neutral cotors and 
washer/ dryer hook-ups 
Very reasonable rent with 
great space m both du- 
plsitas June lease No 
pels. Call 785-313-48 12 




1001 KEARNEY Four- 
Bedroom, also have 
Three, Fhfe. Sli and 
Seven-8edfoom tiouses. 
All JUNE 1 rentals Pets 
OK. 785-317-7713 

1022 HUMBOLT. 824 

FraertKKit. 1118 Ratona. 
(ouT'bediDom, two bath, 
washer/ dryer. dlsh- 
washet, cenoal air. 
II1W - 11300 Doug. 
785-313-6573, 



RentHcmsc 



1305 PIERRE, 1110 
Pomartiy, $1100 - 11200. 
Four-bedroom, two bslh, 
wastwr/ dryer, dh*- 
washer, central tir Au- 
guel leaee 785-313-5573. 
Doug 

ismnronsB" 

Four-tiedroom, two baths 
Central an. washer/ dryer 
(umtghed. Neulrel cokxs 
wtth nice new bettts 
Large bedrooms lor en at- 
fordat>^ price. June 
lease No pets 

785-313-4812, 

200 M. 11th On Ctty Park, 
Two large, sunny three- 
bedroom (S7501 Laundry, 
Water, trash paid. No 
pets, no srrtofclng. 1 JUNE 
and 1 AUGUST 

530-342-1121. 

820 OSAGE. 1 524 Rpher, 
310O James, all lour-bad- 
rooina, two bath Juoa I. 
785-317-7713 

A SIX or sevan-lMdrooin 
house, three t>ethfooma 
Two blocks to KSU, Jtme 
1 785-317-7713, 

BRITTNAV RiOOE town 

houa* tour/ (ive-bedroom, 
two ar>d one-halt tiaths. In- 
cludes appliar>^s. 
washer/ dryer No pets 
AvaltatHe Auguat 1 . 
316-393-9828, 

Five-BEOROOH 

HOUSE Walk to campus. 
Two kitchiens, ttrep4aMa. 
central air. neutral cotora, 
washer/ dryer tumtshad, 
garage , lawn rr^alnte- 
nance June lease No 
pels CaH TS6-3I3-481S 

FIVE-BEDROOM TV^ 

twth. June lease, washer, 
dryer, dtstMiaahet. control 
air $1400 00' 
T05-3 13-5573 Doug. 



Rtnt-Housa 



FOUR TO nv»tedrown. 
Augurt l a aa e. No peta 
Central hMt/ alr-CoraWkm- 
Ing. Waahar/ dryer 
7»S-687-04« 
tiVH Umi&. avJlabie 
June t Four to (rire-t)«d- 
iDotn house k)cated east 
ol AggiavUle et 824 
Laremie Two bath, 
waahet/ dryer. diah- 
washer, central arr Laaise 
deposA plus uUktlas 
705-539-3672, 

NEXT TO cempu*. one 
through sbi-bedroom 

houses, and apertments 
Washer/ dryer, central air 
Available now or laU No 
lyets 785-537-7050. 

ONE -BEDROOM FULL 
bath, washer/ dryer, no 
sihOkers. SIS Vattler, 
$340 plus utilities August 
iMta, Call Monday Frt- 

dav.7B5-776-4a05. 

THREE-BEDROOM TWO 
bath, washer' dryer, no 
smokers 515 Vattwr 
M2S plus utilities. Auguet 
leaee Call Monday - Fri- 
day, 785-778-4805 

TRRfFSfBBMSTTTO 

bath 1205 1207 

Pomeroy June lease, 
waaher. thyer, dish- 
washer, central ail. 
$1050 00' mOiHh 

7S((-3I3-S573 Doug 

TWO- BEDROOM base- 
ment apartment Washer' 
dryei. No pels, $600/ 
month Cheap utlUlle*. 
Available August i, 1211 
Thurston 786-868-3471 
call after 
Tp.m 

TwasEDROOMS, one 
bath, attacitsd garage. 

Central air, appHanoea, 
washer' dryer No pMa. 
August, ITIO. 

785-S37-S420, 
705-341 -5346. 




JUNE LEASE, New three- 
twdpoom. two bath 
Washer/ dryer hookups. 
m pets, no sirmking 
11,025' month, CaH 
Kevin 785-486-77^, 

NICE HOUSE at 1010 
Lofltfonworth. Two full 
baths, all kitchen appli- 
ances Including washer' 
dryer. Upstairs has own 
heal arxJ air, and has HJSt 
tiaen lemodelad. Plenty ol 
parking alt alley, no pels, 
June lease. CM Oava, 
785-292-4320. evenings. 
785-298-4342. 

NICE TWO-BEDROOM 
Ck»e to cempus Avail- 
Btila June l, $590 
785-712-7257 

ONE TO ni^edroom 
apartments and house* 
Ckise to caihpus 
785-539-1975 or 

785-313-0292. 



Apartments, 
duplexes and homes 
Most cfcise 10 campus 
Some terther away June 
or August leases Check 
out oui website www - 
smaraldpropartymanag- 
montcom or call Emerald 
Property Management 
785-587-9000 lor more In- 
lornialkm 

ONE-eEOROOM, UTILI- 
TIES paid, washer' dryer, 
study, August 1 

785-532-9564 

SEV